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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Srt Marine Systems Plc LSE:SRT London Ordinary Share GB00B0M8KM36 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 35.25 34.50 36.00 35.25 35.25 35.25 83,891 08:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 18.9 -6.9 -3.9 - 58

Srt Marine Systems Share Discussion Threads

Showing 26176 to 26200 of 26575 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
15/1/2021
10:03
I am hoping that as soon as we get confirmation of the large ME contract, Finncap will produce a research note. The last one (sept 2020) referred to the various ME contracts and said 'These contracts could see FY 2021 revenue exceed £50m with adj PBT in double figures'. I note that Kuwait has had an election and this could result in a change of minister, plus contract delay. We are now less than 3 months from year end and after the ME contract Richard should have good visibility for the year end. I suspect that a lot of the kit for the contract, including screens and software are all ready to go. This will allow for an early slug of revenue to go to MSN. There should have been substantial revenue from Immems 2 with BFAR. It is unlikely that we will learn a lot about year end 2022, except that it should be larger than 2021. I am hoping that Finncap will give a guide on how the transceiver business is going. I am hoping for good news, despite covid. I am also hoping to hear about the new AIS product that is being developed.
countryman5
15/1/2021
08:51
I’m lost mate-what do you mean?
pinkfoot2
14/1/2021
23:20
I think investors can be forgiven for thinking they’re in a real life version of Groundhog Day.
yump
14/1/2021
21:56
Ffs it is an ais transponder surely?
yumyum
14/1/2021
20:14
Our French friends haven't gone away, it seems... https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2020/12/05/a-device-called-nemo-will-shed-light-on-small-scale-fisherfolk A device called Nemo will shed light on small-scale fisherfolk No one knows the size of their catch Fish are being plundered from the ocean at an alarming rate. According to the un Food and Agriculture Organisation some 90m tonnes of commercial catch are hauled from the sea every year. And that is only for legitimate, commercial fishing vessels. Even setting aside the huge amount of illegal fishing that goes on, few authorities monitor the activities of the 50m or so fisherfolk who operate small boats in local waters with the aim of feeding their families, or of selling their catch harbourside or into local markets. So an attempt is now under way to collect some of these missing data. The combined catch of such small-scale fishing could be half as much again as the reported global catch, according to Michel Dejean, director of sustainable fisheries for cls Group. cls is a subsidiary of France’s space agency that, among other things, helps monitor, via satellite, the transponders on large fishing boats operating around the world. (Those that switch off their transponders are tracked by radar.) For small craft, though, cls requires something simpler and cheaper. This is where the group’s experience in another area has come in useful—for the organisation also tracks marine birds and sea mammals, and for this it employs low-powered transponders. Engineers at cls have used that expertise to come up with Nemo, a self-contained transponder powered by a built-in solar panel, since many small fishing boats do not have electrical power on board. Nemo is about the size of a shoe. Once attached to a boat, it transmits its position either via satellite or, if within range of local services, mobile phone. Working with local fishery authorities and other organisations in Asia and South America, cls hopes to have deployed around 1,000 Nemos by the end of 2020. Costs are still being worked out, but the price of such a transponder is generally a few hundred dollars. That compares with several thousand for the sorts of system fitted to large commercial boats. Local fishing groups are also likely to come up with their own schemes to supply or lease the units. From cls’s point of view the idea is that, by knowing when a vessel has put to sea and where it has been fishing, it will be possible to build up a clearer picture of how small-scale fisheries operate in particular places. Also, reported catches can be verified against vessels’ actual locations. For this to stand any chance of working, however, fisherfolk must be persuaded that they, too, have an interest in having a Nemo attached to their boat. To do this, says Mr Dejean, means building a good safety and business case. As far as safety is concerned, fish-depleted inshore waters mean that many people are being forced to sail farther out to sea—often beyond mobile-phone range. This scuppers their only way of contacting home if something goes wrong. Nemo’s satellite connection overcomes that, and, to make doubly sure, the device is fitted with a single-button distress beacon which can summon help in a crisis. As to commercial incentive, the record of fishing grounds visited will, cls hopes, allow crews to obtain higher prices from concerned customers by proving their catches come from “sustainable” sources. Whether either of these baits will, in practice, hook enough of the world’s small fisherfolk remains to be seen. But even if only a few sign up, it may help plug a worrying hole in the planet’s fishery data. ■ =========== For more coverage of climate change, register for The Climate Issue, our fortnightly newsletter, or visit our climate-change hub This article appeared in the Science & technology section of the print edition under the headline "The ones that got away"
supernumerary
14/1/2021
19:59
I thought the US was the security patron of the Middle East-probably less so in recent years?
pinkfoot2
14/1/2021
18:04
Hi Countryman5, Great write-up, tks ! My only quibble would be where you write .."The driver for the fish monitoring systems is the EU. The EU buys a lot of fish from SE Asia and does not like illegal and unregulated (IUU) fishing. A red card means no exports, hence the need for the SRT system..." There's a French alternative, AIUI, not sure if it has sufficient capabilities to be 'in the frame', especially if the EU/French were to hint that buying from them would be 'helpful' in getting any 'red card' lifted ? This may sound like paranoia, but we've recently witnessed French foot-dragging on covid vaccine purchase and roll-out to favour their national champion, Sanofi. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/06/eu-approves-moderna-vaccine-tensions-slow-rollout .."Berlin has also come in for wider European criticism over its decision to reach a bilateral deal with BioNTech for an additional 30 million doses, while Paris has been accused in Germany of insisting that the EU buy less of the German firm’s vaccine in favour of one being developed by France’s Sanofi*..." * which has since been delayed, but that's another kettle of (ahem) fish... A country that's prepared to play politics with its own people's lives wouldn't , IMO, be above strong-arming some distant foreigners. ATB
extrader
14/1/2021
14:11
I believe that the US, China, India, France and Uk all have their Maritime Domain Awareness systems (MDA). My understanding is that one of the reasons why Bahrain chose the UK (SRT) system was that their previous US system had a backdoor to the CIA. Most countries value their security and this works very much in SRT's favour. The World bank is funding a fishing system for Bangladesh. No doubt China will come in with a low ball offer. China might be cheap(Reliability?????) but surely the Bangladesh gov would not allow China to control its fish monitoring, whilst knowing that China rapes and plunders fishing grounds around the world. I hope that China does not try and buy SRT. I imagine that Sri Lanka would not like the Indian system. Vietnam used to be tied at the hip with China but I can't believe that Vietnam, or any of her neighbours would countenance a Chinese system now. Independent UK has a lot going for it with regards to security systems.
countryman5
14/1/2021
12:18
''order book for £550'',ha ha! you've heard about the vsp too then?
hjb1
14/1/2021
11:31
I have been a supporter of this company for several years. I know nothing about boats. I was introduced to the company via my stockbroker. I liked the management and I thought that the product had great potential. Investing is always a gamble but I believe the path that the company has trod has been very fortuitous. The purchase of Geovs was the foundation of the 'Systems' business. I recognise that Mr T regards the company as his own. This shows a commitment but I have always found him accommodating to his fellow shareholders. I don't know of any other company where the CEO opens up to questions on a regular basis. There are many start out companies that are losing vast amounts of money each year but nevertheless have fancy valuations based on the assumption of future growth. This company started with creating the hardware of AIS modules. It has grown Emtrak as its own brand and developed ATON and is now developing a completely new device which will come onto the market in a few months time. They appear to have acquired some very clever 'boffins' which keep developing new technology. This side of the business, including OEM sales to the likes of Raymarine (currently supplying the US coastguard)provides annual revenues that underpins the company overheads. Sales are growing about 15% PA with margins of nearly 50%. The purchase of the Geovs system provided the platform to bolt on layers and layers of software that gives the company the 'economic moat' for the 'systems' business. This business has the potential to provide enormous revenues with generous margins. The starting point was Bahrain. I suspect that it was the personality of Mr T that persuaded Bahrain to be the first Country to gamble on the SRT system. It was a gamble for Bahrain to buy this system. However, it appears very proud of its purchase and has become the shop window for the SRT system. It appears that all of its neighbours, Saudi, Kuwait etc are going to buy the SRT system and then share information. I don't think the market has woken up to this. The other major triumph for Mr T was persuading the philippines fisheries (BFAR) to buy the SRT system. The first SRT system is currently being installed / commissioned and there is huge potential for follow on contracts, not only with the Philippines but also their neighbours. The driver for the fish monitoring systems is the EU. The EU buys a lot of fish from SE Asia and does not like illegal and unregulated (IUU) fishing. A red card means no exports, hence the need for the SRT system. SRT claims that it has the potential order book for £550 million. Some of these are near term opportunities and some more distant!! Why should countries chose the SRT system? Basically the answer is cost and reliability. The SRT system primarily uses AIS and land based transmitters. Other competitors rely on expensive satellite systems, including iridium. The clever Geovs system collates various information feeds, such as radar, satellite and CCTV. It then 'slices and dices' the information and issues alerts to the operator if something appears illegal. The Geovs system is constantly being upgraded and now includes fish catch reporting. My wife suggests that I have 'rose coloured' spectacles with regard to SRT. I genuinely believe that we are on the cusp of an enormous break through with imminent announcements. I am well aware of the 'jam tomorrow' comment and recognise that PI's have been waiting a long time
countryman5
13/1/2021
08:34
The Qataris have patched up their differences with the neighbours, to an extent in any case. There was a project on the boil down there prior to the big bust-up which was put on the backburner. Maybe that will come back?
lavalmy
12/1/2021
18:31
Bahrain’s Parliament to take action against Qatar over fishing boat incident By Menatalla Ibrahim - December 14, 2020 Perhaps it is time for Bahrain to upgrade its monitoring system.
countryman5
10/1/2021
14:32
The big question is ‘when’ If the question is ‘if’ then you shouldn’t be in this stock
pinkfoot2
10/1/2021
13:23
Well I believe the problems that have been detailed, of negotiating contracts of this sort, complexity and size overseas. They really can't be forced. That doesn't mean they will happen, but there is integrity in the reasons I think, which is more than can be said for some businesses selling a simple product, where they can't even get a foothold in the UK, so they sign up lots of 'partnerships' overseas.
yump
10/1/2021
13:20
The difference being the tech is proven and ready to go. Some tech promises are still on the drawing board
roycecooledge
10/1/2021
13:15
Currently still feels like a "sucker stock" All promises but continually fails to deliver - As for pipeline - equivalent to the man who claims to be developing a more efficient lower cost and higher density battery with a demand pipline of mega billions - Just needs an investment of $100,000,000 to navigate the few months until contracts are signed.
pugugly
10/1/2021
12:10
Hi Countryman5, You won't be able to sell that business an anti-collision device ..." ;-> ATB
extrader
10/1/2021
11:55
Warren Buffet quote:- “The most important thing [is] trying to find a business with a wide and long-lasting moat around it …
countryman5
10/1/2021
10:39
Well there is no doubt that the market has a following wind. Srt just has to get out of the calm water. The only consolation for lack of tangible contract progress for me is that I’ve seen a lot of businesses that take years to get going in relatively new markets after initial investor enthusiasm and then it all takes off. Imo main thing is the expanding potential market and a killer product. Without those nothing spectacular can happen. SRT has both. The rest is down to competition and management, assuming the business is actually viable.
yump
10/1/2021
10:21
Vietnam urged to do more to eliminate IUU fishing by local fishermen By Toan Dao November 25, 2020 Vietnam is being urged to act more forcefully to put an end to illegal activity perpetrated by its fishermen in the exclusive economic zones of neighboring countries, according to Vietfish Magazine on 24 November. Vietnam was first issued a yellow card in October 2017 by the European Commission, which said the Southeast Asian nation had not done enough to eliminate illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Since its imposition, the E.U. has been conducting a review of Vietnam’s fisheries- and seafood-related policies to determine which route it will take out of three options available to it: Maintaining the country’s yellow card status; issuing a red card banning all seafood imports from Vietnam; or rescinding the yellow card and resuming normal trading relations. The two sides had two virtual meetings, in June and October this year, to review Vietnam’s progress, according to the magazine.
countryman5
10/1/2021
10:11
From the Philippines, where the new SRT system is being installed / commissioned:- In 2020 DA-BFAR filed a total of 793 IUUF related cases; 684 cases of which were resolved.
countryman5
10/1/2021
10:08
The Us and EU inland waterways are an enormous market for the SRT 'Environmental Systems' USCG reminds the importance of accurate AIS data entry The Inspections and Compliance Directorate reminds the maritime community that accurate AIS data entry and display is essential to safe navigation. E-NAVIGATION | 15/05/20 A recent collision on the Mississippi River serves as an important reminder that accurate AIS data entry and display is crucial to safe navigation. This is considered an important tool, which provides vessel operators with a clear picture of possible upcoming vessel passing situations. Regarding this incident, prior to sunrise, two towing vessels were approaching a bend on the Mississippi River. Neither vessel was broadcasting the total length overall of their tow to other AIS users. The first vessel’s AIS broadcast showed its length at 72 feet, but the total length of the ship and its two-barge tow was 672 feet. The second vessel’s AIS broadcast showed the length at 200 feet, but the overall length of the vessel and its 40-barge tow was 1,600 feet. Without the information regarding the total length of the other vessel and its tow, the operators did not have a full understanding of the pending passing situation. As the ships rounded the bend and completed their turns, they collided, causing the down bound towing vessel to capsize and sink with several fatalities.
countryman5
08/1/2021
19:46
Ahh!, the mythical VSP, pmsl!!
hjb1
08/1/2021
19:25
Sorry Lav but calling SRT a ‘global technology leader’ with under £4m of t/o in the first half of this year is optimistic.No problem with that but let’s see this VSP convert into real money
pinkfoot2
08/1/2021
17:36
Very unfair comments re C5. He is a long-term holder, convinced of the merits of the company with nothing to gain from ramping the share price. He has made some extremely valuable contributions to this board, most memorably when he sniffed out the original BFAR invitation to bid. Other posters have made no relevant contributions.
lavalmy
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