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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Srt Marine Systems Plc LSE:SRT London Ordinary Share GB00B0M8KM36 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 35.75 35.00 36.50 35.75 35.75 35.75 22,522 08:00:02
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 18.9 -6.9 -3.9 - 59

Srt Marine Systems Share Discussion Threads

Showing 26201 to 26224 of 26500 messages
Chat Pages: 1060  1059  1058  1057  1056  1055  1054  1053  1052  1051  1050  1049  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
24/1/2021
14:21
Agreed but showing another year with a loss on limited turnover will be unhelpful.Cash wise they seem fine for time being
pinkfoot2
24/1/2021
14:17
Pinkfoot Remember there are no forecasts to miss or hit. The only real unknown is payments/milestones/revenue recognition on the BFAR contract. I can't remember what I worked out a while ago on that. £9-10 million of revenue left plus £5-6 million in receivables? It looks like the UK will not be letting people travel freely for a few more months. These vaccine passports seem to be good idea, if it is shown that vaccines reduce transmissibility. Most boffins seem to think that they should.
lavalmy
24/1/2021
13:30
Good defence Lav but the real defence is sales and contracts.It’s only two months to year end again
pinkfoot2
24/1/2021
10:52
Maybe not everyone who reads this board knows what one is, but here is SRT's base station. hTTps://srt-marine.com/product/base-station/base-station/ Not quite as simple as finding a socket to plug it into, but not that scary a piece of kit either.
lavalmy
24/1/2021
05:22
Monkey Island I am not selling anything. In general, the range of AIS is much greater. You can make various assumptions about the distribution of boats both in terms of distance from the shore and distance from populated areas. In the more populated areas, the GSM range will be significantly reduced. On the other hand, range will be best in remote locations with few phone users and expensive maintenance. The Philippines has about 120 AIS base ststions (which they own) - small, not very expensive and I don't think they need much maintenance, just reliable power supplies. Nor is putting in the infrastructure that difficult. In the Philippines, the 15 type one regional stations are more challenging, with RADAR etc. But that is not AIS related. So maybe, at best, GSM can pick up 50% of the vessels and AIS a further 25% (or 40%/35% whatever). The AIS transponders do not need to have a contract with the GSM provider. Then you have the satellite coverage witb data charges for each transmission as opposed to bulk purchase of all AIS signals captured. Adding an extra actor (normally a state telco) into the mix would more likely slow the process down as well. Lastly, but not least, enforcement assets can go out and catch miscreants, tracking them on their AIS, which is impossible with a GSM/Sat hybrid.
lavalmy
23/1/2021
22:52
LaValmy your comment on CLS hybrid GSM/Sat AIS vs SRT basestation/Sat AIS and SRT wiping the floor with the opposition seems a little unbalanced. This sounds like a sales pitch? I would think that both approaches have relative merits and disadvantages? Having to install manage and support through life a base station network does not come without costs and issues. How long to get good coverage (depending on the geography of the country?), quality of service, who owns this (customers or SRT?). Using the already available cellular network removes this burden albeit at a cost. It enables the ability to remotely connect and support users (something base station AIS is not designed for). In this current Covid environment using all ready available infrastructure and networks would seem a pretty smart move in my book. Delivery of projects would only be limited to how quickly you can install on vessels, rather than installing supporting infrastructure. If SRT had adopted this GSM / Sat hybrid approach perhaps some projects would be further down the road than they are now?
monkeyisland
22/1/2021
17:33
I don't think mesh handling is much to do with hardware, it's about switching data, which I would guess is all done by software these days. If it's discouraged that's a pity - it's a very valuable characteristic of the network, and in an ideal world would be encouraged. I assume that's only because of transmission speed limits, or perhaps backward compatibility? Maybe, just as SRT can extend the satellite transmission to Class B by proprietary means, they could do the same with mesh protocols on their own kit?
supernumerary
22/1/2021
16:09
Sorry, been out most of today in the rather fine weather we have had for this time of year. Shorts on and all. Well, AIS is a bit ambivalent on this mesh business. Yes it can operate as a mesh, or partial mesh, but it is highly discouraged. If you hark back to the original collision avoidance purpose, if your system is not receiving a message from a ship about to hit you, either the message is wrong or your AIS isn't working properly. Routing a faulty message or a corect one to your faulty AIS device is not going change that. And the authorities wanted to limit the ability of the devices to repeat messages which are by design limited to their slots. After all, you wouldn't want a message being routed from 100 miles away on the same slot as that used by the ship you might hit close by. There are occasions when it is used and the AToN's can have a repeater functionality, SOS messages and some system management things, but overall discouraged. The satellites do it all the time, relaying everything to wherever they beam it down, but then if your satellite is about to hit a boat then it is in catastrophically low orbit with a footprint of a large puddle.
lavalmy
21/1/2021
22:55
Mesh networks require expensive radios to enable this kind of wideband communication. AIS is limited to the frequencies that are assigned for the system. If systems start forming mesh networks then the frequencies required would be outside that allocated for AIS. This and MANET is the realm of the military and whilst technically achievable would be beyond SRTs market entry price point and the pockets of the customers it targets.
monkeyisland
20/1/2021
20:56
In theory the mesh network of AIS should provide much greater coverage than any point-to-point system. So, for instance, if your boat is out of reach of a satellite or coastal station, another one in the mesh may not be, hence your communication is still assured. But whether the AIS protocols (+SRT specials!) can do this sort of thing, I've no idea.
supernumerary
20/1/2021
16:57
I have just been informing myself about the differences between a hybrid GSM/satellite system as touted by CLS (and I have seen others mentioned) and SRT's hybrid AIS base station/Satellite AIS system. Much clarity was given by the powers that be at MSN towers. GSM doesn't go out as far, maybe 10 nm. Although it is equally radio, mobile phone networks try to reuse their spectrum as often as they can. Each call is on two frequencies (and often a third is used to manage it) and the signal is powered so that it will not interfere with a call on the same frequency in the next cell [All that is my very own understanding]. Hence the limited range. AIS, on only two frequencies worldwide, instead splits the time into cleverly managed slots and only has line of sight limitations. A good estimate is that 75% of the fishing boats would not go out of range of the base stations. With GSM a lot fewer. So with a GSM/Satellite hybrid, CLS would be hoping to get data charges for quite of large percentage of the boats, expensively too, although we have not yet seen their pricing. Customers would also have to have a deal with the GSM operator. With SRT's system, it is mostly free apart from the satellite fill-in. And that is where is gets very interesting. The satellite providers don't know how many boats are being tracked. They just receive signals (encrypted at that). And they charge by area, so you can buy e.g. the Western Pacific for a fixed sum. If required SRT can add on a non-AIS system, but that is rarely needed. The success or failure of getting a signal comes down more to the transponders than the satellite operator - although some are better than others, our friends at eE for example. So the more transponders SRT has out there, the lower the cost per unit. Hence they can wipe the floor with anyone. Neat, really.
lavalmy
20/1/2021
15:24
Nice bounce off the bottom of the up-trend channel- if we can bust through 45p on this rise that would be good
lfc4ever
18/1/2021
12:59
A bit of a stop-hunt there....?
extrader
17/1/2021
16:46
Hi Countryman5, .."negotiations with very wealthy Qatar.." Had they got very far ? OT : Back in the 80's I used to spend Fridays in Bahrain with the family out at Jarada sand-bar, half-way between it and Qatar. The sand-bar was pristine, disappearing twice a day with the tide. Usually, we had the place to ourselves apart from a CoastGuard vessel - one week Bahraini, the next Qatari, taking it in turns to do a little harmless willy-waving. Life was less complicated back then ! ATB
extrader
15/1/2021
13:04
Precisely C5 and let's not forget that in all the kerfuffle the project had to be re-tendered adding months of delay. Closest thing to bribing a country to buy your kit - hardly ethical behaviour from our near neighbour.
alter ego
15/1/2021
11:08
Hi Countryman5, Thanks for clarifying! ATB
extrader
15/1/2021
10:17
The French no longer have a pleasant smell in SE Asia and CLS is on the back foot. Unfortunately for CLS their satellite offering is too expensive. Those here with memories will remember that CLS were expecting the BFAR contract with the Philippines. The French government were putting up the money and one of the conditions was that the contract had to go to a french company. My understanding was that SRT created a french company and was awarded the contract. France refused to fund the contract. The Philippines refused to be bullied by France and found the money internally and the rest is history.
countryman5
15/1/2021
10:03
I am hoping that as soon as we get confirmation of the large ME contract, Finncap will produce a research note. The last one (sept 2020) referred to the various ME contracts and said 'These contracts could see FY 2021 revenue exceed £50m with adj PBT in double figures'. I note that Kuwait has had an election and this could result in a change of minister, plus contract delay. We are now less than 3 months from year end and after the ME contract Richard should have good visibility for the year end. I suspect that a lot of the kit for the contract, including screens and software are all ready to go. This will allow for an early slug of revenue to go to MSN. There should have been substantial revenue from Immems 2 with BFAR. It is unlikely that we will learn a lot about year end 2022, except that it should be larger than 2021. I am hoping that Finncap will give a guide on how the transceiver business is going. I am hoping for good news, despite covid. I am also hoping to hear about the new AIS product that is being developed.
countryman5
15/1/2021
08:51
I’m lost mate-what do you mean?
pinkfoot2
14/1/2021
23:20
I think investors can be forgiven for thinking they’re in a real life version of Groundhog Day.
yump
14/1/2021
21:56
Ffs it is an ais transponder surely?
yumyum
14/1/2021
20:14
Our French friends haven't gone away, it seems... https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2020/12/05/a-device-called-nemo-will-shed-light-on-small-scale-fisherfolk A device called Nemo will shed light on small-scale fisherfolk No one knows the size of their catch Fish are being plundered from the ocean at an alarming rate. According to the un Food and Agriculture Organisation some 90m tonnes of commercial catch are hauled from the sea every year. And that is only for legitimate, commercial fishing vessels. Even setting aside the huge amount of illegal fishing that goes on, few authorities monitor the activities of the 50m or so fisherfolk who operate small boats in local waters with the aim of feeding their families, or of selling their catch harbourside or into local markets. So an attempt is now under way to collect some of these missing data. The combined catch of such small-scale fishing could be half as much again as the reported global catch, according to Michel Dejean, director of sustainable fisheries for cls Group. cls is a subsidiary of France’s space agency that, among other things, helps monitor, via satellite, the transponders on large fishing boats operating around the world. (Those that switch off their transponders are tracked by radar.) For small craft, though, cls requires something simpler and cheaper. This is where the group’s experience in another area has come in useful—for the organisation also tracks marine birds and sea mammals, and for this it employs low-powered transponders. Engineers at cls have used that expertise to come up with Nemo, a self-contained transponder powered by a built-in solar panel, since many small fishing boats do not have electrical power on board. Nemo is about the size of a shoe. Once attached to a boat, it transmits its position either via satellite or, if within range of local services, mobile phone. Working with local fishery authorities and other organisations in Asia and South America, cls hopes to have deployed around 1,000 Nemos by the end of 2020. Costs are still being worked out, but the price of such a transponder is generally a few hundred dollars. That compares with several thousand for the sorts of system fitted to large commercial boats. Local fishing groups are also likely to come up with their own schemes to supply or lease the units. From cls’s point of view the idea is that, by knowing when a vessel has put to sea and where it has been fishing, it will be possible to build up a clearer picture of how small-scale fisheries operate in particular places. Also, reported catches can be verified against vessels’ actual locations. For this to stand any chance of working, however, fisherfolk must be persuaded that they, too, have an interest in having a Nemo attached to their boat. To do this, says Mr Dejean, means building a good safety and business case. As far as safety is concerned, fish-depleted inshore waters mean that many people are being forced to sail farther out to sea—often beyond mobile-phone range. This scuppers their only way of contacting home if something goes wrong. Nemo’s satellite connection overcomes that, and, to make doubly sure, the device is fitted with a single-button distress beacon which can summon help in a crisis. As to commercial incentive, the record of fishing grounds visited will, cls hopes, allow crews to obtain higher prices from concerned customers by proving their catches come from “sustainable” sources. Whether either of these baits will, in practice, hook enough of the world’s small fisherfolk remains to be seen. But even if only a few sign up, it may help plug a worrying hole in the planet’s fishery data. ■ =========== For more coverage of climate change, register for The Climate Issue, our fortnightly newsletter, or visit our climate-change hub This article appeared in the Science & technology section of the print edition under the headline "The ones that got away"
supernumerary
14/1/2021
19:59
I thought the US was the security patron of the Middle East-probably less so in recent years?
pinkfoot2
14/1/2021
18:04
Hi Countryman5, Great write-up, tks ! My only quibble would be where you write .."The driver for the fish monitoring systems is the EU. The EU buys a lot of fish from SE Asia and does not like illegal and unregulated (IUU) fishing. A red card means no exports, hence the need for the SRT system..." There's a French alternative, AIUI, not sure if it has sufficient capabilities to be 'in the frame', especially if the EU/French were to hint that buying from them would be 'helpful' in getting any 'red card' lifted ? This may sound like paranoia, but we've recently witnessed French foot-dragging on covid vaccine purchase and roll-out to favour their national champion, Sanofi. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/06/eu-approves-moderna-vaccine-tensions-slow-rollout .."Berlin has also come in for wider European criticism over its decision to reach a bilateral deal with BioNTech for an additional 30 million doses, while Paris has been accused in Germany of insisting that the EU buy less of the German firm’s vaccine in favour of one being developed by France’s Sanofi*..." * which has since been delayed, but that's another kettle of (ahem) fish... A country that's prepared to play politics with its own people's lives wouldn't , IMO, be above strong-arming some distant foreigners. ATB
extrader
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