Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Plant Health Care LSE:PHC London Ordinary Share GB00B01JC540 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.05p -0.33% 15.20p 14.50p 15.90p 15.00p 15.00p 15.00p 35,000 16:35:29
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Chemicals 5.7 -4.2 -3.0 - 26.27

Plant Health Care Share Discussion Threads

Showing 576 to 600 of 600 messages
Chat Pages: 24  23  22  21  20  19  18  17  16  15  14  13  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
30/7/2018
12:34
Today's update isn't really news: much the same was in the recent trading statement 16 July 2018. I shouldn't have thought the share price would be affected. I would agree, however, that positive news is welcoming.
trcml
30/7/2018
07:31
Today's update is welcome news, and the yield results, which are excellent, will surely pique further interest. Regarding the prospects for Harpin in coffee, Brazil was ranked first among the leading coffee-producing countries worldwide in 2017. Coffee is of course grown elsewhere, so the potential market is very large. It will also be very interesting see what other crops can benefit from the application of Harpin !
wan
27/7/2018
08:45
Aside from PHC's own findings, I have highlighted other scientific findings that provide strong evidence for the use of peptides in agriculture. I found the following recent findings very interesting indeed, but the work is on-going to better understand the results. I am no scientist, but I wonder whether the ultimate effect was in part, or in full because of the peptides naturally produced by probiotics. Probiotics effect several actions, one being the production of different antimicrobial metabolites such as peptides (e.g. ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides). Fertilizer destroys plant microbiome’s ability to protect against disease By Robert Sanders, Media relations | JULY 26, 2018 A new study of the role microbial communities play on the leaves of plants suggests that fertilizing crops may make them more susceptible to disease. UC Berkeley biologists found that spraying tomatoes with microbes from healthy tomatoes protected them from disease-causing bacteria, but that fertilizing the tomatoes beforehand negated the protection, leading to an increase in the population of pathogenic microbes on the plants’ leaves. While the researchers don’t yet know whether the increased number of bad bacteria on the leaves actually makes the tomatoes sick, the study clearly shows that fertilizer throws the community of microbes on the leaves off-balance. That potentially could allow disease-causing organisms to enter the plant. “When we change the nutrient environment that plants are in, we are fundamentally altering the plant-microbiome interaction and also, importantly, the microbiome-mediated protection of natural plant/microbe interactions,” said senior author Britt Koskella, a UC Berkeley assistant professor of integrative biology. The fertilizer effect was not the only surprise from the study, Koskella said. She and co-author Maureen Berg, a graduate student, were investigating how the density of the microbial community on the leaves affected the plants’ resistance to disease and discovered that a lower dose of beneficial microbes sprayed on the leaves was often more effective in protecting the plants from infection than higher doses. Berg sprayed leaves with an artificial microbial community composed of 12 species of bacteria taken from the natural microbiome of healthy tomatoes. “We found that the most protective community was the most dilute, the least concentrated, the lowest dose,” she said. “This was completely nonintuitive. A medium dose gave medium protection and the highest dose was the least protective.” Probiotics for plants The reasons are unclear, but the findings are important because organic farmers are talking about spraying crops with probiotics to encourage better growth and disease protection, in the same way that humans consume probiotics containing “good” microbes in hopes of improving their health. “The fact that we saw this lower-dose/higher-protection effect suggests it is not as simple as just throwing on more microbes,” Koskella said. “There is a lot of work to be done understanding how to apply a plant probiotic.” She and Berg will report their findings in the Aug. 6 print edition of the journal Current Biology; the article will be posted online July 26. Koskella focuses on plants’ above-ground microbiomes, or the phyllosphere, a poorly understood community compared to the well-studied below-ground microbiome associated with plant roots, the rhizosphere. Researchers are finding unsuspected activity within phyllosphere microbes, including that some of the bacteria fix nitrogen from the air like root-associated bacteria. Many studies have demonstrated that microbial communities in the roots can promote plants’ nutrient uptake, growth and resistance to disease, and Koskella is investigating whether this also holds true for the above-ground microbiome. Her experiments are relevant to the issue of treating crops with probiotics, and could help answer questions such as: What is the right mix of bacteria for a given plant? What is the best way to apply this proper mix? To investigate these questions, Koskella and Berg began by sampling the natural leaf microbes of healthy tomatoes grown in outdoor fields at UC Davis. They then sprayed the mix on sterile tomato plants in growth chambers at UC Berkeley and, one week later, injected the leaves with Pseudomonas syringae bacteria, which cause tomato speck, a major problem that’s treated with pesticides. The new microbial community on the tomatoes did, in fact, protect the plants from colonization by pathogens, though the microbial communities obtained from some tomato fields worked better than the microbiomes from other fields. “This phyllosphere microbial community, much like our own skin, is a first line of defense against disease, so we expected to see protection, though we didn’t know for sure,” Koskella said. Artificial microbial communities Surprisingly, when they varied the concentration of microbes sprayed on the leaves, they found that in many cases low dosages worked better than high dosages. To find out why, they constructed an artificial microbial community composed of 12 of the species found on natural plants — basically, the 12 that grew best in culture. When they sprayed various dosages of the synthetic community on tomatoes, they got the same result: low, diluted doses were more protective against Pseudomonas than were high, concentrated doses. Berg repeated the experiment to confirm the puzzling findings, but during one subsequent trial she decided to fertilize the droopy plants first. In that trial, none of the microbiome doses were protective against Pseudomonas. When they repeated the trial with and without fertilization, they confirmed that application of fertilizer abolished the protective effects previously observed. In each experiment, they judged protection against pathogens by recording the relative population of Pseudomonas compared to the other, mostly beneficial microbes, since a healthy microbiome should effectively compete with a pathogen and knock it down to low levels. Koskella has suspicions about why fertilizer alters the microbiome, top among them the possibility that the nutrients make healthier leaves, which keeps all the microbes happy and obviates the need for the good microbes to out-compete the bad microbes. She and her group are now pursuing experiments to test that hypothesis. They still have no idea why probiotic treatment at low dosages works better than high doses, but hope that future research can solve this mystery and help guide the suitable application of probiotics in agriculture. Nevertheless, Koskella and Berg said, the impact of fertilizer on the leaf and stem microbiome should lead biologists to explore fertilizer’s effect on the root microbiome as well, and on the general health of the plant. “We have been fertilizing crops for so long it would surprise me if we haven’t already seen consequences of long-term fertilization on how plants interact with their microbes,” she said. “There are a lot of studies that show domesticated plants tend to have very different microbial communities than their wild relatives.” The big questions are, does that affect the plant’s overall health, and why? Koskella is one of the leaders of a new UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab joint initiative to put microbiome studies on a firmer scientific foundation, emphasizing reproducible experiments and testable theories and drawing upon the campus’s expertise in ecology, evolution, environmental science, the interactions between pathogens and their hosts, data science and cutting-edge genomics technology. The newly published research was funded by UC Berkeley and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (DGE 1106400) to Berg. Source - hxxp://news.berkeley.edu/2018/07/26/fertilizer-destroys-plant-microbiomes-ability-to-protect-against-disease/ The other interesting element from the above scientific findings was the improved effect from a lower dosage, which I think PHC may have also noticed in recent trial results (my interpretation). In any regard, the evidence supporting the use of biorationals in agriculture is adding momentum to the direction of travel!
wan
19/7/2018
13:18
Written Q&A for the DT interview for ease - http://bit.ly/2uz0uDx
astonedt
19/7/2018
07:56
Thanks Astonedt, that adds weight to my thoughts in post 37.
wan
18/7/2018
17:06
CEO interview with DirectorsTalk discussing the performance of its commercial products, becoming cash positive, Innatus 3G licensing and developments in trials on other PREtec peptides http://bit.ly/2zVJEDE
astonedt
17/7/2018
07:44
With PHC's commercial business now on a firm growth track (on track for a 30% increase over 2017) and with the PREtec technology platform still generating positive results and 'continued' interest, I think it's likely that some form of technology development agreement could be entered into. If this came to fruition, and depending on the percentage of the R&D the partner was responsible for, this could fast track PHC toward break-even/profitability (R&D in 2017 was $5.1 million). The following comment from the Trading Statement is perhaps indicative - "Outside Brazil, our partners continue to generate positive results with PREtec peptides. While the specific results remain confidential at this stage, partners are seeking to expand their evaluations and build closer relationships with Plant Health Care."
wan
16/7/2018
09:03
Harpin alone likely covers the current market cap.
wigwammer
16/7/2018
08:46
The IP is where the value is maybe not right now but a few years down the line.They also have many years of data so any price above and beyond what RG paid for the placing /buyout shares looks a good place to start all IMHO of course.
riddlerone
16/7/2018
08:38
Without soyabean success what's it worth???
zipstuck
16/7/2018
08:23
I think there is some value here for one of the big six (soon to be 5 )and with RG in control with his large holding it wouldn't be a great shock to see them bought out.No real reason to invest here as that could be many months away and by their own conviction don't expect any licenses to be sold soon.
riddlerone
16/7/2018
07:58
A mixed bag! A disappointment in ASR, but I still believe the peptide approach will result in benefits to agriculture, indeed as indicated. Importantly, the yield results continue to generate interest from the large players, not to mention supportive scientific evidence. Off-setting the disappointment is that significant growth in revenues will be realised, with further growth forecast going forwards.
wan
16/7/2018
07:23
Jam tomorrow - increasing yields on sugar cane as sugar prices are falling??
zipstuck
16/7/2018
07:17
Well unfortunately yet again more delays so consider the can being kicked.
riddlerone
12/7/2018
08:38
Recall that PHC's PREtec technology platforms ultimately regulate the genes in plants. Readers will note the reference to gene regulation in the following article. The company ultimately being interviewed is a large player in the US; Weeding Out the Noise in the Biostimulant Space 6th June 2018 "If we can use a product to upregulate or downregulate some genes, that’s something we’re starting to look at with a number of suppliers. We can track how we’re affecting a plant’s genetic expression. These are all in the R&D phase now. Things have certainly been ramped up in the last few years, which I think is good. That’s the natural evolution of things. We can see some yield and quality responses, but I don’t know if we can tell you why they did what they did. Now, we’re really starting to dive in to figuring out the ‘whys,’ especially with the next-generation products." "We’re looking at newer products that trigger, or upregulate or downregulate a gene within a plant. So that’s kind of the frontier." "I do see some real promising things on the frontier with companies using available technology to show activation of a gene within a plant, salt tolerance, and things like that. This is real and relevant within our space. I’m glad to see things moving in a more scientific direction." Full article https://tinyurl.com/Biostimulants-gene-regulation
wan
04/7/2018
07:51
There has been (and still is) a lot of interesting reports and activity on PHC's twitter feed. The teams appear to be 'very' ProAct®ive on different continents ;-) https://tinyurl.com/Plant-Health-Care-Twitter
wan
26/6/2018
10:30
Funding again???
zipstuck
26/6/2018
10:27
Wan agreed, but Mr Market has an uncanny knack of being right more often than not - As we know too well to our cost from PIM (amongst many others) - Have a great week.
pugugly
26/6/2018
07:55
Pugugly...Not everything is a sign of bad news!
wan
25/6/2018
15:18
News leaking ? Perhaps very bad news? As now down 10% today on increasing volume. Down 16.7% over 3 days on constant faller list.
pugugly
15/6/2018
07:09
New Market Insights for Crop Biologics June 13, 2018 American agriculture is undergoing a new wave of productivity and enhanced sustainability. While many previous advances focused on enhancing a plant’s internal ability to overcome natural challenges, this next wave focuses on the critical interactions between plants and the surrounding microbiome. In recent years, there has been a renewed emphasis on improving soil health. This next wave focuses on the interactions between a growing crop and the microbial community in and around the soil. This is an incredibly complex endeavor to identify those microbes that are beneficial in improving yield, increasing nutrient efficiency, improving abiotic stress tolerance or protecting against harmful pests and diseases. A recently released business study “Plant Microbiome, The Next Wave in Agriculture?,” conducted by BioCognito and Farmgate Insights, takes a multifaceted look at this expanding field of agriculture. Microbial additives or “biologics” are becoming an important approach for farmers looking for ways to manage production challenges. Companies across the agricultural spectrum are investing heavily in this new wave. Over the past five years, there has been more than $5 billion of disclosed investment in this space. “We have seen multinationals form new alliances, well known crop protection and nutrient companies purchase startups, and an explosion of innovators, all trying to be a part of the action” said Nathan Danielson, one of the report’s authors. “Companies that didn’t exist 5 and 10 years ago are raising ten of millions of dollars, and one has recently attained ‘Unicorn’ status. Meanwhile, traditional agriculture companies are pursuing different strategies such as bundling biologics with a whole suite of products or tying them with existing crop protection and fertilizers.” While the use of biologics in specialty crops and the organic industry are ahead of row crops, with over 250 million acres planted annually this is a huge potential market. “One of our study goals was to look at the five primary field crops in the U.S. (corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton and sorghum) and analyze their unique barriers to entry and potential delivery systems for biologics,” stated co-author Paul Bertels. “We have talked with a number of growers and commodity organizations to get their perspectives on what do want to enhance adoption.” In support of the study, the authors have created an interactive cost-benefit model for each crop to help farmers or industry assess the value of a new product. “Our models indicate value creation in excess of $8.5 billion in farmgate revenue for these five crops in the US alone. This value is largely driven by yield increases and the ability to utilize marginal land, however a number of other drivers were important. According to co-author Nathan Danielson “We used conservative assumptions in our models and still saw very significant new value creation. Beyond this, there were specific geographies and market sectors that were really exciting opportunities”. The reward for capturing market share is enormous. Corn, cotton, soybeans, sorghum and wheat represent a significant opportunity for crop biologics. The market study “Plant Microbiome: The Next Wave in Agriculture” provides the reader with a clear understanding of the landscape of the market place. This is accomplished through analysis on market structure and barriers to entry as well insights into market participants and those who may enter. Finally, customizable models are provided to readers to allow value determination for specific crops and geographies. https://tinyurl.com/Insights-for-Crop-Biologics
wan
13/6/2018
08:45
PHC's Brazil Director, Rodrigo de Miranda, will be speaking at the following congress - Biopesticides and biostimulants / biofertilizers are growing in demand. With Latin America being a world hub for agriculture it is no surprise that these products are seeing rapid growth. Agbio Innovate LATAM is focussed on R&D, regulation and commercialization of biopesticides and biofertilizers/ biostimulants in Latin America, and unites key stakeholders across the globe. Developing a new generation of products Moving from the traditional chemical market to biologicals Challenges faced and how we managed this Rodrigo de Miranda, Brazil Director, Plant Health Care, Brazil https://tinyurl.com/LATAM-Biologicals-Congress
wan
31/5/2018
13:14
wan - many thanks for link - much appreciated - may explain the sP movement -
pugugly
30/5/2018
07:57
PHC Investor Presentation, US , 25th May 2018 - https://tinyurl.com/PHC-Results-US-Presentation
wan
18/5/2018
07:58
Recall from my post 17 that Spain is the biggest purveyor of fresh fruits in Europe. The following PHC presentaion is interesting then and is from the International Symposium on Citrus Biotechnology in April 2018 - Mobilizing Ca to enhance fruit quality: Ángel Marín, Plant Health Care S.A. Spain. amarin@planthealthcare.com K. Staska, A. Dillon. Application of harpin αβ (ProAct®) in citrus orchards in Spain https://tinyurl.com/PHC-Citrus-Presentation
wan
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