Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
National Grid LSE:NG. London Ordinary Share GB00B08SNH34 ORD 11 17/43P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +2.40p +0.25% 974.30p 974.00p 974.20p 976.10p 965.30p 970.00p 1,550,818.00 12:25:24
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Gas Water & Utilities 15,115.0 3,032.0 69.0 14.1 36,616.60

National Grid Share Discussion Threads

Showing 4826 to 4849 of 4850 messages
Chat Pages: 194  193  192  191  190  189  188  187  186  185  184  183  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
15/2/2017
21:27
It is a Punt either way At least it's a 5% dividend if you stay in
gutterhead
13/2/2017
14:47
Still wondering whether to sell before the split and special dividend then buy back in afterwards considering that the share price will probably fall by at least and probably more than, the same amount. Looking at the current share price performance it doesn't seem to be a particularly attractive proposition to buyers.
warranty
13/2/2017
14:32
This is an excellent Bullitin Board one of the few where you can have civilised dicussion.
atlantic57
13/2/2017
13:13
The trouble with a hostile posting is that it tends to kill off any sort of debate. Sometimes you just need to hold your ire, for the greater benefit.
septimus quaid
13/2/2017
13:03
Champain, As Bountyhunter states, the discussion is relevant to NG as investors would like to explore what to do with many thousands of pounds as a result of the special divi that is going to be paid (approx 80p / share). No one likes to pay additional tax do they?
utyinv
13/2/2017
12:26
most posts here are about NG directly from some highly knowledgeable contributors however this was an aside about moving NG shares into tax effective wrappers such as ISAs and SIPPs, there is no need to be so judgmental!
bountyhunter
12/2/2017
16:02
yes but rather over complicated to say the least and what about the over 50s, a clear case of ageism in my view especially with the retirement age getting higher all the time; even if you are 50 you should be able to get the same benefits towards a retirement that may not start until approaching 70 for many
bountyhunter
12/2/2017
00:07
Re: Lifetime ISA Info: Q: Who can take advantage? From April 2017, anyone aged from 18 to below 40 will be able to open a Lifetime ISA. While you are under 50 you can then contribute up to £4,000 a year and receive an added 25% government bonus. This means for every £4 contributed, the government will add a further £1 (up to a maximum of £1,000 a year). Q: Who has it been designed for? The Lifetime ISA is designed for people looking to save for their first home and/or retirement. SAVING FOR YOUR FIRST HOUSE You can use the funds in the Lifetime ISA (including the government’s bonus) to buy your first home in the UK costing up to £450,000. You will need to have had the Lifetime ISA open for at least 12 months in order to qualify for the government’s bonus. This means you should be looking to purchase your first property after 6 April 2018 at the earliest. Each individual under 40 can open a Lifetime ISA meaning two first time buyers (e.g. couples) can both benefit from their bonus when they buy together. In most cases, the individual must intend to occupy the property as their only or main residence.
utyinv
11/2/2017
23:18
Bounty, Gov contributing far less. Each person under 40 can open an account and contribute up to 50 yrs of age via regular payments during each year up to £4000/yr with Gov giving a 25% bonus so £5000 in total value. But then of the £5000 / yr the £1000 given by the Gov equates to only 20% of the amount in the total kitty. However, if the young person already has a house then it has to be used for future pensions. It has been called a CON, because its not as good as it has been portrayed. Each person can already contribute to a pension up to a larger amount per yr with pension tax relief at his/her nominal rate (20%, 40% or 45%). There is also still some debate about exit charges with the LISA along with losing the bonus too (treat it as a form of Stealth tax) if the contributor takes it out for a purpose other than Gov requirements.
utyinv
11/2/2017
23:04
The LISA proceeds have to be used to either buy your first house or to be used as part of your pension. Otherwise taxed at a phenomenal rate to penalise those taking it out for anything else. There was a piece in the press awhile ago and discussed on BBC r4
utyinv
11/2/2017
12:59
...even more restrictive then, smacks of ageism given that the government is contributing 33%! but at least the over 40s have the option of some NG shares in a sipp or isa as part of their pension scheme :-)
bountyhunter
11/2/2017
12:30
Under 40 for a LISA
prewar
11/2/2017
12:02
...can't touch the money until retirement (not sure what age) without losing the extra cash and tax benefit and have to be less than 50 to open it? correct me if I'm wrong as that is just what I recollect
bountyhunter
11/2/2017
09:39
It's 33%.If that's what a lifetime ISA is it looks phenomenal.It looks so good from what you said, is that the full story, you put in 3k, the gov put in 1k? There must be a bit more to it.
pierre oreilly
11/2/2017
04:26
My son is 31.Just helping him build a Pension pot.I have a SIPP also which I will leave to him.The problem with the SIPP is you have to pay tax on the Drawdown.With the ISA no tax to pay.By the time he is 50.He will have a minimum £400,000 plus dividends and growth.And hopefully be able to retire.By the way I am 58 an Expat living in the Far East for over 8 years and retired.Also what does anyone think of the Lifetime ISA,with £3,000 a year and the Government giving you a £1,000,so 25% on your money !!!
garycook
10/2/2017
16:30
Pierre - "I don't think someone else could just send a cheque to deposit into my isa account (anyone want to try?)" Happy to give it a go, you send me a cheque for £20K and I'll pay it into my ISA on April 6th. - If my broker rejects it I'll let you know (Bear in mind the mail from some of those Caribean Islands can take a long time !!!)
losos
10/2/2017
12:31
Pierre, I think you are right when it comes to your own ISA but wrong when talking about a Junior ISA. In the latter case, I know that someone other than the parent(s), say a grandparent, can subscribe to it. My broker, HL, record who is making the contribution, inform the parent and I guess HMRC too.
alter ego
10/2/2017
11:47
My broker will only accept isa deposits from the original account i opened the isa with, which they checked and checked was mine. (money laundering regs apparantly) I don't think someone else could just send a cheque to deposit into my isa account (anyone want to try?). I opened one for me and the misses when they first came out, and had tessas, peps, tossas and whatver else came before them, from the first year they were available. They used to have major benefits (like reclaiming the notional tax on divis), but now, for most people, i really don't see a great advantage opening one today, and maybe not enough advantages to cover the various fees. I've put two lots of the max possible every year since they and their predecessors opened, and now the tax advantages for me are massive. And great that they aren't mentioned at all on tax forms.
pierre oreilly
10/2/2017
11:33
GARYCOOK - "but I am financing it." Seems to me the Bank of Mum & Dad is expanding rapidly, if it ever goes public I might buy some shares in it ;-)
losos
10/2/2017
03:37
Thanks everyone.You have all confirmed what I thought.The ISA is my Son,s but I am financing it.
garycook
09/2/2017
13:19
Garycook - As Gateside & Septimus have said the new money I intend to put in after April 6th. will be part of my ISA at least that is how my broker organises it. They also tell me each year how much I've put in and it is all one account with them. I look at it like Septimus said, it's a subscription limit for my one and only ISA.
losos
09/2/2017
09:55
Losos, Only pleased I could help and it's worked out well for you :)
utyinv
09/2/2017
08:35
The relationship with your current ISA provider is, or can be, an indefinite thing. The £20k (17/18) is best thought of as an annual subscription limit.
septimus quaid
09/2/2017
07:03
Gary... you will be able to invest the money in your current ISA
gateside
Chat Pages: 194  193  192  191  190  189  188  187  186  185  184  183  Older
Your Recent History
LSE
GKP
Gulf Keyst..
LSE
QPP
Quindell
FTSE
UKX
FTSE 100
LSE
IOF
Iofina
FX
GBPUSD
UK Sterlin..
Stocks you've viewed will appear in this box, letting you easily return to quotes you've seen previously.

Register now to create your own custom streaming stock watchlist.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P:41 V: D:20170224 12:40:33