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Lloyds Share Price (LLOY)

Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +2.48p +4.43% 58.48p 58.36p 58.45p 58.48p 56.58p 57.09p 154,478,598 16:35:19
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m) RN NRN
Banks 29,892.0 1,762.0 1.7 34.4 41,739.36

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DateSubject
06/1/2015
10:00
gotnorolex: Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) shares appear to be at risk of sliding lower with current momentum indicators confirming the downside is preferred. The decline must be seen in the context of the longer-term sideways trend, defined by an upside limit at 77p and the downside support line at around 70p. The LLOY share price has been caught in this region since early 2014 which confirms to us just how entrenched these levels have become. December did see a break above 77p and many in the market would have seen this as a sign that a positive breakout had occured. However, the stalling in buying interest saw the Lloyds share price fall back into range. As such we would not be surprised to see the bottom end of the range at 70p come into play. Lloyds Bank stock is currently priced below its 20 and 50 day Moving Averages located at at 77.42 and 77.26. The RSI is below 50 and the MACD is negative and below its signal line which confirms to us that buying interest remains soft. hTTp://www.thecsuite.co.uk/CFO/index.php/finance/207-lloyds-and-barclays-shares-barc-lloy-454354
05/8/2015
13:36
m4rtinu: So not only is Osborne losing vast amounts on the sale of RBS shares, he has now contributed to the fall in LLOY share price and is losing, perhaps as much as 5p share on any further LLOY sale. Purely idiologically driven decision on RBS in my view.
08/1/2016
09:14
broadwood: Will Lloyds Banking Group PLC Rise By 100% This Year? (Who would print a headline like that?) You've got it. Lets hope he's right It’s rare to find a stock in the FTSE 350 that trades on a single-digit price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio. It’s even rarer to find one that’s highly profitable and has the potential to grow its earnings and dividends at a rapid rate. However, that’s exactly the circumstances in which Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) currently finds itself, with the part-nationalised bank having the potential to double during the course of 2016. Clearly, for any stock to double in price requires a significant shift upwards in investor sentiment. And while the UK economy is performing relatively well, the outlook for the global economy remains uncertain due to a slowing China and US interest rate rises. With the EU referendum on the horizon, it would be of little surprise for the UK economy to experience a degree of uncertainty. As such, the 2016 financial performance of banks such as Lloyds is likely to be impressive, but may not benefit from an advantageous macroeconomic outlook to the same extent as in recent years. That said, Lloyds is still expected to deliver a pre-tax profit of just under £8bn in the current financial year. For a business that until 2013 was deep in the red, that’s an excellent result and shows that its strategy is paying off. On this front, Lloyds’ asset disposals and a ruthless focus on efficiency have led to a relatively low cost-to-income ratio of 48%. And with a lean cost base and scope for improved profitability, there’s the potential for this figure to remain at a highly appealing level over the medium-to-long term. Dividends on the rise Due to Lloyds’ improving financial performance, its dividends are expected to rise rapidly. The bank’s shares are due to yield 5.2% in the current year as dividends per share are set to increase from 2.4p last year to 3.7p this time. That’s a gain of 54% in just a year. With the FTSE 100 yielding around 4%, Lloyds is now a very appealing income stock with a sound financial footing through which to increase shareholder payouts at a higher rate than inflation. With Lloyds trading on a P/E ratio of only 8.5, there’s significant upward rerating potential. Clearly, a rating of 17 may seem somewhat unachievable this year, but Lloyds posted a share price gain of 89% in 2012 and 61% in 2013. Both of these figures show that the bank’s shares can quickly gain in popularity and push its valuation substantially higher. And with Lloyds now in a much healthier position than in 2012 or 2013, it could be argued that even greater gains are warranted after the disappointment of 2014 and 2015. One potential catalyst to move Lloyds’ shares higher is the sale of the government’s stake that’s due to complete this year. As well as being a good deal for investors (who, when purchasing new shares, will receive a 5% discount to Lloyds’ share price plus a free share for every 10 held for a year), the end of government ownership could finally signal that Lloyds is almost back at full health, thereby boosting market sentiment. Moreover, when a yield of 5.2%, a discount of 5% and the potential for a 10% bonus (with one free share) are added to the upward rerating potential on offer, a 100% total return in the next year can’t be ruled out.
13/4/2015
11:09
uncle arthur: here is broadwoods story .. Why Lloyds Banking Group PLC Is Set To Soar By 50%! Even though the FTSE 100 has made an excellent start to 2015, Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US) has still managed to disappoint. In fact, it is up just 4% since the turn of the year, while the wider index has risen by almost twice that. However, in the long run, Lloyds could easily outperform the FTSE 100 and make gains of 50%. Here’s why. Dividends Although dividends have undoubtedly become much more important to investors, with low interest rates hurting income from cash balances in recent years, they are set to become even more appealing. That’s because there is no sign that the Bank of England will raise interest rates over the next couple of years, with a cut seemingly more likely if deflation does become a reality. As such, the yield on cash balances could fall further and cause income-seeking investors to bid up the prices of stocks that pay generous dividends. While Lloyds only recommenced dividends after cancelling them during the financial crisis, its dividend growth prospects are quite astounding. For example, in the current year Lloyds is expected to pay dividends per share of 2.7p, which equates to a yield of 3.4% at Lloyds’ current share price. However, next year, this is set to rise by a whopping 52% to 4.1p per share, as Lloyds continues to improve its profitability and becomes a more financially sound bank. And, in order to maintain Lloyds’ current yield of 3.4% next year, its share price would have to rise to just over 120p, which is almost 53% higher than its current share price. Looking Ahead Of course, a gain of that magnitude may seem difficult to contemplate – especially since in the upcoming months Lloyds could become a political ‘hot potato’, which may hurt investor sentiment in the bank. However, Lloyds and its banking sector peers have risen by amounts similar to that in the past; notably in 2013 when Lloyds added 61% to its share price, as sentiment surrounding its future improved. Clearly, there will need to be a catalyst to cause investor sentiment to positively change, but a combination of low interest rates, the potential for an upturn in the Eurozone and a UK economy that continues to go from strength to strength could be enough to boost investor sentiment in Lloyds and keep its dividend yield at or around 3.4%. Were that to happen, a gain of 50% is very much on the cards over the medium term. Of course, Lloyds isn't the only top notch income play in the FTSE 100. That's why the analysts at The Motley Fool have written a free and without obligation guide called How To Create Dividends For Life.
30/9/2015
11:02
shaws67: After nearly seven years, Lloyds' (LSE: LLOY) management can finally claim that the bank's recovery is drawing to a close. And as Lloyds finishes settling its legacy issues, profits are recovering, the bank's capital cushion is increasing, and return on equity - a measure of bank profitability - has hit a sector high. Lloyds reported an underlying first-half ROE of 16.2% and management is targeting at long-term ROE of 13.5% to 15%. Many of Lloyds' larger peers have long-term ROE targets in the low teens. What's more, Lloyds' capital cushion is above the level required by management and regulators. Specifically, Lloyds estimates that the minimum level of capital required for the business is around 12% (tier one equity ratio). At the end of the first-half the bank's tier,one equity ratio was 13.3%.Management has stated that Lloyds will return any excess capital to shareholders, and these cash returns should drive returns for investors. Dividend giant Current City figures suggest that Lloyds is a dividend giant in waiting. Management has stated that the bank plans to return "surplus capital" to investors during the next few years, and the group is targeting an ordinary dividend payout ratio of at least 50% of sustainable earnings. As a result, City analysts believe that Lloyds could return £20bn to £25bn to shareholders over the next three years. Based on these figures, analysts have pencilled in a dividend payout of around 5.6p per share for 2017. Assuming that the market bids up the price of Lloyds' shares to a dividend yield of 4.5%, the bank's share price could hit 125p by 2017, excluding dividends. When you include the dividends Lloyds is expected to pay between now and 2017, the potential total return is close to 140p per share. For example, based on current City figures Lloyds is set to pay a dividend to shareholders of 2.5p per share during 2015 and 3.9p per share during 2016. A final dividend of 5.6p per share takes the total income received during the three-year period to 12p per share. Assuming Lloyds' shares hit 125p by the end of 2017, the total return including dividends will be in the region of 137p, 84% above current levels - an annual return of more than 30%. Reinvesting dividends will only boost returns further. Waiting to buy Even though the figures suggest that Lloyds is set to return 85% during the next three years, I'm not buying just yet. I'm planning to wait for the government's retail share offering before taking a position as the offering is expected to be conducted at very favourable terms for private investors. Although the exact terms of the offering are yet to be announced, City analysts are currently expecting the shares to be sold at a 5% discount to the prevailing market price.Also, there's some speculation that a teaser offer in the form of a 10% bonus, up to the value of £200, will be made to investors who hold their allotted shares for a year.
04/8/2015
11:46
ibug: It’s finally begun: on Monday night, the government sold 5.4% of Royal Bank of Scotland Group (LSE: RBS). The deal was done in an after-hours placing to institutional investors at 330p per share, netting around £2.1bn. The sale reduced the government’s stake in RBS to just 73% and means that RBS has now joined Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) in a gradual return to the private sector. One big difference Chancellor Osborne started selling Lloyds shares when that bank’s share price reached the government’s break-even level. Mr Osborne has decided to start selling RBS shares at a significant loss, given that last night’s 330p placing price is 34% below the government’s 502p breakeven price. However, it’s worth remembering that RBS has shrunk considerably since its 2008 bailout. Net asset value has fallen from 724p per share in 2009 to just 495p in 2014. A sale at a loss was always the most likely scenario. Indeed, for investors, the re-privatization of RBS could be a buying signal. Lloyds’ gradual return to private ownership has fuelled a steady rise in the bank’s share price. Based on advice from his advisors at Rothschild’s, the Chancellor is hoping that the same will happen at RBS. Selling the government’s remaining 73% stake in RBS is likely to take several years. During this time, we should see chief executive Ross McEwan’s turnaround plan take effect, boosting earnings and giving investors more confidence in the quality of the bank’s remaining assets. RBS vs Lloyds A return to a share price of more than 400p over the next year or two seems likely in my view, although it’s not a sure thing. RBS continues to look more expensive than Lloyds, and the timeline for dividends remains uncertain: 2015 forecast P/E 2015 forecast yield 2016 forecast P/E 2016 forecast yield RBS 11.7 0.1% 13.6 1.9% Lloyds 10.2 3.1% 10.3 4.9% On these numbers, it’s hard to see any obvious reason to invest in RBS rather than Lloyds. Yet the willingness of institutional investors to buy £2.bn worth of RBS stock last night suggests that some investors can see the appeal of RBS. One possible reason for this is that whereas Lloyds’ turnaround is now pretty much complete, RBS is just getting started. For example, Lloyds’ cost: income ratio was just 51.2% in 2014. That means that the bank spent £51.20 to generate £100 of revenue. In contrast, RBS reported an adjusted cost: income ratio of 68% last year, with an unadjusted figure of 87%! If RBS can reduce costs with as much success as Lloyds, the Scottish bank’s profitability could skyrocket, pushing earnings per share well ahead of current estimates. However, I’d expect RBS to need another three years to deliver the kind of results we are now seeing from Lloyds — and there’s no guarantee of success.
28/1/2016
11:18
broadwood: No surprise there then. copyright Getty Images The chancellor has postponed the sale of the Government's final stake in Lloyds Banking Group, saying the global turmoil in the markets and slowing growth had sparked the delay. George Osborne told me that he would not give the go-ahead until the markets had calmed, saying that "now is not the right time". He said he still supported encouraging wider share ownership in Britain. So this looks like a significant delay rather than a cancellation. The sale of the final part of the government's stake in Lloyds was a general election pledge made by David Cameron. It was expected to raise £2bn, making it one of the largest privatisations since the 1980s when BT and British Gas were sold, raising £3.9bn and £5.6bn respectively. Mr Osborne announced the details of the Lloyds sale to hundreds of thousands of small investors last October. It was thought the sale would take place in the spring. But since then Lloyds' share price has fallen and the trading environment for banks has become tougher. Low interest rates also make profits harder to come by across the sector. In October, Lloyds share price was 78p, above the 74p considered to be the "in price" the government paid to rescue the bank during the financial crisis - when it used billions of pounds of tax-payers money to shore up the financial system. That share price is now down at 64p, so the government would be selling the shares to the public at a considerable loss. Yesterday, the Royal Bank of Scotland announced billions of pounds of new provisions to pay for fines and legal actions connected to the financial crisis. Its share price has also fallen. The government owns 73% of RBS and just under 10% of Lloyds. It doesn't look like it will be selling either stake any time soon
02/3/2015
16:07
dudley nightshade: Lloyds bulls out in force It's been a long wait, but Lloyds (LLOY) is paying shareholders a dividend again. It is a major milestone for the lender and talk now shifts from "when" to "how much?" And the discussion has become increasingly optimistic. Many believe the bank is due a re-rating, too, which could drive the share price considerably higher. "The combination of recovering statutory profit, non-core rundown and DTA (deferred tax assets) utilisation is likely to drive Lloyds to be one of the most capital generative banks in Europe in coming years," says UBS. "For a bank that starts this phase already above its target capital ratio (12.8% vs the newly announced 12%) - the excess capital potential is material." By next year, the broker thinks Lloyds will have delivered a cumulative 7% dividend yield, and have 16% of current market capitalisation in excess capital. "Lloyds is already above its revised CET1 target, and remains highly capital generative (150-200bps capital generation pre-dividend now expected annually). We continue to see value in Lloyds' cash generative business model, and reiterate our Buy rating with a GGM based PT of 100p." On Friday, Lloyds said it made an underlying profit of £7.76 billion in 2014, up 26% as impairments fell by 60% and costs came by 2% to £9.4 billion. Including an extra £800 million of payment protection insurance (PPI) provisions in 2013 and last year's £710 million pension credit, statutory pre-tax profit surged fourfold to £1.76 billion. Meanwhile, the post-dividend Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio - a key measure of a bank's financial strength - increased to 12.8%, evidence that Lloyds has seriously de-risked the business. Lloyds trades on 1.5 times estimates for 2015 tangible net asset value (TNAV) for 13.3% return on tangible equity (RoTE) in 2016. However, UBS believes that if Lloyds manages a RoTE of 17% by 2015 on a lower than we presently assume cost of equity of 9%, "we think this would support a share price of c.130p". Nomura Elsewhere, Nomura reckons that if Lloyds can reduce the difference between underlying and reported earnings, regulators will be far more likely to allow payout ratios to rise. "PPI, TSB sale, and restructuring costs still remain a drag through 2015, but as we get into 2016-17, we think this rerating potential will likely come through," says the broker. "As Lloyds dividend yield improves from 2.9% in 2015 to 7% in 2016, on our estimates, with upside potential driven by a 16E 14.8% CET1 ratio, we expect Lloyds to rerate from a 16E P/E of 9.2x closer to north of 12x (where the Swedish banks trade)." It has a 'buy' rating and 90p target price on the shares, but thinks that increased political rhetoric around banking ahead of the May elections, plus with the drip share sale programme, will likely "put a cap on Lloyds' near-term performance". Deutsche Bank "An inaugural dividend of 0.75p, while welcome, is nothing compared with the 14p in dividend per share we forecast for 2015-2017 and 12p of capital we expect Lloyds to have earned above its 12% CT1 target at end 2017," says Deutsche Bank. "A special dividend will be inevitable in our view. Our earnings estimates and 94p target price are unchanged. Trading at 9.7x 2016 EPS and yielding 4% this year we think the stock far too cheap and retain our Buy recommendation." This article is for information and discussion purposes only and does not form a recommendation to invest or otherwise. The value of an investment may fall. The investments referred to in this article may not be suitable for all investors, and if in doubt, an investor should seek advice from a qualified investment adviser. Share this
03/3/2015
07:46
mike740: Lloyds bulls out in force By Lee Wild | Mon, 2nd March 2015 - 14:10 It's been a long wait, but Lloyds (LLOY) is paying shareholders a dividend again. It is a major milestone for the lender and talk now shifts from "when" to "how much?" And the discussion has become increasingly optimistic. Many believe the bank is due a re-rating, too, which could drive the share price considerably higher. "The combination of recovering statutory profit, non-core rundown and DTA (deferred tax assets) utilisation is likely to drive Lloyds to be one of the most capital generative banks in Europe in coming years," says UBS. "For a bank that starts this phase already above its target capital ratio (12.8% vs the newly announced 12%) - the excess capital potential is material." By next year, the broker thinks Lloyds will have delivered a cumulative 7% dividend yield, and have 16% of current market capitalisation in excess capital. "Lloyds is already above its revised CET1 target, and remains highly capital generative (150-200bps capital generation pre-dividend now expected annually). We continue to see value in Lloyds' cash generative business model, and reiterate our Buy rating with a GGM based PT of 100p." On Friday, Lloyds said it made an underlying profit of £7.76 billion in 2014, up 26% as impairments fell by 60% and costs came by 2% to £9.4 billion. Including an extra £800 million of payment protection insurance (PPI) provisions in 2013 and last year's £710 million pension credit, statutory pre-tax profit surged fourfold to £1.76 billion. Meanwhile, the post-dividend Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio - a key measure of a bank's financial strength - increased to 12.8%, evidence that Lloyds has seriously de-risked the business. Lloyds trades on 1.5 times estimates for 2015 tangible net asset value (TNAV) for 13.3% return on tangible equity (RoTE) in 2016. However, UBS believes that if Lloyds manages a RoTE of 17% by 2015 on a lower than we presently assume cost of equity of 9%, "we think this would support a share price of c.130p". [...] Nomura Elsewhere, Nomura reckons that if Lloyds can reduce the difference between underlying and reported earnings, regulators will be far more likely to allow payout ratios to rise. "PPI, TSB sale, and restructuring costs still remain a drag through 2015, but as we get into 2016-17, we think this rerating potential will likely come through," says the broker. "As Lloyds dividend yield improves from 2.9% in 2015 to 7% in 2016, on our estimates, with upside potential driven by a 16E 14.8% CET1 ratio, we expect Lloyds to rerate from a 16E P/E of 9.2x closer to north of 12x (where the Swedish banks trade)." It has a 'buy' rating and 90p target price on the shares, but thinks that increased political rhetoric around banking ahead of the May elections, plus with the drip share sale programme, will likely "put a cap on Lloyds' near-term performance". Deutsche Bank "An inaugural dividend of 0.75p, while welcome, is nothing compared with the 14p in dividend per share we forecast for 2015-2017 and 12p of capital we expect Lloyds to have earned above its 12% CT1 target at end 2017," says Deutsche Bank. "A special dividend will be inevitable in our view. Our earnings estimates and 94p target price are unchanged. Trading at 9.7x 2016 EPS and yielding 4% this year we think the stock far too cheap and retain our Buy recommendation."
24/7/2015
10:47
ibug: For what it's worth today---perhaps a bit of hope: Bank watchers have some important dates coming up, with three of our high-street banks set to report interim results in the coming days. Barclays (LSE: BARC) is up first, reporting on its first six months on Wednesday 29th, with Royal Bank of Scotland (LSE: RBS) a day later and Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) finishing off the week with its figures out on Friday. In its first quarter results released in April, Barclays provided evidence of an ever-strengthening recovery, claiming a rise of 9% in adjusted pre-tax profit, to £1,848m. Net tangible asset value per share stood at 288p, which looks pretty healthy to me at today’s share price of 283p. Looking to full-year forecasts, the pundits are suggesting a rise of a third in earnings per share (EPS), which would give us a P/E of 12. The Q1 dividend was held at 1p per share, but with a full-year payment of 8p expected (which would yield 2.9%), dividend news on Wednesday would be welcome. Strong recovery Over at Lloyds the recovery from the depths of recession has been healthy, and though EPS is expected to be pretty much flat this year and next now that TSB has been spun off, Lloyds reported a first-quarter rise in underlying profit of 21% to £2,178m. But what are Lloyds shares worth now? Well, the price has more than trebled in a little more than three years, to the 86p level. But even after that, we’re looking at a forward P/E of only around 10.5. To put that into perspective, the long-term FTSE 100 average stands at around 14, and for Lloyds to get back to that kind of valuation would suggest a share price closer to 115p. Should Lloyds shares command such an average valuation? Well, there are surely fears of further banking misdemeanors yet to be uncovered, and the eurozone is pressing heavily on the banking sector right now. But with Lloyds back to paying dividends, there are yields of 3.1% this year and 4.7% next on the cards, and that’s seriously better than the FTSE average of a little over 3%. Long term, I think Lloyds deserves a higher rating. The shredded one? That brings me to the enigmatic RBS, whose shares have gained 70% over a similar 3-year period, but they already command a higher P/E multiple than either Barclays or Lloyds. Forecasts suggest a ratio of 13 this year, with the bank expected to record its first significant EPS in years (last year’s 0.8p was just the turning of the corner). But at this stage, the City is expecting 2016 earnings to drop back, pushing the P/E up to 14.5. And this is a bank that is a long way from paying steady dividends at any decent level — we’re hoping there’ll be a payment this year, but it would yield less than 0.5%. These three banks are very much a mixed bag. I see Barclays and Lloyds as being serious Buy candidates, but I really don’t see any attraction in RBS. We’re heading into a bank reporting season that’s not to be missed. Some good bank shares could set you on the road to an investment approach that has brought great long-term rewards for a century and more. hTTp://www.fool.co.uk/investing/2015/07/24/are-barclays-plc-lloyds-banking-group-plc-royal-bank-of-scotland-group-plc-worth-buying-ahead-of-interims/

Lloyds (LLOY) Latest Trade

Lloyds Most Recent Trade

Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Trade Date Trade Time Currency
92,296 58.48 12 Feb 2016 17:14:32 GBX
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