Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.33p +0.51% 65.07p 65.09p 65.11p 65.53p 64.57p 65.16p 183,779,343.00 16:35:19
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 23,150.0 1,644.0 0.8 81.3 46,442.89

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DateSubject
22/1/2017
08:20
Lloyds Daily Update: Lloyds Banking Group is listed in the Banks sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker LLOY. The last closing price for Lloyds was 64.74p.
Lloyds Banking Group has a 4 week average price of 64.87p and a 12 week average price of 61.25p.
The 1 year high share price is 74p while the 1 year low share price is currently 47.10p.
There are currently 71,373,735,357 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 164,260,705 shares. The market capitalisation of Lloyds Banking Group is £46,442,889,596.80.
16/1/2017
15:12
jacko07: The Buffett may still be considering Lloyds especially as the following piece is pre the 20% drop in the pound and the share price stood at 66p the same as Friday. That government stake could be nearing 5%. Could there be an american suitor, is this government stake earmarked. Well, it is Morgan Stanley selling it and they are close to old Warren. Indeed, I reckon if he was a UK-focused investor, Lloyds, which can be considered the UK’s equivalent of Wells Fargo, might well be in his sights again. Lloyds and Wells Fargo are both traditional banks, focused on providing straightforward services to individuals and businesses, and doing the simple things well to make decent profits for their shareholders. Both have the leading share of the mortgage market in their countries and take a conservative attitude to risk. One valuation measure for Wells Fargo gives an indication of how the market might value Lloyds when the government exits all of its stake and PPI payments are consigned to history. The underlying strength of Lloyds is greater than it appears and a US player could take a stake at huge discount. Wells Fargo trades on a price-to-book (P/B) ratio of 1.53, compared with Lloyds at 0.94. If Lloyds were to attract the same rating as its US cousin, its shares would be at 107p – a very healthy uplift on today’s 66p, and I think a fair indication of where we might hope the shares will be in a year or two.
09/1/2017
09:58
broadwood: Today's gospel according to the Motley. There’s no denying that the Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) recovery from its bailout in 2008 has been nothing short of impressive. The bank, which was on the verge of bankruptcy at the time of the bailout, has since recovered to be one of the best capitalised and most efficient banks in Europe. What’s more, after the acquisition of credit card group MBNA from its former owners at the end of last year, Lloyds is now back on a growth trajectory. But despite Lloyds’ impressive turnaround and the bank’s newfound thirst for growth, the market continues to avoid its shares. Indeed, over the past two years, shares in Lloyds have fallen by 11% excluding dividends, a drop brought into even sharper focus at present given rival Barclays‘ recent share price surge. What’s holding Lloyds back?  The one main factor that seems to be holding shares in Lloyds back is trust. Even nine years on from the onset of the financial crisis investors are still finding it difficult to trust banks. And who can blame them? The entire European banking sector is currently facing numerous headwinds, which are holding back earnings and non-performing loans are eroding capital buffers. Unfortunately, there’s no sign these pressures will dissipate anytime soon. Lloyds isn’t entirely immune from these pressures, but over the past few years the bank has shown that it’s a much more stable and productive institution than the majority of its peers both at home and overseas — a fact City analysts have been extremely keen to point out. At the top of its game  A recent broker note from analysts at Barclays proclaimed Lloyds can generate a consistent, sustainable 13% return on tangible equity (a measure of banking profitability) every year for the next three years. By comparison, Deutsche Bank and Barclays reported a return on tangible equity of 2% and 3.6% respectively for the third quarter 2016. Even Lloyds’ American peers, which are usually considered to be in better health than European banks, are lagging the UK lending behemoth. JP Morgan, Bank of America and Morgan Stanley reported a return on equity of 10%, 7.3% and 8.7% respectively for the third quarter. On top of the sector-leading profitability ratios, analysts at Barclays also expect Lloyds to return as much as £10bn of capital to investors over the next few years to 2019. Lloyds’ management has long stated that the bank will return any excess cash to investors and the £10bn capital return will translate into an estimated 15p per share, around a quarter of the company’s current market capitalisation. The bottom line So overall, it appears that investors’ lack of trust in the banking sector in general is holding back Lloyds’ shares. However, for patient long-term investors, this lack of confidence is no reason not to invest. Lloyds is arguably one of the best banks in Europe, the shares trade at an attractive 9.2 times forward earnings, support a dividend yield of 3.4% and if City analysts are to be believed, shareholders are set for a 15p per share cash return over the next three years.
17/12/2016
15:59
freddie01: Why Lloyds Banking Group plc is set to beat the FTSE 100 in 2017 Lloyds(LSE: LLOY) has endured a difficult 2016, with the bank's share price falling by 13% year-to-date. However, it could have been much worse. Investor sentiment in the part-nationalised bank has strengthened after the initial shock of the EU referendum result. And the performance of the UK economy has held up better than forecast in the second half of the year. Despite this, Lloyds has lagged the FTSE 100 by 25% this year. But looking ahead to next year, I feel that the tables could turn. Brexit challenges The bank faces problems associated with Brexit. While the UK economy has held up well thus far, heightened uncertainty could become a key theme of the next year. This could lead to downgrades on GDP forecasts and cause profitability at UK-focused banks to come under pressure. However, Lloyds seems to be well-placed to deal with such Brexit-induced woes. For example, it has spent recent years becoming increasingly efficient and has made numerous job cuts, efficiencies and asset disposals. They've positioned the company as a relatively efficient bank among what remains a troubled sector. As such, it may be hit less hard than rivals and investor sentiment may therefore be higher than expected. The bank's valuation indicates that the market has already priced-in future difficulties. It trades on a forward price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of just 9.5, which shows that there's scope for a significantly higher rating. In fact, even a 50% rise in the bank's share price would equate to a P/E ratio of just 14.3. With the FTSE 100 being close to its all-time high, it lacks value appeal compared to Lloyds. Income potential It's not just on the valuation front that Lloyds impresses. With inflation forecast to rise to nearly 3% next year, higher yields and growing dividends could become increasingly in vogue. That's because investors may become concerned at the effect of higher inflation on their incomes, with weaker sterling likely to be a key feature of 2017. With a yield of 4.9%, Lloyds is a very strong income stock. It's due to raise dividends by almost 18% in 2017, which puts it on a forward yield of 5.8%. Despite such a large rise in dividends, the bank is still expected to cover its shareholder payouts around 1.8 times next year. This indicates that there's scope for further rises in future years without jeopardising the company's growth potential or financial standing. Index-beating outlook While 2016 has been a disappointing year for the bank, its prospects for 2017 are very bright. Brexit may cause volatility in its share price, but its improvements as a business in recent years have positioned it well to withstand the difficulties that may present themselves. The market already seems to have priced-in a difficult outlook, while the income potential on offer over the medium term could create heightened demand for the bank's shares next year. Therefore, I believe that FTSE 100-beating prospects may be just around the corner. hxxp://money.aol.co.uk/2016/12/17/why-lloyds-banking-group-plc-is-set-to-beat-the-ftse-100-in-2017/
09/12/2016
09:10
sundan: Best bank share tip for 2017 - By Lee Wild | Thu, 8th December 2016 - 09:00 Best bank share tip for 2017 UBS research European bank sector price to book London's bank shares index is hardly changed in 2016, but the past 11 months have been anything but dull. After losing over a quarter of its value during the first six weeks of the year, the sector rallied more than 40% from its post-EU referendum low. Things could get even better for some, according to UBS, which has just named its top picks for 2017. "The turnaround in sector performance reflects increased optimism about global growth, expectations of economic expansion together with prospects of higher interest rates, especially following in the US presidential election," explains UBS. "Should the banking sector finish the year in positive territory, it will be the first time since 2013, when the sector ended up 13.5%." In a hefty 95-page tome, the broker's team of analysts outline a number of positive developments for the industry, suggesting fundamentals are improving. Expect a gradual recovery in loan growth, which UBS believes has bottomed out, and a benign environment for asset quality as capital is built up. The broker's expectations for return on equity (ROE) have improved 20 basis points in recent months, yet remain well below historical levels at a forecast 10.7% in 2017. A 96-basis point jump in US 10-year bond yields since July to 2.32% is also good news for banks. Traders think president-elect Donald Trump's promised economic stimulus could underpin faster growth and herald the return of inflation, says UBS. "Analysis of US 10-year bond yields and global banks' share price performance over the past 10 years shows a reasonably positive correlation, implying that rising US Treasury yields tend to be generally positive for global banks' share price performance." Stand-out lenders Eleven lenders stand out for the broker, although from the UK only Lloyds Banking (LLOY) makes the "most preferred" list, with a 'buy' rating and 67p price target. In fact, it's one of UBS's key recommendations across the European bank sector. It's among the cheapest in terms of price/earnings (PE) multiples, too, trading on 8.1 times adjusted earnings per share, rising to 9.2 in 2017. A price-to-book ratio of 1 times and 0.9 times, respectively, is low, too, while forward dividend yield of 6.9% for next year is streets ahead of the other ten UBS top picks. Lloyds should stay capital generative, delivering a 5% yield in 2016 and 7% in 2017"As the only large-cap UK lender with the capacity to re-price deposits enough to offset the impact on loan returns of a lower BoE rate, we expect a resilient net interest margin," says UBS analyst Jason Napier. "Lloyds has also done the least to reset its branch network for the digital age over the last five years, leaving room for further cost-cutting if required. "A lower-risk loan portfolio should keep impairments manageable. In all, we expect the franchise to remain strongly capital-generative, delivering a 5% yield in 2016 and 7% in 2017." Uncertainty in spades That's reassuring, considering there's uncertainty in spades, specifically around Brexit and Article 50. Another anticipated cut in interest rates by the Bank of England will also further pressure margins. However, Napier predicts strong growth in stated profits in 2017 for the five major listed UK banks, driven by big reductions in "below-the-line" charges and non-core asset losses.
15/10/2016
13:10
excell1: tempus October 15 2016, 12:01am, The Times The Black Horse and an each-way bet Martin Waller The reaction of the Lloyds Banking Group share price after the government announced the sale of its remaining shares a week ago is an odd one. The shares fell by 4 per cent; they are still off 4 per cent after some recovery yesterday. It is not as if we didn’t know that the state still held 9.1 per cent and would be selling at some time. The shares will be dribbled out over a period of up to a year, starting date not known, so it is not like some massive rights issue hitting the market overnight. It has removed a degree of uncertainty over the sale. Whatever the rights and wrongs of not having a retail sale with a loyalty share bonus if you hold for long enough — the structure that was being considered — this has made the disposal of the shares a great deal simpler. Retail investors are quite at liberty to go into the market and buy the shares anyway, taking advantage of that fall in the price. Should they? There is no question that Lloyds, which is almost entirely UK-facing and has nearly a quarter of all retail accounts, is hugely cash-generative and that it has indicated, and past actions show, that the most likely option is that the cash will be paid back to investors. There are a few caveats, though. The first is the reason for the decline in the share price by more than a fifth since the start of the year, with a sharp drop after the EU referendum: that British exposure. Plainly, continuing low interest rates will hurt banks and cut the margins they make on lending. There will be a further unspecified drag from any UK economic slowdown. Some numbers out from the Bank of England only yesterday suggested that businesses are, indeed, pulling in their horns and borrowing less. By some estimates Lloyds will have approaching £3 billion of surplus capital by the end of the year. There are calls on this capital, though. The low bond yields available will mean further pressure on the pension fund and the need for top-ups. There is also the potential for further payment protection insurance claims. Lloyds has third-quarter figures out on October 26. One analyst says they could include an £800 million hit apiece from these in the figures. This is guesswork and the deadline for further PPI claims has been set for 2019, which gives the banks some degree of certainty. The biggest question over the dividend is the possible purchase by Lloyds, mooted for some months now, of MBNA, the huge credit card operation owned by Bank of America Merrill Lynch. This has about 11 per cent of the UK credit card market. Its owners are desperate to be shot of it. Lloyds is the only credible buyer, private equity aside, because Barclays is probably precluded owing to its ownership of Barclaycard. It makes a good fit with Lloyds, which wants to build up its credit card business. The price of the deal has been coming down. MBNA’s loan book is about £7 billion, but a buyer might be able to offer less than that. Any deal would add to earnings almost immediately but it would mean some limitation to Lloyds’ dividend growth, one of the main reasons for holding the shares. The bank paid 2.25p in dividends last year, along with a 0.5p special. Assume a decent increase and a repetition of that special and the shares yield more than 5.6 per cent, while that yield shoots up to approaching 8 per cent in 2018. An MBNA deal would lessen this, but the increase in earnings would boost the share price. On that basis, the shares look like a good two-way bet.
04/10/2016
13:05
allinhope: Watching lloy share price is somewhat tiresome given the daily ups and downs in comparison to the 100 and peer banks. I know this is how the market operates but for some reason, as a lloy shareholder I can help feeling as there is something odd about lloy share movements. Thoughts anyone.
02/8/2016
12:44
raffles the gentleman thug: Osborne was clearly too distracted by the lovely Thea Rogers OBE to even consider the lofty LLOY share price
28/7/2016
07:39
blusteradjuster: LLOY share price slips below its TNAV. In fairness, it's just joining all the others in that. Market is pricing in value destruction all across the sector.
19/7/2016
11:10
robwt: monty.... I think you are maybe hoping that they will sell at that price, which will be a thumping great loss to the taxpayer. If the govt sold the stock to fund managers at 50p a share, they would unleash the wrath of the press and the public who would accuse them of selling it to their cronies at a knockdown price. Cable took a lot of stick on Royal Mail and look where he is now. May and Hammond will not risk the backlash Osbourne could have sold these shares two years ago and made a profit, just shows how well he knows the markets. Had he sold them, they probably would not be down at this bombed out price. The goverment stake creates a black hole, a false market on the share price Lloyds are doing well, but the share price lanquishes in the 50s because funds are waiting. Average Fund managers are like lemmings, they have no bottle when times are uncertain. I am not saying the Govt won't sell it off at a loss, but they will sell it to with the public having first dibs. That will be when the share price recovers from these lows. IMO Hammond will announce the sell off as soon as the share price is above 63p, which according to experts is the real stand in price after taking dividends and other sales in to account
27/6/2016
10:14
gyy: hxxp://www.capitalcube.com/blog/index.php/lloyds-banking-group-plc-breached-its-50-day-moving-average-in-a-bearish-manner-lloy-gb-june-27-2016/ Share Price Performance Relative to Peers Compared to peers, relative underperformance last month is down from a median performance last year. While LLOY-GB‘s change in share price of -34.58% for the last 12 months is in line with its peer median, its more recent 30-day share price performance of -21.29% is below peer median. This suggests that the company’s performance has deteriorated more recently relative to peers. Share Price Performance Lloyds Banking Group Plc has an earnings score of 25.74 and has a relative valuation of UNDERVALUED. Stocks with High Earnings Momentum are a preferred option for momentum plays. If they are undervalued, it can be a further advantage and may indicate sustained momentum.
Lloyds share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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