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Lloyds Share Price - LLOY

Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change Price Change % Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00 +0.00% 75.86 76.04 76.07 - - - 0 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m) RN NRN
Banks 29,892.0 1,762.0 1.7 44.6 54,144.12

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DateSubject
06/1/2015
10:00
gotnorolex: Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) shares appear to be at risk of sliding lower with current momentum indicators confirming the downside is preferred. The decline must be seen in the context of the longer-term sideways trend, defined by an upside limit at 77p and the downside support line at around 70p. The LLOY share price has been caught in this region since early 2014 which confirms to us just how entrenched these levels have become. December did see a break above 77p and many in the market would have seen this as a sign that a positive breakout had occured. However, the stalling in buying interest saw the Lloyds share price fall back into range. As such we would not be surprised to see the bottom end of the range at 70p come into play. Lloyds Bank stock is currently priced below its 20 and 50 day Moving Averages located at at 77.42 and 77.26. The RSI is below 50 and the MACD is negative and below its signal line which confirms to us that buying interest remains soft. hTTp://www.thecsuite.co.uk/CFO/index.php/finance/207-lloyds-and-barclays-shares-barc-lloy-454354
18/8/2014
13:53
cm44: Lloyds Banking Group PLC Could Be Worth 106p! By Peter Stephens - Monday, 18 August, 2014 Investors in Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US) shouldn't lose hope in the prospects for the part-nationalised bank. In fact, Lloyds could have huge potential despite posting disappointing share price returns during the course of 2014, with the bank's share price currently being down 6% year to date. This is behind the FTSE 100's 1% decline, but the rest of 2014 and beyond could prove to be far more enjoyable for investors in Lloyds. In fact, its share price could make gains of 44%. Here's why. Vast Yield Potential A key reason why Lloyds could see its share price move higher over the next couple of years is dividend growth. Indeed, a combination of a higher payout ratio and growing profitability could prove to be a highly potent combination that pushes Lloyds' shares higher. For instance, Lloyds is aiming to pay out around 65% of profit as a dividend in 2016, with the ratio increasing from this year's forecast of 17% over the next couple of years until it reaches its desired level. In addition, Lloyds' bottom line is expected to grow by 7% in 2015 alone. The impact of these two factors could be significant. That's because Lloyds currently has a yield of 4.3%, which is impressive and ahead of the FTSE 100′s yield of 3.6%. However, that assumes a dividend payout ratio of just 39% in 2015. Even if we are conservative and assume zero growth in Lloyds' profitability between 2015 and 2016, a payout ratio that increases to 65% in 2016 (which is the bank's target) would mean that Lloyds trades on a forward yield of 7.2% at current prices. Certainly, 2016 is another 16 months away, but if Lloyds looks set to meet (or get close to) its payout ratio target in 2016, shares could move a lot higher in the meantime as investors bid up their price to take advantage of a highly lucrative forward yield of 7.2% (at current prices). Looking Ahead Even if Lloyds were to trade at a forward yield of 5% based on 2016′s dividends per share, which is itself a highly attractive yield, it would equate to share price gains of 44% from the current price of 74p. In other words, investors could bid up the price of Lloyds' shares so as to reduce the forward yield (using 2016′s dividend per share forecasts) of 7.2% to 5% over the next couple of years. The question is; can Lloyds actually afford to pay out 65% of profit as a dividend? The answer to that is very much a 'yes', since the banking sector continues to benefit from an improving UK economy where PPI provisions are likely to become smaller going forward and where write-downs and bad loans are likely to continue their downward trajectory over the medium term. Although 2014 has been disappointing for shareholders in Lloyds, a 44% increase in its share price over the next couple of years is very achievable. After all, this is the bank that gained 61% in 2013 alone.
26/11/2014
15:01
newbank: The Motley fool constantly publish conflicting reports. Only a few days ago the following was published: Rewind the clocks a year and the mood among investors in Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US) was very different than it is today. Indeed, shares in the part-nationalised bank had risen by 54% since the turn of the year at that point and investors in the bank were highly optimistic that the next year would mean more growth for their bottom line. However, Lloyds has disappointed over the last year, with its share price being up just 3% since 21 November 2013. Worse still is the performance of shares in Barclays (LSE: BARC) (NYSE: BCS.US) since that date, with them being down 6% over the last year. Looking ahead, though, could Lloyds rekindle its 2013 performance next year and make gains of more than 50%? If so, can Barclays mirror its sector peer and turn around 2014's dismal share price performance? Margin Of Safety Lloyds and Barclays both have wide margins of safety included in their current share prices. In other words, the market is anticipating further negative news flow for both stocks and is expecting further challenges for them both as we emerge from the global financial crisis. For example, Barclays has a price to book (P/B) ratio of just 0.7, while Lloyds' P/B ratio is also relatively low at 1.4. Furthermore, the two banks have price to earnings (P/E) ratios that are also depressed, with Barclays having a P/E ratio of 11.4 and Lloyds having a P/E ratio of 10.1. Clearly, there is scope for an upward adjustment to both ratios for both banks, especially while the FTSE 100 has a P/E ratio of 15.4, for instance. That's 35% higher than Barclays' rating and 52% higher than Lloyds' P/E ratio, which indicates that there is considerable share price growth potential in both stocks moving forward. And, in the case of Lloyds, it's enough to reach our target of a 50% rise in its share price in 2015. Indeed, it would only take a P/E ratio equal to the wider index to achieve this level of return. Growth Potential With both banks being focused on the UK, their bottom lines are expected to improve rapidly in the current year as the UK economy picks up pace and cements its position as the fastest growing developed economy in the world. In the case of Lloyds this means that the bank is forecast to return to profitability for the first time since the credit crunch, with earnings set to grow by a further 6% next year. In the case of Barclays (which has been profitable throughout the credit crunch), it means that earnings are set to grow by 23% in the current year, and by a further 28% next year. This means that Lloyds could be trading 61% higher in a year's time (broken down as a 52% gain from an upward rerating so that it equals the FTSE 100's P/E ratio, multiplied by 6% from earnings growth). Meanwhile, Barclays could see its share price trading 73% higher from a combination of a higher rating (+35%) and strong bottom line growth (+28%) multiplied together. Looking Ahead Certainly, there are difficulties on the horizon. For example, PPI claims are not yet closed, while fines for alleged wrongdoings cannot be ruled out for the banking sector. In addition, a weak Eurozone could hold back UK economic performance in 2015, with investor sentiment also having the potential to weaken due to Russian sanctions, unrest in the Middle East, and the threat of an Ebola outbreak. However, Barclays and Lloyds can make gains of at least 50% in 2015. Lloyds achieved that feat in 2013 and, with both banks trading on very low valuations and having extremely positive earnings forecasts for the next couple of years, it is a realistic target for both banks to make share price gains of 50% in 2015. Of course, they're not the only banks that could post exceptional gains next year. In fact, I think that all investors could benefit from an attractively priced banking sector that has significant future potential.
25/11/2014
19:57
rat attack: gotnorolex.....ps...Link won't transfer but you can get to 3i easily for the whole article. Will it not? I am certainly not a genius, but this is the copied link...... Rewind the clocks a year and the mood among investors in Lloyds (LSE:LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US) was very different than it is today. Indeed, shares in the part-nationalised bank had risen by 54% since the turn of the year at that point and investors in the bank were highly optimistic that the next year would mean more growth for their bottom line. However, Lloyds has disappointed over the last year, with its share price being up just 3% since 21 November 2013. Worse still is the performance of shares in Barclays (LSE:BARC) (NYSE: BCS.US) since that date, with them being down 6% over the last year. Looking ahead, though, could Lloyds rekindle its 2013 performance next year and make gains of more than 50%? If so, can Barclays mirror its sector peer and turn around 2014's dismal share price performance? Margin Of Safety Lloyds and Barclays both have wide margins of safety included in their current share prices. In other words, the market is anticipating further negative news flow for both stocks and is expecting further challenges for them both as we emerge from the global financial crisis. For example, Barclays has a price to book (P/B) ratio of just 0.7, while Lloyds' P/B ratio is also relatively low at 1.4. Furthermore, the two banks have price to earnings (P/E) ratios that are also depressed, with Barclays having a P/E ratio of 11.4 and Lloyds having a P/E ratio of 10.1. Clearly, there is scope for an upward adjustment to both ratios for both banks, especially while the FTSE 100 has a P/E ratio of 15.4, for instance. That's 35% higher than Barclays' rating and 52% higher than Lloyds' P/E ratio, which indicates that there is considerable share price growth potential in both stocks moving forward. And, in the case of Lloyds, it's enough to reach our target of a 50% rise in its share price in 2015. Indeed, it would only take a P/E ratio equal to the wider index to achieve this level of return. Growth Potential With both banks being focused on the UK, their bottom lines are expected to improve rapidly in the current year as the UK economy picks up pace and cements its position as the fastest growing developed economy in the world. In the case of Lloyds this means that the bank is forecast to return to profitability for the first time since the credit crunch, with earnings set to grow by a further 6% next year. In the case of Barclays (which has been profitable throughout the credit crunch), it means that earnings are set to grow by 23% in the current year, and by a further 28% next year. This means that Lloyds could be trading 61% higher in a year's time (broken down as a 52% gain from an upward rerating so that it equals the FTSE 100's P/E ratio, multiplied by 6% from earnings growth). Meanwhile, Barclays could see its share price trading 73% higher from a combination of a higher rating (+35%) and strong bottom line growth (+28%) multiplied together. Looking Ahead Certainly, there are difficulties on the horizon. For example, PPI claims are not yet closed, while fines for alleged wrongdoings cannot be ruled out for the banking sector. In addition, a weak Eurozone could hold back UK economic performance in 2015, with investor sentiment also having the potential to weaken due to Russian sanctions, unrest in the Middle East, and the threat of an Ebola outbreak. However, Barclays and Lloyds can make gains of at least 50% in 2015. Lloyds achieved that feat in 2013 and, with both banks trading on very low valuations and having extremely positive earnings forecasts for the next couple of years, it is a realistic target for both banks to make share price gains of 50% in 2015. Of course, they're not the only banks that could post exceptional gains next year. In fact, I think that all investors could benefit from an attractively priced banking sector that has significant future potential.
05/8/2015
14:36
m4rtinu: So not only is Osborne losing vast amounts on the sale of RBS shares, he has now contributed to the fall in LLOY share price and is losing, perhaps as much as 5p share on any further LLOY sale. Purely idiologically driven decision on RBS in my view.
19/8/2014
13:23
jb890: my humble analysis of our beloved black horse :) ... Regarding the Uk govmt offer of lloyds shares to retail shareholders [ie. joe public]-- much is being said about this supposed 'great' retail offer that should happen some time in the future!! According to sections of the Uk media, Joe public is eagerly waiting for this offer to materialise so that they would pounce on lloyds shares!! NONSENSE!! Simple logic would dictate otherwise - who in his right senses would wait for the govmt to offer lloyds shares to the public, when these shares are already readily available on the market!! Besides that, the govmt won't sell at anywhere below the current market price since it would amount to a paper loss - something which neither this govmt nor the next will ever be doing! As everyone knows, in practice the market would not readily adjust the share price to the new reduced total shares in circulation [though the mechanics of a perfect market should do so in theory] - however, it is most beneficial to lloyds shareholders [especially those who are 'long'], since: 1. a reduction in the total number of shares means a higher dividend yield per share [ie. when a dividend is eventually declared, each share would then receive a higher divi]; 2. a higher div yield makes a share more attractive for quite a few obvious reasons, thus, helping boost a share price increase through enhanced valuation, demand etc..; 3. by refraining to pay any 'cash' dividend till when the govmt disposes of the lloyds holding, lloyds would not be regaling any more money to the govmt [by way of dividend]. Re. Lloyds dividend - again...a lot is being said about a 2014 dividend to the tune of 1.5p. This would amount to around Stg1.1 billion - would it be better to allocate this amount as part of a repurchase agreement of govmt held shares! This would really add value to lloyds shares [apart from saving us the handing of more cash 'as dividends' to the govmt!] As per Lloyds interim figures we made an underlying profit of Stg3.8b [ie. what final profits would lloyds make in theory if it is not faced with no other additional rubbish...eg. PPI, fines, impairments, restructuring one-offs, asset disposals & other one-offs that keep on sprouting with every set of accounts published for these last 3 years or more!!] Therefore, we are theoretically looking at a bank able to generate around Stg7.6b per annum [not taking into account further enhancements to this figure in line with our own CEO's declaration]. let's for a moment think ahead [3-5 yrs timeframe] when hopefully bottom line kicking surprises would not materially exist any longer....this would imply an EPS of around 11p ... as per our CEO divi payout plans of between 50-70% we would then be looking at a divi of 7.7p per share (@70% payout) ...a yield at today's price [of around 75p] of 10.3% and a forward P/E ratio [price earnings ratio] of just 7.6 times [in better times this would have normally stood at around 14 times or more for the banking sector!] ...Matters would not be so smooth in practice but this would really make today's prices a screaming bargain [on a long basis]. On a p/e ratio of 14 times lloyds share price would be around stg1.38 [which would account to a market capitalisation of around stg98b and a PBV ratio of around 2.84 times. PBV ratio - another point to ponder is re the PBV ratio [price to book value or market price divided by the net tangible assets] - pre-crisis this would have normally been acceptable at a figure of between 3-4 for banks...lloyds PBV now stand at 1.5 [@ a PBV of 4 times lloyds share price would be around stg1.95! Should confidence in the banking sector returns in future years...this would imply a not so small share price boost considering the valuation criteria of the not so distant past! Hope you find this info interesting :)
13/4/2015
12:09
uncle arthur: here is broadwoods story .. Why Lloyds Banking Group PLC Is Set To Soar By 50%! Even though the FTSE 100 has made an excellent start to 2015, Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US) has still managed to disappoint. In fact, it is up just 4% since the turn of the year, while the wider index has risen by almost twice that. However, in the long run, Lloyds could easily outperform the FTSE 100 and make gains of 50%. Here’s why. Dividends Although dividends have undoubtedly become much more important to investors, with low interest rates hurting income from cash balances in recent years, they are set to become even more appealing. That’s because there is no sign that the Bank of England will raise interest rates over the next couple of years, with a cut seemingly more likely if deflation does become a reality. As such, the yield on cash balances could fall further and cause income-seeking investors to bid up the prices of stocks that pay generous dividends. While Lloyds only recommenced dividends after cancelling them during the financial crisis, its dividend growth prospects are quite astounding. For example, in the current year Lloyds is expected to pay dividends per share of 2.7p, which equates to a yield of 3.4% at Lloyds’ current share price. However, next year, this is set to rise by a whopping 52% to 4.1p per share, as Lloyds continues to improve its profitability and becomes a more financially sound bank. And, in order to maintain Lloyds’ current yield of 3.4% next year, its share price would have to rise to just over 120p, which is almost 53% higher than its current share price. Looking Ahead Of course, a gain of that magnitude may seem difficult to contemplate – especially since in the upcoming months Lloyds could become a political ‘hot potato’, which may hurt investor sentiment in the bank. However, Lloyds and its banking sector peers have risen by amounts similar to that in the past; notably in 2013 when Lloyds added 61% to its share price, as sentiment surrounding its future improved. Clearly, there will need to be a catalyst to cause investor sentiment to positively change, but a combination of low interest rates, the potential for an upturn in the Eurozone and a UK economy that continues to go from strength to strength could be enough to boost investor sentiment in Lloyds and keep its dividend yield at or around 3.4%. Were that to happen, a gain of 50% is very much on the cards over the medium term. Of course, Lloyds isn't the only top notch income play in the FTSE 100. That's why the analysts at The Motley Fool have written a free and without obligation guide called How To Create Dividends For Life.
04/8/2015
12:46
ibug: It’s finally begun: on Monday night, the government sold 5.4% of Royal Bank of Scotland Group (LSE: RBS). The deal was done in an after-hours placing to institutional investors at 330p per share, netting around £2.1bn. The sale reduced the government’s stake in RBS to just 73% and means that RBS has now joined Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) in a gradual return to the private sector. One big difference Chancellor Osborne started selling Lloyds shares when that bank’s share price reached the government’s break-even level. Mr Osborne has decided to start selling RBS shares at a significant loss, given that last night’s 330p placing price is 34% below the government’s 502p breakeven price. However, it’s worth remembering that RBS has shrunk considerably since its 2008 bailout. Net asset value has fallen from 724p per share in 2009 to just 495p in 2014. A sale at a loss was always the most likely scenario. Indeed, for investors, the re-privatization of RBS could be a buying signal. Lloyds’ gradual return to private ownership has fuelled a steady rise in the bank’s share price. Based on advice from his advisors at Rothschild’s, the Chancellor is hoping that the same will happen at RBS. Selling the government’s remaining 73% stake in RBS is likely to take several years. During this time, we should see chief executive Ross McEwan’s turnaround plan take effect, boosting earnings and giving investors more confidence in the quality of the bank’s remaining assets. RBS vs Lloyds A return to a share price of more than 400p over the next year or two seems likely in my view, although it’s not a sure thing. RBS continues to look more expensive than Lloyds, and the timeline for dividends remains uncertain: 2015 forecast P/E 2015 forecast yield 2016 forecast P/E 2016 forecast yield RBS 11.7 0.1% 13.6 1.9% Lloyds 10.2 3.1% 10.3 4.9% On these numbers, it’s hard to see any obvious reason to invest in RBS rather than Lloyds. Yet the willingness of institutional investors to buy £2.bn worth of RBS stock last night suggests that some investors can see the appeal of RBS. One possible reason for this is that whereas Lloyds’ turnaround is now pretty much complete, RBS is just getting started. For example, Lloyds’ cost: income ratio was just 51.2% in 2014. That means that the bank spent £51.20 to generate £100 of revenue. In contrast, RBS reported an adjusted cost: income ratio of 68% last year, with an unadjusted figure of 87%! If RBS can reduce costs with as much success as Lloyds, the Scottish bank’s profitability could skyrocket, pushing earnings per share well ahead of current estimates. However, I’d expect RBS to need another three years to deliver the kind of results we are now seeing from Lloyds — and there’s no guarantee of success.
04/11/2014
08:13
broadwood: 2014 | See also: LLOYLYG 0 in Share . Lloyds 2014 has been a real let-down for investors in Lloyds (LSE: LLOY) (NYSE: LYG.US). That’s because, after rising by a whopping 61% in 2013, shares in the part-nationalised bank have fallen by 2% this year and are showing little sign of life. Indeed, much better performance was expected, since this is the year that Lloyds is all-set to return to profitability, after posting a run of loss-making years throughout the credit crunch. However, the possibility of profitability and a dividend has done little to ignite investor interest. Can we really expect the situation to be much different in 2015, and for Lloyds to beat the FTSE 100 next year? The General Election With the General Election taking place in May next year, Lloyds could find itself at the centre of a political debate surrounding the future of the banking sector. With the government still holding a stake in Lloyds, it would be of little surprise if the main political parties were to attempt to engage voters through new policies regarding what to do with the stake. This could cause uncertainty in the future of Lloyds to mount and hurt sentiment in the early to mid part of 2015, while a change in government/government policy after the election could mean that the sale of Lloyds proceeds at a slower pace than is currently envisaged. Both of these changes could have a negative impact on Lloyds’ share price performance in 2015. Dividend Growth With interest rate rises seemingly taking a back seat as a result of lower-than-expected inflation, investor hunger for yields could see an uptick next year. Although Lloyds is only just beginning the process of paying dividends, it has grand aims for its shareholder payouts. Indeed, Lloyds is aiming to pay out up to two thirds of profit as a dividend in 2016. This means that, at current prices, Lloyds could be yielding 3.9% in 2015, which is ahead of the FTSE 100’s current yield of around 3.4%. This could attract income investors to Lloyds and see a different group of investors (dividend hunters) maintain demand for the shares next year, which would clearly be positive news for the bank’s share price. Looking Ahead Based on current year forecasts, Lloyds looks exceptionally cheap. While the FTSE 100 has a price to earnings (P/E) ratio of 14, Lloyds currently trades on a P/E ratio of just 9.7. As a result, an upward rerating is a realistic aim for 2015 and, crucially, would not necessarily require a strong performance from the FTSE 100. In fact, the performance of the UK economy could prove to be the major catalyst for Lloyds in 2015. With it being the fastest growing economy in the developed world, demand for new loans and a reduction in bad loans could prove to be the factors that matters most to Lloyds in 2015. As a result of this, as well as its income prospects and low valuation, Lloyds looks set to beat the wider index in 2015
02/3/2015
16:07
dudley nightshade: Lloyds bulls out in force It's been a long wait, but Lloyds (LLOY) is paying shareholders a dividend again. It is a major milestone for the lender and talk now shifts from "when" to "how much?" And the discussion has become increasingly optimistic. Many believe the bank is due a re-rating, too, which could drive the share price considerably higher. "The combination of recovering statutory profit, non-core rundown and DTA (deferred tax assets) utilisation is likely to drive Lloyds to be one of the most capital generative banks in Europe in coming years," says UBS. "For a bank that starts this phase already above its target capital ratio (12.8% vs the newly announced 12%) - the excess capital potential is material." By next year, the broker thinks Lloyds will have delivered a cumulative 7% dividend yield, and have 16% of current market capitalisation in excess capital. "Lloyds is already above its revised CET1 target, and remains highly capital generative (150-200bps capital generation pre-dividend now expected annually). We continue to see value in Lloyds' cash generative business model, and reiterate our Buy rating with a GGM based PT of 100p." On Friday, Lloyds said it made an underlying profit of £7.76 billion in 2014, up 26% as impairments fell by 60% and costs came by 2% to £9.4 billion. Including an extra £800 million of payment protection insurance (PPI) provisions in 2013 and last year's £710 million pension credit, statutory pre-tax profit surged fourfold to £1.76 billion. Meanwhile, the post-dividend Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio - a key measure of a bank's financial strength - increased to 12.8%, evidence that Lloyds has seriously de-risked the business. Lloyds trades on 1.5 times estimates for 2015 tangible net asset value (TNAV) for 13.3% return on tangible equity (RoTE) in 2016. However, UBS believes that if Lloyds manages a RoTE of 17% by 2015 on a lower than we presently assume cost of equity of 9%, "we think this would support a share price of c.130p". Nomura Elsewhere, Nomura reckons that if Lloyds can reduce the difference between underlying and reported earnings, regulators will be far more likely to allow payout ratios to rise. "PPI, TSB sale, and restructuring costs still remain a drag through 2015, but as we get into 2016-17, we think this rerating potential will likely come through," says the broker. "As Lloyds dividend yield improves from 2.9% in 2015 to 7% in 2016, on our estimates, with upside potential driven by a 16E 14.8% CET1 ratio, we expect Lloyds to rerate from a 16E P/E of 9.2x closer to north of 12x (where the Swedish banks trade)." It has a 'buy' rating and 90p target price on the shares, but thinks that increased political rhetoric around banking ahead of the May elections, plus with the drip share sale programme, will likely "put a cap on Lloyds' near-term performance". Deutsche Bank "An inaugural dividend of 0.75p, while welcome, is nothing compared with the 14p in dividend per share we forecast for 2015-2017 and 12p of capital we expect Lloyds to have earned above its 12% CT1 target at end 2017," says Deutsche Bank. "A special dividend will be inevitable in our view. Our earnings estimates and 94p target price are unchanged. Trading at 9.7x 2016 EPS and yielding 4% this year we think the stock far too cheap and retain our Buy recommendation." This article is for information and discussion purposes only and does not form a recommendation to invest or otherwise. The value of an investment may fall. The investments referred to in this article may not be suitable for all investors, and if in doubt, an investor should seek advice from a qualified investment adviser. Share this

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