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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group Plc LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.425 -0.98% 43.01 134,468,814 16:35:15
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
42.92 42.935 43.625 42.775 42.91
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 37,444.00 6,902.00 7.50 5.7 29,955
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:16:00 O 195,082 43.094 GBX

Lloyds Banking (LLOY) Latest News (1)

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 JUPITER UK GROWTH INVESTMENT TRUST PLC 4.10% 2022-06-28

Lloyds Banking (LLOY) Discussions and Chat

Lloyds Banking (LLOY) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
16:16:0443.09195,08284,068.64O
16:15:5043.0820287.03O
16:15:1043.0156,99424,513.12O
16:10:2443.028,6553,723.21O
16:08:5043.011,680,399722,773.22O
View all Lloyds Banking trades in real-time

Lloyds Banking (LLOY) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
29/6/2022
09:20
Lloyds Banking Daily Update: Lloyds Banking Group Plc is listed in the Banks sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker LLOY. The last closing price for Lloyds Banking was 43.44p.
Lloyds Banking Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 41.97p and a 12 week average price of 41.97p.
The 1 year high share price is 55.96p while the 1 year low share price is currently 38.10p.
There are currently 69,647,400,492 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 190,688,544 shares. The market capitalisation of Lloyds Banking Group Plc is £29,955,346,951.61.
29/6/2022
16:04
stutes: Another clear out of senior bankers yet book value to share price discount continues- buyback seems to be a wasteful use of surplus cash - pay a bigger dividend and share price might increase?
28/6/2022
12:34
damanko: Apart from the last couple of posts, I'm amused that this is supposed to be an 'On topic thread' about Lloyds Banking Group. Perhaps there is another ADVFN thread, something like: 'Indians are very bright, work very hard, good at maths. And when Putin's government & army are murdering civilians out for a day's shopping, the nations of India (& China) can set all that stuff aside, and gratefully receive oil from Russia at a discounted price...' I'll keep looking, but haven't found that thread yet. Moving on, I've been a holder for many years, always reinvest the dividends, so somehow I'm in profit. But LLOY has become a day trader type of share. How sad is that, when 20 or so years ago the share price was over £3, and the dividend 30+p. Thanks Gordon Brown, what a bright Chancellor you were...
24/6/2022
09:07
hardup1: Post 20422.....I thought the BOD incentive bonuses are based on increasing EPS, not share price So a falling share price inevitably will translate into increased bonuses for BOD as the more shares bought back and cancelled will see and ever increasing EPS. It would be in share holders interests to have the BOD bonuses linked to increasing SP, not EPS.
16/6/2022
19:33
freddie01: Lloyds Banking Group buys UK protection advice firm By Cristian Angeloni, 16 Jun 22 In a bid to become a top-three provider by 2025 UK banking giant Lloyds Banking Group has acquired the entire share capital of protection business Cavendish Online for a total consideration of £12m ($15m, €14m). Cavendish provides hybrid solutions to consumers including guided and advised life insurance, critical illness and income protection services. Lloyds said the M&A deal will help support Halifax, Lloyds Bank and Bank of Scotland’s client needs. It added the firm will continue to provide mortgage-focused protection advice in its branches, as well as Scottish Widows-branded products via IFAs. At completion, Cavendish will continue to operate as a separate company within Lloyds and become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Scottish Widows Group. The protection business will also maintain its existing offices in Exeter and Fareham. The acquisition is part of Lloyds’ plans to become a top-three protection provider by 2025. Lack of cover Antonio Lorenzo, chief executive of Scottish Widows and group director, insurance and wealth, at Lloyds Banking Group, said: “We have both the opportunity and the responsibility to improve our customers’ financial resilience. 60% of UK adults have no form of life cover and just 12% have cover if they fall critically ill. “Our acquisition of Cavendish Online will enable us to help more of our customers at the times when we know they value advice.” Rose St Louis, protection director at Lloyds Banking Group, added: “Protection can be a tricky conversation, often triggered by key events in peoples’ lives and many people value discussing their options with someone, to make sure they’ve got the right cover for their specific circumstances. “The acquisition of Cavendish Online will enable us to provide advice and guidance to a broader range of customers, who are unlikely to access protection through an IFA, using the channel that best suits them and complements our existing mortgage focused in-branch service.” The deal is expected to complete in Q4 2022. hTtps://international-adviser.com/lloyds-banking-group-buys-uk-protection-advice-firm/
10/6/2022
11:34
marktime1231: No idea what to make of the BoE report today. Banks could fail without failing? I think I preferred it when the BoE Governor said very little. The buyback here seems to be going well, at a steady pace is fine, not spiking up the share price. LLOY have removed over 2 billion shares in issue at a 20% discount to tangible net asset value. There are moments when they could have hoovered some up at an even deeper discount but that is a little harsh given that the share price is affected by all sorts of unexpected macro. Besides, that sort of reactive trading is generally not how broker mandates work. It sounds like others are wishing the share price was already back in the 50's eg more expensive to buy back, so make your minds up what you really want. Another 2 billion to go. Combined with good trading this will hopefully support future dividend progress. For now I am content for the share price to be depressed and for the improving dividend prospect. Just need to be wary though, LLOY have a terrible track record of letting us down over the dividend. Despite some flattering comments by brokers and analysts LLOY shares remains deeply undervalued. I don't understand why but it is not the fault of the buyback programme.
06/6/2022
15:00
richie1218: I found some Q&A regarding the last Final dividend that I had not read before which some may find interesting. The final ordinary dividend of £0.0133 per share seems very low, given your excess capital position, and the almost 11% drop in the share price on the day of the announcement seems to reflect dividend disappointment. Why wasn’t it higher, and/or a special dividend paid? We note that at 2p/share, the total FY 2021 dividend represents a yield of over 4%, which compares favourably to the FTSE100 average yield. This was also in line with the market’s consensus expectations, which are available on our website. The Board needs to manage the different preferences of the Group’s investor base and hence part of the capital return in respect of 2021 was in the form of a newly-announced £2 billion share buyback (this is the preferred form of excess capital return for many of our institutional shareholders, particularly given the share price trading below book value), bringing total capital return in respect of 2021 to up to £3.4 billion, equivalent to 4.82p per share. Regarding share price performance on the day of results announcement, it is worth noting that the FTSE 350 banks index also fell by c.7% on the day, reflecting wider geopolitical concerns given the Russian invasion of Ukraine. We think that the underperformance of our share price versus peers reflects increased cost expectations given increased investment as part of our new strategy launch, which should however in turn generate higher revenues and shareholder returns over 2024-26. It is worth noting that the share price increased c.7% on the day following results. Is the Group still paying quarterly dividends? No, the Group has reverted to twice-yearly dividends (this was announced at the HY 21 results) due to a number of reasons - simpler capital planning – having fewer distribution points makes capital planning simpler and maintains average capital levels through the year, - simplicity – most FTSE100 companies pay half yearly dividends, and this is easier for investors as it means less printing/cashing of cheques, - sustainability – reducing the amount of mailing/printing of cheques for what would generally be small values. In practice, this is simply a question of timing and makes no difference to the overall quantum of capital returns that an investor may expect. How does your final dividend of £0.133 per share relate to your progressive dividend policy when it is much lower than the previous dividend? The Group is committed to a progressive and sustainable dividend policy. You can therefore expect to see progression in the dividend per share in 2022 and beyond, in line with this policy, from the starting point of total dividend of 2p per share paid in FY21. The ordinary dividend alone constituted a yield of 4% for 2021, while it would be around 10% including the share buyback, both comparing favourably with other FTSE 100 stocks. A few years ago it was stated the Group would pay approximately 50% of statutory profits in dividends. A total dividend payment of 2p is not anywhere near 50% of statutory profits for 2021. Has the bank changed its dividend policy? The Group has not given a specific payout ratio target but is committed to a progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy, whilst maintaining the flexibility to return surplus capital through buybacks or special dividends. Given the total ordinary dividend of 2p per share and the intended ordinary share buyback, equivalent to up to 2.82p per share, the total capital return in respect of 2021 will be up to 4.82p per share, which is equivalent to £3.4 billion or c.10% of current market capitalization. It is worth noting that 4.82p per share equates to 64% of our earnings per share of 7.5p. Two years ago the Group dividend was postponed at the request of the Bank of England because of Covid-19. When will this ‘postponedR17; dividend be paid? The Bank of England requested UK banks not to pay dividends due to Covid-19. Accordingly, on 1 April 2020 the Group announced that it would suspend dividend payments. Furthermore, the Board decided that until the end of 2020, the Group would undertake no quarterly or interim dividend payments, accrual of dividends, or share buybacks. The FY19 final dividend was therefore cancelled and we never made any statements about it being postponed. Once this ban was lifted, the Group was then able to reintroduce dividend payments with a final dividend of 0.57p at the end of 2020. We then reinstated a progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy with an interim ordinary dividend of 0.67p per share announced at the 2021 half year results in July 2021. The additional capital retained has in part enabled us to announce the share buyback of £2 billion. Why are you buying back shares when you just hold them in Treasury instead of cancelling them and then issue shares to employees so that it does not reduce the shares in issue? When we buy shares in the market, they are cancelled and not held in treasury; any issuance is an entirely separate transaction and unrelated to the buyback. The effect of a buyback is to reduce the total number of shares in issue. It is expected that shareholders who retain their shares in the company will benefit from the share buyback programme as they will own an increased proportion of the total shares in the company and should therefore see an increase in the dividend per share going forward given the reduced number of shares in issue. Our issued share capital fell in 2019 (from 71,790 to 70,713m shares), the most recent year in which we undertook a share buyback. In the event of future share buybacks, you would generally expect our share count to reduce. Share buybacks can be an effective use of excess capital, particularly when the shares are trading below book value. Assuming a £2 billion buyback and a 50p share price, our share count would reduce by 4,000m shares.
01/6/2022
08:34
bartram: Daily Telegraph - Questor Lloyds Buy tip (Wed June 1st.) Even if there is a recession, Lloyds’ shares are a steal Questor share tip: yes, the economic outlook is grim, but Lloyds is priced for a new financial crisis. As with all things in this column’s view, that takes us to valuation. The multiple of sales, earnings, profits and cash flow paid, or the dividend yield accepted, at the point of purchase is the ultimate arbiter of investment returns. The lower the multiple, the greater the potential gains – provided, at least, that the business model remains sound and defensible, management is competent and the balance sheet sufficiently robust to see the firm through any degree of trouble. This takes us, believe it or not, to a bank: Lloyds Banking Group, to be precise. Few tears will be shed by this column’s readers, but it is not much fun being a bank. Regulators, politicians and the public still remember the grief caused and the bill footed because of the global financial crisis. Regulation is tight, customers are happy to switch between accounts and lenders; competition, especially from new fintech upstarts, is fierce. Moreover, the world is swamped with debt, so growing your loan book without taking on risk is not as easy as it sounds, especially at a time when interest rates are still near historic lows. Lloyds Banking Group key facts Market value: £31.9bn Turnover (Dec 2022 estimate): £16.4bn Pre-tax profits (Dec 2022 est): £6.1bn Yield (Dec 2022 est): 5.2pc Most recent year’s divi: 2p Loan-to-deposit ratio (Dec 2021): 94pc Return on equity (Dec 2021): 13.8pc Cash conversion ratio (Dec 2021): 68pc p/e ratio (Dec 2022 est): 7.5 You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY
31/5/2022
11:00
jrphoenixw2: DT/Questor column this morning: Even if there is a recession, Lloyds’ shares are a steal Questor share tip: yes, the economic outlook is grim, but Lloyds is priced for a new financial crisis Markets continue to fret about the prospect of sticky inflation on one hand and rising interest rates and the risk of a recession on the other. Bond and share prices are wobbling at the same time, not helped in Britain by uncanny echoes of the 1970s, when the end of the Barber boom, oil price shocks, inflation and confiscatory tax policies hammered bonds and stocks alike and made it hard to preserve capital, let alone accumulate it. Whether the increase in capital gains tax and the windfall tax on oil are the end of the Government’s cash grab or just the start remains to be seen, but the public debt is still growing. After a four-decade span when capital has had its wicked way with labour it is also possible – healthy, even, from the point of view of social cohesion – that the tables may be turning, to the detriment of corporate profits and potentially investors’ returns. The question then is how portfolio builders can seek shelter. As with all things in this column’s view, that takes us to valuation. The multiple of sales, earnings, profits and cash flow paid, or the dividend yield accepted, at the point of purchase is the ultimate arbiter of investment returns. The lower the multiple, the greater the potential gains – provided, at least, that the business model remains sound and defensible, management is competent and the balance sheet sufficiently robust to see the firm through any degree of trouble. This takes us, believe it or not, to a bank: Lloyds Banking Group, to be precise. Few tears will be shed by this column’s readers, but it is not much fun being a bank. Regulators, politicians and the public still remember the grief caused and the bill footed because of the global financial crisis. Regulation is tight, customers are happy to switch between accounts and lenders; competition, especially from new fintech upstarts, is fierce. Moreover, the world is swamped with debt, so growing your loan book without taking on risk is not as easy as it sounds, especially at a time when interest rates are still near historic lows. Throw in fears of a recession and investors could be forgiven for asking why anyone would choose to be bullish on a bank. Well, you don’t have to be particularly bullish. Lloyds Banking Group key facts Market value: £31.9bn Turnover (Dec 2022 estimate): £16.4bn Pre-tax profits (Dec 2022 est): £6.1bn Yield (Dec 2022 est): 5.2pc Most recent year’s divi: 2p Loan-to-deposit ratio (Dec 2021): 94pc Return on equity (Dec 2021): 13.8pc Cash conversion ratio (Dec 2021): 68pc p/e ratio (Dec 2022 est): 7.5 You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. Yes, times could get a lot tougher and bad debts could start to pile up again, but it feels like net interest margins have bottomed, at least for now, and analysts are already forecasting no growth in pre-tax profits out to 2025. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY Share price at close: 45.14p Russ Mould is investment director at AJ Bell, the stockbroker htTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/even-recession-lloyds-shares-steal/
31/5/2022
08:20
cwa1: Not sure which LLOY thread is the best to post on so I'll drop it in here as it claims to be moderated and see if anyone is interested. Questor says "BUY":- https://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/even-recession-lloyds-shares-steal/ You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. Yes, times could get a lot tougher and bad debts could start to pile up again, but it feels like net interest margins have bottomed, at least for now, and analysts are already forecasting no growth in pre-tax profits out to 2025. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY Share price at close: 45.14p
25/5/2022
12:11
back2basics1: “Lloyds shares drop to 44p. Should I buy now?”: “Lloyds shares currently trade at 44.02p, almost 12p (-21.4%) below their January high. But they have also bounced back 15.5% from their 7 March low. What’s more, trading on a price-to-earnings ratio of 5.9 and an earnings yield of almost 17%, the shares appear to be among the cheapest FTSE 100 stocks. I may be missing something, but it seems to me that Mr Market has marked down this stock into bargain-bin territory. Furthermore, I’m attracted to the bank’s dividend yield of 4.5% a year, which beats the Footsie’s 4% cash yield. In summary, there’s a whole lot to worry about around the world right now. But I see all this pessimism as built into Lloyds shares today. Hence, though I don’t own this stock, I would buy Lloyds shares today for their cash dividends and hoped-for future capital gains!” HTTPS://www.fool.co.uk/2022/05/25/lloyds-shares-drop-to-44p-should-i-buy-now/
Lloyds Banking share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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