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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group Plc LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.81p +1.40% 58.66p 25,415,128 10:23:01
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
58.66p 58.68p 58.82p 58.10p 58.15p
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 22,091.00 5,960.00 5.50 10.7 41,569.0

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09:22:5058.662,5301,484.10AT
09:22:3758.654,7902,809.34AT
09:22:3758.651,104647.50AT
09:22:3758.652,6651,563.02AT
09:22:3458.6514,3998,445.01O
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Lloyds Banking (LLOY) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
24/5/2019
09:20
Lloyds Banking Daily Update: Lloyds Banking Group Plc is listed in the Banks sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker LLOY. The last closing price for Lloyds Banking was 57.85p.
Lloyds Banking Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 57.52p and a 12 week average price of 57.52p.
The 1 year high share price is 66.79p while the 1 year low share price is currently 49.52p.
There are currently 70,864,314,036 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 198,096,440 shares. The market capitalisation of Lloyds Banking Group Plc is £41,604,438,770.54.
04/5/2019
19:38
grupo: www.ii.co.uk/analysis-commentary/lloyds-banking-group-q1-results-analysis-ii508171 Lloyds Banking Group: Q1 results analysis by Graeme Evans from interactive investor | 2nd May 2019 12:19 After a stunning share price performance, do these 'hit and miss' results justify optimism? Lloyds Banking Group (LSE:LLOY) investors, in need of a silver lining after an underwhelming earnings season from UK lenders, only have to look back 24 hours to the surprise gift handed to the bank by regulators yesterday. Analysts think the decision by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) allowing Lloyds to reduce its risk buffer has the potential to increase the capacity for share buy-backs by £1 billion in 2019. Investec Securities' Ian Gordon called it "just the tonic" ahead of today's first-quarter results. As it turned out, the news helped to soften the blow of today's figures as Lloyds mirrored the disappointing top-line performances already seen by Barclays (LSE:BARC) and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group (LSE:RBS). Adjusted revenues were 4% below market consensus at £4.4 billion, while unchanged pre-tax profits of £1.6 billion also came in slightly below hopes. Remarkably, the seemingly never-ending payment protection insurance (PPI) compensation story continues to hang over Lloyds' numbers after the bank set aside another £100 million in today's results. The softer income performance has been seen across the UK banking sector at the start of 2019, contributing to the slow pace in the recovery of Lloyds shares from the 50p low in December. Fierce competition and low interest rates continue to put pressure on margins in the mortgage market while Brexit uncertainty is hampering business investment. Lloyds appears to be weathering the storm, however, after today's net interest margin fell just one basis point on the previous quarter to 2.91%. Last Friday, RBS said its margin fell to 1.89% from 1.95%. There was also praise for the bank's performance on driving down operating expenses after its cost:income ratio showed further improvement at 44.7%. Credit quality is also strong, with the impairment provision of £275 million only slightly higher than the previous quarter. While chief executive António Horta-Osório remains alert to the economic impact of Brexit, he offered a measure of reassurance today by sticking to the group's targets for 2019. These include maintaining the net interest margin at 2.9% and delivering operating costs of below £8 billion as Lloyds seeks a cost:income ratio in the low 40s by next year. Lloyds is also eyeing a return on equity figure of between 14% and 15% in 2019, compared with 12.5% in the current quarter. The tight control of the business has already enabled a share buyback of £1.75 billion, alongside a dividend yield of above 5%. Source: TradingView Past performance is not a guide to future performance Yesterday's announcement from the PRA on the systemic risk buffer requirement for UK's ring-fenced banks should give Lloyds more room to move in terms of future shareholder returns. Lloyds now thinks the current level of capital required to grow the business as well as meet regulatory requirements and cover uncertainties has reduced from around 13% to 12.5%, plus a management buffer of around 1%. It pointed out it had a "progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy" and that it would continue to give consideration to the distribution of surplus capital at the end of the year. UBS analyst Jason Napier thinks the PRA news has increased the 2019 pay-out capacity by £1 billion or 2.5% of market cap. When added to Lloyds' own capital generation target, this amounts to the potential for total pay-outs of 10% of market cap for 2019. He continues to have a price target of 80p on Lloyds, while also backing Barclays and RBS as his other 'buy' recommendations in UK banking. Napier, who values Lloyds at 7.1 times 2020 earnings, said: "We think the stock is good value in absolute and relative terms despite the lower Q1 print." These articles are provided for information purposes only. Occasionally, an opinion about whether to buy or sell a specific investment may be provided by third parties. The content is not intended to be a personal recommendation to buy or sell any financial instrument or product, or to adopt any investment strategy as it is not provided based on an assessment of your investing knowledge and experience, your financial situation or your investment objectives. The value of your investments, and the income derived from them, may go down as well as up. You may not get back all the money that you invest. The investments referred to in this article may not be suitable for all investors, and if in doubt, an investor should seek advice from a qualified investment adviser. Full performance can be found on the company or index summary page on the interactive investor website. Simply click on the company's or index name highlighted in the article.
21/4/2019
09:39
florenceorbis: One ‘hidden’ reason I think Lloyds Banking Group shares could disappoint Kevin Godbold | Sunday, 21st April, 2019 | More on: View of Canary Wharf Image source: Getty Images. There’s no shortage of bullish opinions about Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) and one of the main arguments is that the valuation looks cheap. The dividend yield is high and, to many commentators, the bank looks like it’s poised for recovery after many troubled years since the financial crisis. However, Foolish writer Martin Bodenham punched out an article recently that added to my bearishness about Lloyds and which made me think about a ‘hidden’ reason for avoiding the shares. His article bore the headline ‘Why dividend yields don’t matter to me’ and he made a good argument for targeting total investor returns over dividend income. Two steps forward, two back Let’s face it, if you look at Lloyds’ history over the past few years total returns have taken a bashing from that wiggly share price. It looks like a strong case of two steps forward with dividend income only to have your gains wiped out later by two steps back with the share price. But when searching for potential investments, Martin considers the most important indicator to be Return on Capital (ROC) and not the dividend yield at all. His reasoning is compelling. When talking about any company, he said: “There is no better measure to demonstrate the effectiveness of its leadership team in exploiting the business’s competitive position in the market.” Indeed, a high ROC figure can lead to strong performance from a share price even though a firm’s dividend yield may be low. Instead of paying cash back to shareholders, many firms with a high ROC plough money back into their businesses to make the most of their opportunities for growth. One thing that screams out to me about Lloyds is its poor showing on all the traditional quality indicators. One popular share screening website has the ROC running at just 0.75% and the Return on Equity at 8%. The operating margin looks better at around 21%, but the bank has had to build that up from almost zero in 2013, which is another sign of the fragility of the underlying business, in my view. Commodity-style, cyclical outfits Banks tend to be highly financially geared. They have to be to turn any kind of worthwhile profit. But they are also cyclical and lacking in any meaningful competitive advantages over their peers. Banks such as Lloyds are commodity-style outfits and profitable operations depend on a number of economic variables. If we see a half-decent general economic slump at some point, my guess is that Lloyds profits, the dividend, and the shares will all plunge. And that’s what I reckon the stock market as a whole is worried about with Lloyds. After a long period of strong profits from the firm, I reckon the market is pegging and shrinking the valuation in anticipation of the next downturn. To me, the share is good for trading short term to ride the cyclical ups and downs in the share price. However, I wouldn’t try to use Lloyds as a long-term dividend-led investment and I’m not expecting a prolonged surge in the share price because of the company ‘exploiting its competitive position in the market’. Stock-Market Millionaire Full of Foolish wisdom, the free Special Free Report “10 Steps To Making A Million In The Market” lays out what we consider vital advice that can help create a possible £1 million portfolio! Take Step 6, for instance - Harness The Full Power Of Reinvested Dividends. While these cash payments may initially be small in relation to the capital value of the investment, reinvesting them into yet more shares can dramatically enhance your portfolio’s return! To see the jaw-dropping example we use to back up our case, as well as access to the remaining nine steps, click here to get your copy free of charge. Kevin Godbold has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
12/4/2019
11:49
maywillow: Where next for the Lloyds Banking Group PLC share price after 22% gain in 2019? Could the Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) (LLOY.L) share price deliver further growth? April 9, 2019 Robert Stephens Lloyds Share Price Lloyds Banking Group PLC Lloyds Banking Group PLC It’s been a strong start to 2019 for the Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) (LLOY.L) share price. It has risen by around 22% since the start of the year, which is twice the return delivered by the FTSE 100 during the same time period. In my opinion, there could be volatility ahead for the stock depending on what happens with Brexit. However, in the long run I remain optimistic about the Lloyds share price as a result of its low valuation and what I consider to be a sound strategy. Risks With the Brexit process now set to be dragged out due to an impasse in Parliament, I wouldn’t be surprised if investor sentiment becomes increasingly changeable in the short run. Investors seem to be favouring a softer Brexit, since it could mean less change for the UK economy. But I think that it is difficult to know what will happen, and that as the process drags out that UK-focused shares such as Lloyds could see their share prices become increasingly volatile. Of course, with the UK economy forecast to grow by just 1.2% this year, its prospects appear to be relatively downbeat. Alongside this, consumer confidence is at a low level, which could mean that there are challenges ahead in the near term. Return potential That said, employment levels in the UK are high, while wage growth is beating inflation at the moment. This could mean that operating conditions for Lloyds are stronger than many investors are anticipating. This matches up with the bank’s recent updates, with its financial and operational performance suggesting to me that the economic landscape may be more robust than investors are pricing in. In terms of valuation, the Lloyds share price currently has a P/E ratio of 8.2. This suggests to me that it could offer good value for money, and there may be a margin of safety on offer. As per its its strategy, it is continuing to reduce costs as it seeks to become more efficient. It is also investing heavily in digital banking, which I feel is a sound move at a time when consumers are becoming increasingly dependent on mobile banking apps rather than their local branch. Together, higher investment and lower costs could create a more profitable bank over the long run. Investment potential Lloyds has strong recovery potential in my view. Even after its recent stock price rise, it continues to trade well below its five-year high. Although it may take time for it to reach higher share price levels after its recent rise, its valuation and strategy suggest to me that it could offer investment potential. Sure, Brexit may cause disruption and volatility in the short run. But over the long term I remain optimistic about the prospects for the company after what has been a strong start to 2019.
12/4/2019
09:52
florenceorbis: Why I believe the Lloyds share price could soon return to 90p Alan Oscroft | Wednesday, 10th April, 2019 | More on: LLOY A stock price graph showing growth over time Image source: Getty Images. Let me confess upfront — I’ve been expecting the Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) share price to soon return to 90p for a few years now. Lloyds shares are on a P/E of only eight, with forecast dividend yields of 5.5%, and rising. Dividends would be covered more than twice by earnings and, on the face of it, I’d say that looks like a bargain valuation. But when the market pushes a whole sector down you have to pay attention, and a low valuation is not necessarily an incorrect one. So what reasons are there for a bearish stance on Lloyds? The elephant Fellow Fool Royston Wild explains what clearly seems to be the biggest threat, a no-deal Brexit. Should that come to pass, much of the country will have a lot more to worry about than the price of Lloyds shares. We could be facing critical shortages, and would very likely experience a lengthy period of worsening economic gloom. While our departure from the EU was looking like happening by the planned date, or soon after, I thought the lifting of that millstone could well trigger an uprating of the financial sector. But that was on the assumption that we’d actually get a deal, and if we don’t, then the financial underpinning of the economy will surely suffer — the banks, that is. But Royston was writing a week ago, and that’s a long time. Since then, Prime Minister Theresa May has done the unthinkable and started talking to the Labour Party to try to reach an agreement. Delays And as she’s off trying to get another delay, it seems the heads of Europe are talking about a flexible extension of up to a year. That sounds very sensible to me — I’d much prefer Brexit to be done right than done quick. On the upside for Lloyds, if there’s a significant delay then that could drag us back from the brink of a no-deal disaster. On the downside, further delays could turn soon into maybe not quite so soon yet. There are plenty of other difficulties facing Lloyds and the other big banks. As Royston also points out, there’s increasing pressure in the mortgage market, and with Lloyds now pretty much refocused as a UK retail operation, it’s susceptible to that. But I think the share price has always taken into account those easily-seen uncertainties, and then some — current share valuations look far more discounted to me than is justified on such grounds. Turning? I also see sentiment changing. Lloyds shares are in a bit of a rally right now, having doubled the FTSE 100’s performance since the start of the New Year — Lloyds shares are up 20% compared to the index’s 10% gain. I can’t help feeling that suggests investors are coming to realise their fears are overblown and the shares are oversold. With the risk of a no-deal Brexit looking like it might be pushed back, again, I really can see Lloyds shares regaining 90p, and then more. But depending on the length of our next delay (assuming we get one), we might have to be flexible over the value of soon. Financial Independence, Retire Early If you’ve ever dreamt of retiring early, or if you’re already retired and protecting your financial independence is your aim, then this could be the report for you! We at The Motley Fool are pleased to offer you “The Foolish Guide To Financial Independence And Retiring Early” completely free of charge – simply click here to receive these expert insights and strategies. Alan Oscroft owns shares of Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
24/3/2019
13:56
xtrmntr: I just can't see why Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) isn't the best bargain in the FTSE 100 right now.I hold some in my SIPP, and though the share price has been disappointing over the past couple of years, I've enjoyed some healthy dividends - and I'm looking for a decade and more of steady, and rising, annual income.That, in a nutshell, is my ISA strategy too. I largely ignore the share price as long as it's not looking overvalued, and concentrate on the prospects for dividend yields over the long term.DividendsRight now, Lloyds dividends have recovered strongly from the financial meltdown and are forecast to yield 5.3% this year and 5.6% next. The payments would be more than twice covered by earnings too, which gives me confidence that they'll be sustainable over the long term.The fact that Lloyds shares are priced on a P/E multiple of under nine, well below the FTSE 100's long-term average, is something I see as an extra - and any share price appreciation over the next 10 years or so will be a bonus.A low P/E can be a sign of caution too, as it can indicate a share price that's low for a good reason. But with Lloyds, I really don't see any need for such a bearish view based on the company itself. I can only see the share price weakness down to the malaise that's still afflicting the financial sector, with fears greatly boosted by the uncertainty surrounding Brexit.CashThe bank is well capitalised, is growing profits, has strong cash flow, and its UK retail focus makes it, I think, the UK bank best insulated from the effects of Brexit.My colleague Rupert Hargreaves has pointed to what I agree is Lloyds' biggest risk right now, its exposure to the housing market. As the UK's largest mortgage lender, there's a fear that Lloyds could see bad debts rise should we face a falling housing market, and it could then have to make financial provisions for that.But while the housing market is cooling, prices are holding up, and I see that as a good sign for the market in general as we're in one of our toughest economic periods for some years. The housing market is also seriously, and chronically, undersupplied - and a serious shortage does 't usually presage a falling market.Valuation?What could Lloyds shares be worth in the long term? Even if the economic risk warrants a P/E below the Footsie's long-term average of around 14, I can't help seeing a multiple of about 12 being justified in the long term - especially if the bank's healthy dividend yields don't come under threat in the next couple of years.That would suggest a share price of around 87p, a premium of a third over today's price. But even without that, a 5.6% dividend yield on today's price, reinvested in more Lloyds shares, would grow £1,000 invested today into £1,725 in 10 years on its own.And that's why, in addition to having some in my SIPP, I have Lloyds shares down on my 2019 ISA shortlist too.
15/3/2019
14:56
goldpiguk: xxxxxy, As the risk of leaving the EU reduces the LLOY share price rises. I am hoping for an eventual win win here - staying in the EU and LLOY moving higher. MPs are doing exactly what they are being paid to do. They know full well it would be irresponsible in the extreme to turn their backs on our international agreements and ignore our commitment to the Good Friday Agreement, to deliberately harm our economy, to damage our trading prospects and to create uncertainty lasting for years. Most MPs on both sides of the debate undoubtedly believe they are acting in the best interests of the country and as a result we have gridlock. The majority of MPs now recognise the damage of walking away from the EU without a deal would have on our future trade. It was after all because of these massive benefits that we originally joined the EEC. The people who ran the Leave campaign all made it sound so easy but most ran away from actually taking the lead after the referendum. The leavers were split among themselves. Gove stabbed Boris Johnson in the back, Fox had different ideas about Brexit than many others in the Leave campaign and Andrea Leadsom pulled out of the race against May leaving a Remainer to take charge of the issue. Farage never even made it to Parliament after seven attempts. The success of the leave campaign relied on appearing to be united when they were in fact deeply split amongst themselves. Scream and shout all you want but there has to be some form of consensus eventually if we are to move forward. I strongly believe this would be best achieved through a legally binding peoples vote. If the public votes to leave we would depart otherwise we would remain in the EU with our veto on a European Army, our veto on European Taxes and our veto on any attempts to bring about a USE (United States of Europe. Instead we would be able to influence the future direction the EU, which long term would be a highly beneficial outcome for us. You are free at any time to boycott wine from Europe. There are a number of very good English wines to try out (Waitrose). Staycations have also become more popular in recent years. You will be able to avoid the form filling that will soon be required for EU travel if we leave. I think you will be able to buy these online. Buying cars made in the UK may well become more problematic. With Dyson now planning to build his electric cars in Singapore where he will have free access to the EU market and car manufacturers scaling back their planes to make them in the UK (or even stop them completely) you may well have to buy from abroad and stump up a few thousand pounds more because of tariffs that will come in a couple of years if we leave. You should be able to avoid the tariffs by buying second hand, but beware those rising costs of running higher polluting older vehicles. Goldpig
14/3/2019
09:07
blusteradjuster: LLOY appears to be breaking out. Can someone please direct me to a thread discussing what might happen next to the LLOY share price? TIA.
13/3/2019
12:36
cheshire pete: WONG FOO KING SHARE #789: "Is Lloyds ever discussed or is this thread just full of old farts in Brexit dreams?" What do you want to discuss then? Share price going forward, long term, short term projections? Brexit relevant to LLOY share price imho, for evidence just look at the movements yesterday in the lead up to and after Geoffrey Cox's letter and speech.
15/1/2019
11:51
jordaggy: Only popping in as this was just emailed to me from seeking alpha... Corporate Fundamentals Outperforming Share Prices The past year proved difficult and volatile for equity investors, ourselves certainly included. But did this downward price movement accurately reflect a change in the fundamentals of the Fund’s investments? We think not. We focus on cash flow generation, balance sheet strength, management’s deployment of capital, private market transactions, corporate insider buying and a host of other factors, which help us measure the intrinsic value per share of our holdings. Businesses with growing intrinsic value per share and declining share prices are opportunities for additional investment. Two such holdings in the Fund portfolio are Lloyds Banking Group and General Motors. Lloyds is the Fund’s second-largest international holding. The company’s share price declined 25% in 2018, resulting in a negative return contribution of 112 basis points. Despite the poor performance of the stock price, the company’s earnings and capital generation were actually in-line with expectations and its underlying fundamentals remain strong and are expected to improve further in 2019. Lloyds is the largest retail bank in the U.K., commanding a market share of nearly 25% of the consolidated U.K. banking market in which the top four participants control nearly 80% of the market, combined. Additionally, the company’s management team has improved operational efficiency, reduced exposure to more economically sensitive asset classes and built excess capital. For instance, Lloyds’ commercial real estate exposure has fallen to only 3.6% of group loans and its underwriting remains quite conservative, as evidenced by the company’s residential mortgage book, which boasts an average loan to value of 43.5%. Meanwhile, Lloyds has maintained an excess capital position of approximately two billion pounds, despite returning GBP 3.2 billion to investors during 2018. We expect the company to generate an underlying return on tangible capital in the mid-teens for 2018, despite its excess capital position and we believe that additional cost efficiencies could boost underlying returns even further. We estimate Lloyds will report a return on tangible equity of roughly 13% for 2018. However, this metric is being restrained by provisions for the mis-selling of legacy payment protection insurance products. This liability will sunset in August of 2019, and as a result, we believe the company’s reported profitability should improve in both 2019 and 2020. We recognize that uncertainties surrounding Brexit could create a softer economic environment. To analyze this risk, we have factored in various adverse scenarios to gauge the potential effects on Lloyds’ earnings and its capital, and as a result, we believe that the company will be able to navigate any short-term headwinds because of its strong earnings generation, conservative underwriting and large excess capital position. We estimate conservatively that Lloyds is trading at 5-6x reported 2020 earnings and approximately 0.8x its 2020 tangible book value. This is a highly discounted valuation for a best-in-class financial institution. Financial industry holdings, such as Lloyds, impaired portfolio return in 2018, and the consumer durables industry, including automobile manufacturers, was another that meaningfully detracted. We continue to believe that the automotive sector is attractively priced and that its business fundamentals are far outperforming share price outcomes.
30/11/2018
21:03
diku: Alp...what would be the purpose of writing about lloy share price for next Monday as per your post of 238126...the journo could have various agendas...it can be perceived as a recommendation or not depends upon the article...
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