Lloyds Banking Dividends - LLOY

Lloyds Banking Dividends - LLOY

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Stock Name Stock Symbol Market Stock Type
Lloyds Banking Group Plc LLOY London Ordinary Share
  Price Change Price Change % Stock Price Last Trade
-1.31 -3.07% 41.355 16:29:59
Open Price Low Price High Price Close Price Previous Close
43.085 41.335 43.275 41.355 42.665
more quote information »
Industry Sector
BANKS

Lloyds Banking LLOY Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Period Start Period End Ex Date Record Date Payment Date Total Dividend Amount
24/02/2022FinalGBX1.3331/12/202031/12/202107/04/202208/04/202219/05/20222
29/07/2021InterimGBX0.6731/12/202031/12/202105/08/202106/08/202113/09/20210
24/02/2021FinalGBX0.5731/12/201931/12/202015/04/202116/04/202125/05/20210.57
31/07/2019InterimGBX1.1231/12/201831/12/201908/08/201909/08/201913/09/20191.12
20/02/2019FinalGBX2.1431/12/201731/12/201804/04/201905/04/201921/05/20193.21
01/08/2018InterimGBX1.0731/12/201731/12/201816/08/201817/08/201826/09/20180
21/02/2018FinalGBX2.0531/12/201631/12/201719/04/201820/04/201829/05/20183.05
27/07/2017InterimGBX131/12/201631/12/201710/08/201711/08/201727/09/20170
22/02/2017FinalGBX1.731/12/201531/12/201606/04/201707/04/201716/05/20173.05
22/02/2017SpecialGBX0.531/12/201531/12/201606/04/201707/04/201716/05/20170
28/07/2016InterimGBX0.8531/12/201531/12/201611/08/201612/08/201628/09/20160
25/02/2016FinalGBX1.531/12/201431/12/201507/04/201608/04/201617/05/20162.75
25/02/2016SpecialGBX0.531/12/201431/12/201507/04/201608/04/201617/05/20160
31/07/2015InterimGBX0.7530/12/201430/06/201513/08/201514/08/201528/09/20150
27/02/2015FinalGBX0.7531/12/201331/12/201402/04/201507/04/201519/05/20150.75
26/02/2010FinalGBX031/12/200831/12/200901/01/197001/01/197001/01/19700
27/02/2009FinalGBX031/12/200731/12/200801/01/197001/01/197001/01/197011.4
06/05/2008InterimGBX11.430/12/200730/06/200806/08/200808/08/200801/10/200811.4
22/02/2008FinalGBX24.731/12/200631/12/200705/03/200807/03/200807/05/200835.9
31/07/2007InterimGBX11.230/12/200630/06/200708/08/200710/08/200703/10/20070
25/02/2007FinalGBX23.531/12/200531/12/200607/03/200709/03/200702/05/200734.2
02/08/2006InterimGBX10.730/12/200530/06/200609/08/200611/08/200604/10/20060
24/02/2006FinalGBX23.531/12/200431/12/200508/03/200610/03/200603/05/200634.2
29/07/2005InterimGBX10.730/12/200430/06/200510/08/200512/08/200505/10/20050
04/03/2005FinalGBX23.531/12/200331/12/200416/03/200518/03/200504/05/200534.2
30/07/2004InterimGBX10.730/12/200330/06/200411/08/200413/08/200406/10/20040
08/03/2004FinalGBX23.529/12/200229/12/200317/03/200419/03/200405/05/200434.2
31/07/2003InterimGBX10.730/12/200230/06/200313/08/200315/08/200308/10/20030
14/02/2003FinalGBX23.531/12/200131/12/200226/02/200328/02/200307/05/200334.2
02/08/2002InterimGBX10.730/12/200130/06/200214/08/200216/08/200209/10/20020
15/02/2002FinalGBX23.531/12/200031/12/200127/02/200201/03/200201/05/200233.7
27/07/2001InterimGBX10.230/12/200030/06/200108/08/200110/08/200110/10/20010
16/02/2001FinalGBX21.331/12/199931/12/200028/02/200102/03/200102/05/200130.6
28/07/2000InterimGBX9.330/12/199930/06/200007/08/200011/08/200011/10/20000
11/02/2000FinalGBX18.531/12/199831/12/199921/02/200025/02/200003/05/200026.6
30/07/1999InterimGBX8.130/12/199830/06/199909/08/199913/08/199913/10/19990
12/02/1999FinalGBX15.531/12/199731/12/199822/02/199926/02/199905/05/199922.2
31/07/1998InterimGBX6.730/12/199730/06/199810/08/199814/08/199809/10/19980
13/02/1998FinalGBX11.931/12/199631/12/199723/02/199827/02/199801/05/199817.2

Top Dividend Posts

DateSubject
05/7/2022
16:51
richie1218: CS still pushing Lloy but i'm not sure about their "target price" for Lloy though but hey you never know :-) CREDIT SUISSE SEES VALUE IN UK BANKS, LLOYDS REMAINS 'TOP PICK' 5 July 2022 10:57 (Sharecast News) - Analysts at Credit Suisse sounded a bullish note for UK banks, explaining to clients that they now expected upgrades to lenders' guidance for net interest margins and net interest income. That they said was because their own house view had evolved in the direction of higher interest rates and softer growth. Lower growth and inflation meant that their target prices were unchanged. Nonetheless, "where they exist, provision overlays can offer substantial downside protection to our house view." In a research note sent to clients, analysts Omar Keenan and Alexander Demetriou remained at 'outperform' on Barclays (Target price: 245.0p), Lloyds (Target price: 245.0p) and NatWest (Target price: 300.0p). But on HSBC they were at 'neutral' (Target price: 525.0p) and on StanChart at 'underperform' (Target price: 510.0p) Furthermore, Lloyds remained their UK Banks top pick, as well as at the wider European level. Financial markets were under-appreciating the potential for Lloyds's return on tangible equity, they said. Ahead of the group's second quarter earnings. they estimated that Barclays's profit before tax would exceed consensus by the widest margin and HSBC by the least. Their 2024 earnings per share estimates meanwhile were revised most positively for Lloyds and NatWest, due to the rates changes the analysts made were most positive for the pair and the two faced fewer market-related revenue headwinds. Elsewhere, they only made minor changes ranging from 1-2.0%.
12/6/2022
12:51
polar fox: Perhaps you missed this in post 20200?? Two years ago the Group dividend was postponed at the request of the Bank of England because of Covid-19. When will this ‘postponedR17; dividend be paid? The Bank of England requested UK banks not to pay dividends due to Covid-19. Accordingly, on 1 April 2020 the Group announced that it would suspend dividend payments. Furthermore, the Board decided that until the end of 2020, the Group would undertake no quarterly or interim dividend payments, accrual of dividends, or share buybacks. The FY19 final dividend was therefore cancelled and we never made any statements about it being postponed. Once this ban was lifted, the Group was then able to reintroduce dividend payments with a final dividend of 0.57p at the end of 2020. We then reinstated a progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy with an interim ordinary dividend of 0.67p per share announced at the 2021 half year results in July 2021. The additional capital retained has in part enabled us to announce the share buyback of £2 billion. unquote
06/6/2022
15:00
richie1218: I found some Q&A regarding the last Final dividend that I had not read before which some may find interesting. The final ordinary dividend of £0.0133 per share seems very low, given your excess capital position, and the almost 11% drop in the share price on the day of the announcement seems to reflect dividend disappointment. Why wasn’t it higher, and/or a special dividend paid? We note that at 2p/share, the total FY 2021 dividend represents a yield of over 4%, which compares favourably to the FTSE100 average yield. This was also in line with the market’s consensus expectations, which are available on our website. The Board needs to manage the different preferences of the Group’s investor base and hence part of the capital return in respect of 2021 was in the form of a newly-announced £2 billion share buyback (this is the preferred form of excess capital return for many of our institutional shareholders, particularly given the share price trading below book value), bringing total capital return in respect of 2021 to up to £3.4 billion, equivalent to 4.82p per share. Regarding share price performance on the day of results announcement, it is worth noting that the FTSE 350 banks index also fell by c.7% on the day, reflecting wider geopolitical concerns given the Russian invasion of Ukraine. We think that the underperformance of our share price versus peers reflects increased cost expectations given increased investment as part of our new strategy launch, which should however in turn generate higher revenues and shareholder returns over 2024-26. It is worth noting that the share price increased c.7% on the day following results. Is the Group still paying quarterly dividends? No, the Group has reverted to twice-yearly dividends (this was announced at the HY 21 results) due to a number of reasons - simpler capital planning – having fewer distribution points makes capital planning simpler and maintains average capital levels through the year, - simplicity – most FTSE100 companies pay half yearly dividends, and this is easier for investors as it means less printing/cashing of cheques, - sustainability – reducing the amount of mailing/printing of cheques for what would generally be small values. In practice, this is simply a question of timing and makes no difference to the overall quantum of capital returns that an investor may expect. How does your final dividend of £0.133 per share relate to your progressive dividend policy when it is much lower than the previous dividend? The Group is committed to a progressive and sustainable dividend policy. You can therefore expect to see progression in the dividend per share in 2022 and beyond, in line with this policy, from the starting point of total dividend of 2p per share paid in FY21. The ordinary dividend alone constituted a yield of 4% for 2021, while it would be around 10% including the share buyback, both comparing favourably with other FTSE 100 stocks. A few years ago it was stated the Group would pay approximately 50% of statutory profits in dividends. A total dividend payment of 2p is not anywhere near 50% of statutory profits for 2021. Has the bank changed its dividend policy? The Group has not given a specific payout ratio target but is committed to a progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy, whilst maintaining the flexibility to return surplus capital through buybacks or special dividends. Given the total ordinary dividend of 2p per share and the intended ordinary share buyback, equivalent to up to 2.82p per share, the total capital return in respect of 2021 will be up to 4.82p per share, which is equivalent to £3.4 billion or c.10% of current market capitalization. It is worth noting that 4.82p per share equates to 64% of our earnings per share of 7.5p. Two years ago the Group dividend was postponed at the request of the Bank of England because of Covid-19. When will this ‘postponedR17; dividend be paid? The Bank of England requested UK banks not to pay dividends due to Covid-19. Accordingly, on 1 April 2020 the Group announced that it would suspend dividend payments. Furthermore, the Board decided that until the end of 2020, the Group would undertake no quarterly or interim dividend payments, accrual of dividends, or share buybacks. The FY19 final dividend was therefore cancelled and we never made any statements about it being postponed. Once this ban was lifted, the Group was then able to reintroduce dividend payments with a final dividend of 0.57p at the end of 2020. We then reinstated a progressive and sustainable ordinary dividend policy with an interim ordinary dividend of 0.67p per share announced at the 2021 half year results in July 2021. The additional capital retained has in part enabled us to announce the share buyback of £2 billion. Why are you buying back shares when you just hold them in Treasury instead of cancelling them and then issue shares to employees so that it does not reduce the shares in issue? When we buy shares in the market, they are cancelled and not held in treasury; any issuance is an entirely separate transaction and unrelated to the buyback. The effect of a buyback is to reduce the total number of shares in issue. It is expected that shareholders who retain their shares in the company will benefit from the share buyback programme as they will own an increased proportion of the total shares in the company and should therefore see an increase in the dividend per share going forward given the reduced number of shares in issue. Our issued share capital fell in 2019 (from 71,790 to 70,713m shares), the most recent year in which we undertook a share buyback. In the event of future share buybacks, you would generally expect our share count to reduce. Share buybacks can be an effective use of excess capital, particularly when the shares are trading below book value. Assuming a £2 billion buyback and a 50p share price, our share count would reduce by 4,000m shares.
01/6/2022
08:34
bartram: Daily Telegraph - Questor Lloyds Buy tip (Wed June 1st.) Even if there is a recession, Lloyds’ shares are a steal Questor share tip: yes, the economic outlook is grim, but Lloyds is priced for a new financial crisis. As with all things in this column’s view, that takes us to valuation. The multiple of sales, earnings, profits and cash flow paid, or the dividend yield accepted, at the point of purchase is the ultimate arbiter of investment returns. The lower the multiple, the greater the potential gains – provided, at least, that the business model remains sound and defensible, management is competent and the balance sheet sufficiently robust to see the firm through any degree of trouble. This takes us, believe it or not, to a bank: Lloyds Banking Group, to be precise. Few tears will be shed by this column’s readers, but it is not much fun being a bank. Regulators, politicians and the public still remember the grief caused and the bill footed because of the global financial crisis. Regulation is tight, customers are happy to switch between accounts and lenders; competition, especially from new fintech upstarts, is fierce. Moreover, the world is swamped with debt, so growing your loan book without taking on risk is not as easy as it sounds, especially at a time when interest rates are still near historic lows. Lloyds Banking Group key facts Market value: £31.9bn Turnover (Dec 2022 estimate): £16.4bn Pre-tax profits (Dec 2022 est): £6.1bn Yield (Dec 2022 est): 5.2pc Most recent year’s divi: 2p Loan-to-deposit ratio (Dec 2021): 94pc Return on equity (Dec 2021): 13.8pc Cash conversion ratio (Dec 2021): 68pc p/e ratio (Dec 2022 est): 7.5 You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY
31/5/2022
11:00
jrphoenixw2: DT/Questor column this morning: Even if there is a recession, Lloyds’ shares are a steal Questor share tip: yes, the economic outlook is grim, but Lloyds is priced for a new financial crisis Markets continue to fret about the prospect of sticky inflation on one hand and rising interest rates and the risk of a recession on the other. Bond and share prices are wobbling at the same time, not helped in Britain by uncanny echoes of the 1970s, when the end of the Barber boom, oil price shocks, inflation and confiscatory tax policies hammered bonds and stocks alike and made it hard to preserve capital, let alone accumulate it. Whether the increase in capital gains tax and the windfall tax on oil are the end of the Government’s cash grab or just the start remains to be seen, but the public debt is still growing. After a four-decade span when capital has had its wicked way with labour it is also possible – healthy, even, from the point of view of social cohesion – that the tables may be turning, to the detriment of corporate profits and potentially investors’ returns. The question then is how portfolio builders can seek shelter. As with all things in this column’s view, that takes us to valuation. The multiple of sales, earnings, profits and cash flow paid, or the dividend yield accepted, at the point of purchase is the ultimate arbiter of investment returns. The lower the multiple, the greater the potential gains – provided, at least, that the business model remains sound and defensible, management is competent and the balance sheet sufficiently robust to see the firm through any degree of trouble. This takes us, believe it or not, to a bank: Lloyds Banking Group, to be precise. Few tears will be shed by this column’s readers, but it is not much fun being a bank. Regulators, politicians and the public still remember the grief caused and the bill footed because of the global financial crisis. Regulation is tight, customers are happy to switch between accounts and lenders; competition, especially from new fintech upstarts, is fierce. Moreover, the world is swamped with debt, so growing your loan book without taking on risk is not as easy as it sounds, especially at a time when interest rates are still near historic lows. Throw in fears of a recession and investors could be forgiven for asking why anyone would choose to be bullish on a bank. Well, you don’t have to be particularly bullish. Lloyds Banking Group key facts Market value: £31.9bn Turnover (Dec 2022 estimate): £16.4bn Pre-tax profits (Dec 2022 est): £6.1bn Yield (Dec 2022 est): 5.2pc Most recent year’s divi: 2p Loan-to-deposit ratio (Dec 2021): 94pc Return on equity (Dec 2021): 13.8pc Cash conversion ratio (Dec 2021): 68pc p/e ratio (Dec 2022 est): 7.5 You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. Yes, times could get a lot tougher and bad debts could start to pile up again, but it feels like net interest margins have bottomed, at least for now, and analysts are already forecasting no growth in pre-tax profits out to 2025. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY Share price at close: 45.14p Russ Mould is investment director at AJ Bell, the stockbroker htTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/even-recession-lloyds-shares-steal/
31/5/2022
08:20
cwa1: Not sure which LLOY thread is the best to post on so I'll drop it in here as it claims to be moderated and see if anyone is interested. Questor says "BUY":- https://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/even-recession-lloyds-shares-steal/ You just have to look at the valuation, which is so lowly, on the basis of earnings, book value and yield, that it feels like a disaster on the scale of 2007-09 is already priced into the stock. If things don’t turn out to be that bad, the shares look cheap. And if things go even vaguely right at any stage, the shares could look like a steal. Income seekers may like the look of the 5.2pc forecast dividend yield, supplemented by share buybacks. Value hunters will latch on to the 57.5p a share of tangible net asset value, to which the shares trade at a 21.5pc discount, as if to already price in a major economic downturn. Those who seek shelter may warm to the sub-100pc loan-to-deposit ratio and the 16.3pc common equity tier 1 ratio, as both suggest that the bank is financially robust and able to get through any cyclical downturn that comes its way. Yes, times could get a lot tougher and bad debts could start to pile up again, but it feels like net interest margins have bottomed, at least for now, and analysts are already forecasting no growth in pre-tax profits out to 2025. The valuation factors in a lot of potential pain already and it might not take a lot to deliver some positive surprises, given the lowly expectations. This is not the case at a much greater number of companies, where multiples of earnings and book value are higher, yields lower, balance sheets less robust and forecasts for earnings growth more optimistic, so maybe Lloyds has the potential to be a port in a storm, at least for those investors who feel they may need one. Patient contrarians may now like to bank on Lloyds. Questor says: buy Ticker: LLOY Share price at close: 45.14p
25/5/2022
12:11
back2basics1: “Lloyds shares drop to 44p. Should I buy now?”: “Lloyds shares currently trade at 44.02p, almost 12p (-21.4%) below their January high. But they have also bounced back 15.5% from their 7 March low. What’s more, trading on a price-to-earnings ratio of 5.9 and an earnings yield of almost 17%, the shares appear to be among the cheapest FTSE 100 stocks. I may be missing something, but it seems to me that Mr Market has marked down this stock into bargain-bin territory. Furthermore, I’m attracted to the bank’s dividend yield of 4.5% a year, which beats the Footsie’s 4% cash yield. In summary, there’s a whole lot to worry about around the world right now. But I see all this pessimism as built into Lloyds shares today. Hence, though I don’t own this stock, I would buy Lloyds shares today for their cash dividends and hoped-for future capital gains!” HTTPS://www.fool.co.uk/2022/05/25/lloyds-shares-drop-to-44p-should-i-buy-now/
21/5/2022
21:33
onlylongterm9: Lloy - “UK Investor Magazine”: “it might be the right time to invest, as Lloyds has a record of bouncing back from economic disruption with strength. The company beat management expectations in its Q1 2022 results with a profit of £1.6 billion, surging ahead following the Covid-19 pandemic downturn. Lloyds shares valuation The banking giant currently has a PE ratio of 5.6, representing value when compared to peers, with HSBC Holdings at 8.6, NatWest at 8.8 and Standard Chartered at 9.8. Lloyds pays an attractive 4.6% dividend and has a robust dividend cover of 3.9, indicating that the company’s payouts are set to remain covered despite the looming inflationary pressure.” HTTPS://ukinvestormagazine.co.uk/lloyds-shares-and-the-looming-spectre-of-inflation-what-next-for-the-banking-group/
17/5/2022
22:17
thecomposer: "Lloyds shares drop 20% in 4 months. Should I buy now?": "At the current share price of 44.14p, the entire group is valued at £30.5bn. To me, this seems a modest price tag for a leading UK bank servicing around 30m customers. Indeed, if I were mega-billionaire Elon Musk, I’d much rather buy Lloyds than a deeply loss-making social-media company." "To me, Lloyds shares trade on undemanding fundamentals. At today’s price, the shares trade on a lowly price-to-earnings ratio of 5.9 and an earnings yield of 16.9%. Furthermore, the dividend yield of 4.5% a year beats the 4% cash yield on offer from the wider FTSE 100." "In short, as a veteran value investor, Lloyds shares look like a compelling buy to me." HTTPS://www.fool.co.uk/2022/05/17/lloyds-shares-drop-20-in-4-months-should-i-buy-now/
13/5/2022
14:27
thecomposer: scruff1, I fully understand that and also very well know that the Lloy ex-dividend date was 7 April, however what matters here is the actual “Payment Date” of next week (Thursday 19 May to which I’ve clearly referred in my post!), and SCRIP dividends, I for one plan to use my Lloy dividends (to be received in my share dealings account only next Thursday) to buy more Lloy shares, thereby also utilising current undervalued levels/market cap here (same as the buy backs will likely be doing here for all shareholders at current lowball valuations), all of course IMHO, please DYOR.
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