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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group Plc LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.81 -2.12% 37.32 37.205 37.23 38.15 35.805 38.14 327,276,335 16:35:24
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 42,356.0 4,393.0 3.5 10.7 26,413

Lloyds Banking Share Discussion Threads

Showing 335801 to 335819 of 335825 messages
Chat Pages: 13433  13432  13431  13430  13429  13428  13427  13426  13425  13424  13423  13422  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
26/11/2020
23:38
Former defence secretary under Obama administration written on his memoir about Biden.."I think he has been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades "Robert M. Gates "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War"
k38
26/11/2020
22:43
HOC devoid of common sense. Treasury has convinced Sunak to bankrupt the country Yet the waste of spacers want more. We cant afford yet the dim and blind would prefer to give it to Ruanda. Rather than
jl5006
26/11/2020
22:42
Excuse me I am clever. What a stupid reply, you pathetic clown.
cleverinvester
26/11/2020
22:27
Get this wrong.And it will be the Conservative Party RIP.No DealWTO
xxxxxy
26/11/2020
22:25
All quiet on the Negotiation Front.Hell to come.No No No DealWTO
xxxxxy
26/11/2020
22:23
agricolaPosted November 26, 2020 at 2:57 pm | PermalinkIn terms of what our host wishes to achieve through Brexit there is great cynicism as to what will be achieved by the constant toing and froing between Brussels and London. Not surprising when in the same newspaper on the same day one can read articles that contradict each other. It is as if the papers are trying to cover every possible outcome with little by way of fact that can be verified. From within the smoke of information it would appear that the EU would wish to retain some form of legal control over our fishing grounds, our ability to compete industrially in terms of financial support within international law, and to retain some form of control via the ECJ. On the part of the EU this would seem a basic lack of understanding of what a sovereign country is. Not surprising as they drive to reduce the sovereignty of their remaining members.For me it would be unacceptable to relinquish any of the above sovereign powers for an FTA with the EU. The EU must greatly fear our collective talents to make such demands. If that is the current state of the game then reversion to trade on WTO terms is no great hardship. Parliament and the British people deserve clarification by the PM in the HoC. It will not be acceptable for any final agreement to be pushed through Parliament on the nod, because I for one do not trust members of the HoC to even now understand the full implication of the peoples vote in 2016. Get this wrong and it is the end of the conservative party.
xxxxxy
26/11/2020
21:01
Alp have you caught the M2 flu...?..;))
k38
26/11/2020
20:56
I felt the first hour session yesterday was the final assault on a mini summit. Might be wrong, but nothing since has changed my mind. The Thanksgiving break leaves us rudderless and boy was the Coronavirus conference depressing today. Vaccine euphoria crushed, star ship warp speed no chance more like stage coach snail mail delivery and months of lockdown I reckon. Things seem a whole lot more depressing this week. UK plc looks clueless and bankrupt with only nurse and NHS worship to distract us.
stewart64
26/11/2020
20:48
Liberals eh, dont you just love em?
maxk
26/11/2020
20:47
Plenty of benefits for the boat people coming in everyweek
asa8
26/11/2020
20:24
Change your handle - you are certainly not very clever. This was your 33rd post under that handle - you need more practice - filtered.
alphorn
26/11/2020
20:23
You pathetic clown. Lloyds is nothing like the post office
cleverinvester
26/11/2020
19:34
Just in case ppl think that govts know what they are doing - sadly questionable. What might have happened if sense and argument and history had prevailed. Who thought that devolution would have provoked political anguish - each determined to use their powers. And the losers are us - the fantasists - drakeford - Sturg - not benevolent ppl
jl5006
26/11/2020
19:32
Lloyds is a bellwether of the UK economy. The domestic Post Office.
alphorn
26/11/2020
19:21
OK min I will, however I sold at just over $15000, and could have made quite a bit more if I had hung on, so that should please you.
mikemichael2
26/11/2020
19:20
gbh2: its obvious. If you are an investor looking to invest in Lloyds you will want to go to a thread that is full of information about Lloyds. You will get annoyed if you see a lot of non-Lloyds post. Obviously politics is relevant to banks (quantative easing, base rates, taxation, brexit etc). So if we get a good brexit deal expect a very good FTSE rally. If Biden carries on spending spending spending that too will be good for the UK. A rising tide raises all boats. However if bad brexit deal (or no deal) or Biden stops spending then real downer. Lloyds is more moved by macro political events then most companies. Provided its not over done.
netcurtains
26/11/2020
19:05
Odd how many complain about discussing subjects other than Lloyds, with ever adding anything other than complaints about people discussing anything but Lloyds :)
gbh2
26/11/2020
18:47
Do the maths ChancellorNovember 26, 2020By Tim Pope FCAThe Government spends private sector money. The private sector fills the public sector purse. The private sector either pays now through current tax or borrows now but pays later through deferred higher taxes. There is no escape. The country cannot tax its way to economic success. The Government cannot tax its way to long term sustainable job creation and full employment. Every increase in government spending means the private sector has less capital to invest, innovate, create jobs and grow our economy. Unless you believe in Communism and the control by the government of all assets and resources then the way to success is to reduce government expenditure to the minimum. The minimum necessary to achieve a safe and progressively wealthy society. A society where individuals retain as much of the money they earn as possible and thereby have the maximum freedom to enjoy the way of life they choose. The higher are taxes, the tighter are the people in the grip of government. People do not want to work all year round for the government. They would rather work for themselves and their personal freedom as much as possible. There seems to be a massive silence from this Conservative government or anyone else on speaking up for capitalism and its great superiority over socialism. No examples of successful socialist governments can be found. This contrasts with the fact that all countries who have contributed to advances of our society have been capitalist, free-market driven. Instead, politicians have embarked on a competition on who can give the electorate bribes by way of apparent freebies to get their votes and convince them it will not cost them any money. If they can legislate the cost onto the private sector, they regard that as a major win and have no regard to the negative effects on cost competitiveness that the private sector is stuck with. Parental leave is a great example. The result is a continual drift to socialism with all its costs. Economic growth becomes harder and harder as our competitive edge is eroded. Our Chancellor would do well to consider whether the expenditure programmes he proposes to stimulate our economy and create jobs would be better directed to tax cuts to stimulate the private sector to do the work. Past experience tells us this is the more successful and sustainable route. Tax reductions in the past have led to increases in the tax collected because of growth and a reduction in tax avoidance and evasion. A reset in our approach to our supply chains and our dependencies on others is long overdue. A few decades ago, it was regarded as too risky to have long supply chains and limited sources of supply. The consequences were that manufacturing was duplicated across territories and supply chains were either in country or in countries regarded as reliable from the point of view of incurring major risks, particularly political risk. This went out of the window when it became prevalent to regard the world as one great happy economic family. This led to 'rationalisation' on a huge scale. Granted this reduced industry cost. That aspect was very measurable. What it also did was increase all sorts of risks and create transfers of cost from the private sector to the public purse. The risks were not capable of easy measurement and the cost to the public purse was indirect. Every business closure in the UK because of the transfer of its capacity abroad created a social and economic cost picked up by the taxpayer, often for many years into the future. This rationalisation increased private sector business profits but we all picked up the increased social costs in higher taxation, problems of inequality and community decay.  We have enjoyed cheap goods from China. Often poor or poorer quality over time. China has got wealthy, not on its own merits but by the willing transfer of vast amounts of wealth from the West. The international trade surpluses enjoyed by China tell the tale. China is fast becoming a rogue nation. It is and will cause the West huge trouble. Our political leaders have led us sleepwalking into the grip of China. This virus from China has hopefully provided a long overdue wake up call for us to disengage from China, re-shore industrial capacity and grow our economy. To do this, the private sector must have the capital and risk appetite to embark on this new direction and chase it down to a successful end. Our Chancellor can hasten this by creating a tax environment to encourage it. Along with the opportunities of Brexit, we have a golden opportunity. Even better if we can get alliances and common policies with other like-minded nations. Now is certainly not the time to tie our hands by caving in to EU demands to get some form of trade deal. Let them put handcuffs on themselves if they wish but let us stay well clear and be free to do the good deals. Do the maths Chancellor and have faith in the private sector! If you enjoyed this article subscribe to our daily tea-time newsletter here, share and follow us on Twitter here – and like and comment on facebook here.      Tim Pope FCA is a retired Risk Management Partner of PwC LLP UK.
xxxxxy
26/11/2020
18:33
mm2 "Bought and sold Min, £8563 profit. Suck that up" Why don't you do it again if it is that good? This time report your size of trade + purchase price - when you purchase. ;)
minerve 2
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