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Name Symbol Market Type
Raven Prop P LSE:RAVP London Preference Share
  Price Change % Change Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 123.00 120.00 126.00 123.00 121.50 121.50 29,357 08:01:53

Raven Prop P Discussion Threads

Showing 926 to 948 of 950 messages
Chat Pages: 38  37  36  35  34  33  32  31  30  29  28  27  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
25/9/2020
13:03
It is slightly cheaper than you buy ravp but it is not enough to make money for arbitrage. You pay 89.9 p for ravc which works out as paying ravp for (89.9-0.6108*31)/0.5849 = 121.33 p. While buuying ravp directly you pay about 125 p.
riskvsreward
25/9/2020
12:56
People talk about buying RAVC as a cheap way into RAVP but the trading volume in RAVC indicates no one is doing it.
kenny
25/9/2020
10:57
Only if you can buy near the bid price.
gfrae
25/9/2020
09:18
Buy the ravc and you will get flipped into these at a 5pct discount which will more than cover the spread
catsick
24/9/2020
23:51
"The Basket Cases of Inflation and Deflation" hTTps://deflation.com/en/Articles/The-Basket-Cases-of-Inflation-and-Deflation--The-Fed-dealing-with-an-increasingly-sticky-wicket Quote from the above article: "Meanwhile, in other news, Wells Fargo is reporting reduced demand for loans from customers. Now that’s proper deflation: debt deflation."
kenny
24/9/2020
14:19
Gary, I agree with you, the spread needs to be narrowed.
kenny
24/9/2020
14:07
Been looking to buy in again here,but with the ridiculous spread,and the same or better yield can be purchased in IMB,LGEN,and SLA atm,with much less risk..
garycook
24/9/2020
11:46
Warren Buffet a very well respected professional investor I think all would agree recently started buying into Barrick Gold. This was a man who does not believe gold is place to put money, quote below as obviously a point is not valid here without a quote from a professional investor. So what does he know? “You could take all the gold that’s ever been mined, and it would fill a cube 67 feet in each direction. For what it’s worth at current gold prices, you could buy — not some — all of the farmland in the United States. Plus, you could buy 10 Exxon Mobils (XOM), plus have $1 trillion of walking-around money. Or you could have a big cube of metal. Which would you take? Which is going to produce more value?”
pogue
24/9/2020
11:31
Quite correct pogue. As to bonds, well China are selling. Professional investors ie the institutions HAVE to buy - someones gotta buy em aint they!
cfro
24/9/2020
10:39
"Professional investors are buying bonds. Should you be as well?" hTTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/bonds/professional-investors-buying-bonds-should/#comment Worth a read, for anyone who can access The Telegraph.
kenny
24/9/2020
08:32
The point you miss in your rush to quote people is that if you think logically about this if you have deflation the debts of the Western World will bring down the whole system as the government's are spending money like water now they have no hope of ever paying back so eventually, or rather sooner with the current problems, the whole system collapses. I dont rate the chances of anything surviving that crash, apart from gold and tins of beans. If central banks fail to create inflation there is no way to get rid of the debts so everyone is bankrupt. So the logical thing is to bet on inflation you cant win with deflation its just delaying the inevitable. Keep reading vested interests and avoid looking at the big picture Kenny if it keeps you happy.
pogue
24/9/2020
00:54
Quite liked these comments about inflation: Jeffrey Cleveland, senior economist at Payden & Rygel (22 September 2020) First the world shut down due to the coronavirus. Then heatwaves swept the globe. Hurricanes have slammed into coastal cities. Wildfires are burning across the Western US. All the while, elections and another wave of the virus loom. To be specific, it is low inflation that draws the ire of central bankers who desperately want to engineer more of it - for our own good, they assure us. At the Bank of England, Governor Andrew Bailey pledged to "not hesitate to take all necessary actions" that "ensure inflation is consistent with the 2% target in the medium term." US Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell called low inflation "one of our time's major challenges." Really? We think low inflation worriers miss the mark wildly on two counts. Embracing the lows Firstly, we should welcome low inflation, not fear it. Whenever you hear a central banker talk about the need for inflation, check your pocketbook (or bank balance). For consumers, replace the word "inflation" with the phrase "an annual reduction in my purchasing power" whenever you hear it. Take the Fed. As part of the central bank's self-imposed rethink of its monetary policy framework, it spent a year and a half "listening" to the public at town hall-style events. While we applaud efforts by central banks to mingle with the masses, we doubt too many Americans were storming the venues pleading for higher prices. For consumers - many of whom are already struggling with rents, mortgage payments, health, and education bills amid high unemployment - the last thing they want is an inflation-induced reduction in their purchasing power. Inflation is no friend to investors, either. The best years for asset price performance correspond with low inflation, not high inflation. According to Deutsche Bank, from 1972 to 1979, inflation in the US averaged around 8% per annum, and real (inflation-adjusted) returns on equity and bonds averaged -2.9% and -3.9%, respectively. In the UK, the same period also saw high inflation and similarly lacklustre real equity and bond returns of -5.5% and -6.1%, respectively. Before and after the 1970s, inflation was low to moderate, and both equities and bonds exhibited positive performance. In fact, in the "low inflation" period between 1980 and today, we have seen real annual returns of about 7%-8% in US and UK equities and 5% in US and UK bonds. Not a bad time for investors. The 'FAIT' accompli Secondly, what makes central bankers think they can alter the low inflation trend? As mentioned above, after a much-ballyhooed year and a half rethink, the Fed announced it would transition to a flexible average inflation targeting strategy. A mouthful, to be sure, so Fed board member Lael Brainar advised: "We call it FAIT." The gist of this is that the Fed pledges not to flinch should inflation top 2%, allowing for average inflation to "catch up" after periods of low inflation. We say all well and good, but US inflation has trailed 2% since the Fed officially emblazoned the target in a statement in 2012, and the level of prices is now a full five percentage points below where it would have ended up had the central bank's aim been accurate. Neither verbal nor written announcements appear to have much effect on prices. Now, you might be thinking 'Wait, central banks are doing way more than just talking about higher inflation this time around'. They have been conducting asset purchases on a scale unseen in economic history. Meanwhile, their fiscal counterparts are on borrowing binges. Suffice to say asset purchases have been a staple of global central bank policy for more than a decade now, with vanishingly little to show for it when it comes to inflation. And the fiscal borrowing spree? New debt issuance is not in and of itself inflationary. More debt only means the government has offset the hole in consumer incomes due to the pandemic shutdowns. If Japan's experience provides any lessons, it is that a high debt-to-GDP ratio fails to stoke inflation. Further, a simple disaggregation of the most popular inflation index, personal consumption expenditures, portrays the issue (see graph above). At your service? Not yet What has been holding prices down? Not service prices. While the cost of services - think everything from haircuts to healthcare - has been rising at a steady, 3% clip, durable goods prices have been deflating for two decades, depressing the overall rate of inflation. Again, better goods at lower prices hardly seem like the economic calamity central bankers urgently need to confront. In short, while a central bank's goal to boost inflation to a 2% average over time might seem somewhat misguided, we are sceptical they will be able to manufacture the inflation they so desperately desire - no need to lose sleep over it just yet. As such, for investors, calls of "the end of the bond bull market" may once again prove premature.
kenny
23/9/2020
11:32
To Kenny or anyone holding RAVP,what is bid/selling price atm.I know the offer/buying price is 125.45p ?
garycook
21/9/2020
09:09
Massive drop... somewhat less than the rest of the market! Safe as dachas.
igbertsponk
18/9/2020
15:57
2nd Oct dividend cheque on the doormat, nice.
montyhedge
18/9/2020
01:36
According to Thursday's MPC meeting the BoE is looking in to negative interest rates for the UK. Some commentary below about Thursday's revelation: ============================================================================= Financial markets - already pricing a move into negative territory by the MPC as economic prospects darken - are forecasting a cut to minus 0.1pc by mid-2021. JP Morgan economist Allan Monks said: "The BoE is serious about negative rates. The more it talks about this option the more it looks as if it has all but made up its mind." ============================================================================= Also this week the Fed stated that interest rates will likely be "anchored near zero" until at least 2024. I think very low interest rates may stay for a long time beyond 2024. I also think a bout of deflation could develop.
kenny
17/9/2020
04:25
Kenny & eeza, Thanks
garycook
16/9/2020
15:05
Hi Gary, the next ex-div is the 12th Nov.
kenny
16/9/2020
14:33
@Garycook XD is always a Thursday (except for a few overseas tickers). So will be either 12th or 19th Nov.
eeza
16/9/2020
14:22
They said Our market is stabilising but we think it prudent that in relation to 2020 we will announce one distribution at the time of the issue of our annual results. I didn't see anything about years after 2020, or about the level of future distributions, but I suppose Edison need to make assumptions in order to write their note.
zangdook
16/9/2020
14:20
Kenny,Next XD date for RAVP would be around or on Friday 13 November correct ?
garycook
16/9/2020
13:57
zandook, just to clarify: You are correct but in the recent results the company stated that they will now change to one buy-back per annum on the ordinary. Subsequently, Edison projections show a reduced dividend of 2.25p per annum for each year they forecast. Therefore, David Stevenson is correct. In any event the actual yield on the ordinaries is very low - for the reason that the yield the company and others quote, does not take account of the fact the majority of the "dividend" on the ordinaries represents a return of capital. Hence, I have always preferred RAVP.
kenny
16/9/2020
12:19
I think he's mistaken about the ords yield, which undermines his preference for the prefs: and the shares are yielding 7.6% at 30p RAV usually does two tenders a year, but he's only counting the 2.25p/share from the upcoming tender.
zangdook
Chat Pages: 38  37  36  35  34  33  32  31  30  29  28  27  Older
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