Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Plus500 LSE:PLUS London Ordinary Share IL0011284465 ORD ILS0.01 (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +6.00p +0.33% 1,836.00p 1,832.00p 1,836.00p 1,841.00p 1,804.00p 1,827.00p 106,370 10:34:17
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Software & Computer Services 323.7 187.6 129.6 13.4 2,103.04

Plus500 Share Discussion Threads

Showing 13876 to 13900 of 13900 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
21/8/2018
09:57
That advice may be right for you and your investment structure, getting, but maybe not for others. And, tbh, you are one of only a few to question this issue. You might equally ask why I have an Irish share in my ISA where I lose 20%? The answer is that DCC is a defensive share, one of three amongst itself, BNZL and RB. that I hold and, even if I lose 20% the overall (on a <2% yield) the gain in portfolio performance outweighs my tax loss. PLUS500 is altogether different, as a high yield, "growth" stock, and I made a conscious decision not to hold it in an ISA. Different strokes for different folks?
sogoesit
21/8/2018
09:41
. Sorry, error in my previous post.
chucko1
21/8/2018
09:37
Re tax - also need to consider CGT avoidance in an ISA which given progress from 400 - 1850 over the past 18 months is likely to far outweigh any divi tax considerations if you have utilised your CGT annual allowance.
sailing john
21/8/2018
09:34
Sogoesit, I'm not doubting you, but there are a lot of people on here who clearly think that you can't get the 15% back, but if you're correct then the answer is quite simple - don't buy the shares into an ISA! I don't think anyone else has made that point before. If that is right then it's a lot simpler than constantly selling and re-buying. It also brings into question the point of getting the reduction from 25% to 15% if all the 25% can be offset on a tax return doesn't it?
gettingrichslow
21/8/2018
09:21
Here's an article corroborating my case but about US shares where there is a 30% withholding tax on income for foreigners arising from US dividends, reduced by submitting a W-8BEN form to one's US Withholding Agent using the double tax treaty allowances to reduce it to 15%. The 15% on US dividend income is lost in an ISA however. htTps://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/markets/11428222/Sting-in-the-tail-of-foreign-shares-that-means-you-could-be-taxed-twice.html
sogoesit
21/8/2018
09:14
Yes, getting. As I demonstrated with my DCC (Irish) dividends in a previous post. (Post 13782).
sogoesit
21/8/2018
08:55
Sogoesit, so are you saying you are worse off if your PLUS shares are in an ISA than if they were held outside an ISA, because you can't recover the 15% if they are ISA'd?
gettingrichslow
21/8/2018
08:12
Sure, you "recover" it through your UK tax return... if you pay income tax. Overseas tax on dividends is an allowable deductible. But not in ISAs as they are ring-fenced. As discussed before, it's a tax arbitrage. All depends on price risk, tax gains or losses and each individual's tax position.
sogoesit
21/8/2018
07:51
Chucko, so is it your belief that the best one can do is reduce the Israeli tax to 15%? (There has been some suggestions in past that one can recover that 15% through a UK tax return??) Secondly, if the answer to first question is 'yes, the best you can do is lose 15% of the dividend', are you really saying that you see that as a better way of proceeding than selling out and re-buying?
gettingrichslow
21/8/2018
07:33
Https://www.moneyobserver.com/how-to-invest/understanding-tax-dividends
metis20
20/8/2018
23:02
There is, though - you just don’t see it. If a UK company pays a dividend of 1.11p, then you see 1p of it and HMRC sees 0.11p of it. It’s just taxed at the company level, whereas in the past, you would have seen the entire 1.11p with nothing withheld. The company states a dividend of 1.00p - that’s why you don’t see it. Tax-wise, you, the tax payer, are assumed to have already had 10% withheld, which in no circumstances can be reclaimed (even in ISAs or SIPPs). That’s why tax rates on dividends are less than those advertised - as you’ve already been taxed that 10%
chucko1
20/8/2018
22:11
You have guessed correctly! - Https://www.dlapiperintelligence.com/goingglobal/tax/index.html?t=17-withholding-tax "There are no withholding taxes on dividends paid by a UK company to any shareholder."
metis20
20/8/2018
22:00
Metis, thanks for your response, I appreciate it, but isn't the whole point of double taxation treaties that they are reciprocal arrangements that mean no-one is worse off on either side? Do Israeli investors in British companies suffer the same punitive arrangement? I'm not sure but I'm guessing not?
gettingrichslow
20/8/2018
19:54
As I understand it the withholding tax is a tax paid to the Israeli gov. For a shareholding which is less than 10% of the company this is 25% of the dividend for someone living outside Israel. However, if there is a treaty between Israel and the country of residence of the shareholder then the withholding tax is less. In the case of the UK it is 10% less. The key point is that it is a tax paid to the Israeli gov. and not a tax paid to the UK gov. If it had been the latter, then the tax would of course be waived if the shares are held in an ISA. Here is the detail - "As set out in the Group's Admission Document, with respect to dividends sourced from regular earnings, under the Israeli Tax Ordinance and regulations ("ITO"), the current Israeli rate of withholding tax on dividends paid by an Israeli company is 30% for distributions to a "substantial shareholder" (in general, being someone who holds, directly or indirectly, by himself or together with others, at least 10% of one or more of the means of control in the company) and 25% with respect to distributions to all other holders of Ordinary Shares ("Withholding Tax"). "In order for a holder of depositary interests in respect of ordinary shares ("DI holder"), which is not an Israeli tax resident, to benefit from a reduced withholding tax rate under a tax treaty between Israel and the country of his/her residence, such as the UK, a shareholder must apply to the Israel Tax Authority (the "ITA") and obtain from the ITA a certificate for a reduced withholding tax rate as set in the applicable tax treaty (the "Certificate"). In general, under the Double Taxation Treaty between Israel and the UK (the "UK Treaty"), a DI holder who is a British tax resident who holds less than 10% of the rights of the company and such dividend income is subject to tax in the UK and should be entitled to benefit from the UK Treaty, is entitled to a reduced withholding tax rate of 15% (the "Reduced Withholding Tax Rate"), provided the DI holder submits a duly issued Certificate prior to the payment date." Above from Https://www.investegate.co.uk/plus500-ltd--plus-/rns/withholding-tax-on-dividends/201703090700099301Y/
metis20
20/8/2018
18:31
Does anyone understand why the 15% tax that remains after the ESOP process is not reclaimable when the investment is in an ISA? Isn't that the whole point of an ISA??
gettingrichslow
20/8/2018
18:26
Isnt ESMA built into the price and given volatility will be elevated come the mid term elections based on history and PLUS normal overly cautious guidance,entering FTSE 250 it could bounce rapidly
poolefox
20/8/2018
18:06
That's true whereas last go round the growth was in full flight. That being said I like the Far East prospects and Aussie traction too. Impossible to predict bar the volatility!
noujay
20/8/2018
17:54
Noujay,the only difference this time is that ESMA is starting to bite deeply into profits and is dramatically slowing down new customer recruitment.How bad the impact will be will not be known until the third quarter results are out.The share price could be quite volatile in the intervening period. I have erred on the side of caution and sold all my holding today.May buy back after the 3Q results.
nurdin
20/8/2018
17:09
Does anyone know if SEP spread bets on PLUS exist. If so, who is offering them?
chucko1
20/8/2018
17:00
That is the other consideration, half and half. Alternatively you could just buy a fresh tranche on the drop to match the original holding (if within reason), then if it pops back to parity you've buttered your bread on both sides.Of course it can go both ways, but that is what I intend to do although I won't be buying as much as the original holding.The withholding tax is a pain I agree, but it's still a great interim dividend and this time around it doesn't take so long to get paid!
noujay
20/8/2018
16:56
Isn't there also the advantage of having the dividend in dollars so benefiting from the fall in value of the pound at the moment? Doesn't that go some way to offsetting the withholding tax?
daijavu
20/8/2018
16:38
We all have the same dilemma. It would be nice to avoid the 25% withholding but my fear is that on the next day, by the time I manage to get a quote to re-buy my full holding, the price will have already gone up a fair bit with other people doing exactly as I am. I also held through the last ex-dividend date and it worked out pretty well and with long term confidence in PLUS, I'm sure none of us will look back on this as being a key investment decision. If in doubt one option could be to sell and re-buy half your holding as a bit of a hedge.
foolishben
20/8/2018
16:30
I also have the same dilemma. I also held in Feb and collected dividend. I just prefer to avoid the 25% that is withheld from full divi payment. I will watch tomorrow and Wednesday before making final decision. Long term I want to be holding so if I do jump out before ex-div I will be back in from 23rd at best price
andrewclarke99
20/8/2018
16:18
I can't work out the best strategy for it re dividend record date and so given I expect it to fly up into the mid 20's soon sitting tight and collecting the dividend as well seems the best bet. I did so in February and it worked out well within five sessions, so may as well hope for a repeat! GLA
noujay
20/8/2018
14:44
There may be another factor in unpredictable movement in price over ex div date. Although logic suggests some selling by individual investors wishing to convert income into gain, I have known chunky buying by some income funds, just ahead of ex date, to collect income, followed by sale thereafter.
stuffee
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