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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Barclays LSE:BARC London Ordinary Share GB0031348658 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +1.65p +0.79% 211.35p 211.30p 211.40p 212.75p 208.40p 209.70p 18,607,470 15:25:38
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 21,451.0 3,230.0 10.4 20.3 35,985.53

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Date Time Title Posts
26/7/201713:55ACTIVE BARCLAYS TRADERS CLUB122,720
24/6/201709:36911- THE BIGGEST TV LIE IN HISTORY...THE AIR LINERS WERE FAKED!22
23/6/201722:16THE BANKERS ARE THE WANKERS SOCIETY16
08/3/201716:45testing14
23/2/201715:02Time to Look at Barclays (BARC)1

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14:25:38211.353,4607,312.71AT
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14:25:34211.401,8253,858.05NT
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DateSubject
26/7/2017
09:20
Barclays Daily Update: Barclays is listed in the Banks sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BARC. The last closing price for Barclays was 209.70p.
Barclays has a 4 week average price of 200.90p and a 12 week average price of 194.40p.
The 1 year high share price is 244.40p while the 1 year low share price is currently 145.25p.
There are currently 17,026,511,810 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 34,071,249 shares. The market capitalisation of Barclays is £36,011,072,478.15.
05/6/2017
20:45
diku: Didn't Mac the knife say Barc share price to double when it was trading around 240p?...was it 2 or 3 years ago...
06/4/2017
16:39
bernie37: Hello Share Trundlers. The real reason why Barclay’s (BARC) share price fell so sharply on its results is that the dividend was cut by more than a half. This whammy was compounded by the company’s forecast that this state of affairs would continue for a year or two. All those institutions which rely on dividends to pay pensions and other incomes are very tempted to switch into companies which are maintaining present dividend levels and hopefully improving upon them. However lots of companies are cutting yields these days and so swapping out of Barclays is not always going to solve all pension problems. For those of us who chose shares because they hope the stock price will improve, Barclays could now be a decent punt. The divi issue is very likely to have put the shares into the over-sold category. And oversold shares tend to rally fairly quickly. I hold some Barclay shares and will not be in a hurry to sell them. Maybe I’ll buy some more in a week or so. Fortunately for me I sold most of my Barclays stock a year ago when I bought a new house. So my loss this week is small. All bank share prices came down on Barclays results, but only for an hour or two. We must remember that the company did make a profit. In recent years, some banks have even failed to do that. Barclays shares fell 11% after reporting a drop in full-year profits, a dividend cut and a restructuring including reducing its stake in Africa. Underlying annual profits for 2015 fell by 2% to £5.4 billion. That doesn’t seem very much does it, chums?. Not in these terrible days for many businesses. Barclays also announced a further £1.45bn provision for PPI mis-selling. Whether that provision will be fully drawn upon is doubtful, in my humble opinion. The bank plans to restructure with two main divisions - Barclays UK and Barclays Corporate & International. The company, which has its origins in Africa, also aims to slim down drastically its African operation. This will bring it more into line with the Lloyds policy of concentrating on the UK. The share price may be down 11%, as I write. But what i’ve already mentioned in this article does not make me think that kind of fall is at all justified. And I expect a pretty energetic bounce to follow. I’m now going to make a recovery of a different kind with a pint in the Punter’s Return. - See more at: hxxp://www.shareprophets.com/views/19117/dividend-slashed-but-i-m-banking-on-barclays-share-price-to-bounce-back#sthash.OQyiKoAN.dpuf
29/3/2017
15:56
bernie37: broker ratings Barclays PLC 15% Potential Upside Indicated by Credit Suisse Posted by: Amilia Stone 28th March 2017 Barclays PLC using EPIC/TICKER code LON:BARC has had its stock rating noted as ‘Reiterates217; with the recommendation being set at ‘OUTPERFORM217; this morning by analysts at Credit Suisse. Barclays PLC are listed in the Financials sector within UK Main Market. Credit Suisse have set their target price at 260 GBX on its stock. This indicates the analyst now believes there is a potential upside of 15% from the opening price of 226.15 GBX. Over the last 30 and 90 trading days the company share price has increased 1.15 points and increased 0.65 points respectively. Barclays PLC LON:BARC has a 50 day moving average of 232.36 GBX and a 200 day moving average of 197.11 GBX. The 1 year high for the stock price is 267.32 GBX while the 52 week low for the share price is 121.1 GBX. There are currently 16,907,355,556 shares in issue with the average daily volume traded being 49,626,700. Market capitalisation for LON:BARC is £38,056,090,079 GBP. Barclays PLC is a global financial services holding company. The Company is engaged in retail banking, credit cards, wholesale banking, investment banking, wealth management and investment management services. The Company’s segments include Barclays UK and Barclays International. The Barclays UK segment includes the local consumer, small business, the United Kingdom wealth and credit cards business. You might also find these articles of interest: Register here to be notified of future articles like this Get all our broker ratings on Twitter as they are published!
24/2/2017
16:27
bernie37: Barclays PLC and Barclays Africa agree separation terms Thursday, 23 February 2017 Barclays Africa Group today announced that it has agreed terms for operational separation with UK-based Barclays PLC, which is reducing its shareholding in Barclays Africa. The agreement is expected to unlock opportunities for Barclays Africa as an independent pan African bank. UK-based Barclays PLC announced last March that it intends to sell the majority of its shareholding in Barclays Africa over a period of two to three years. Barclays PLC currently owns 50.1% of Barclays Africa. Following the reduction of Barclays PLC’s shareholding below the 50% mark, Barclays Africa will be able to continue using the Barclays brand at its operations outside of South Africa for three years. Barclays Africa will receive certain services from Barclays PLC on arms’ length basis for a transitional period, typically up to three years. “It is a good outcome that enables us to complete the separation, and to provide continuity and improved service for our customers,” holds Maria Ramos, chief executive, Barclays Africa. An important feature of discussions has been the provision for a broad-based black economic empowerment scheme. While the full details are still under consideration, we are pleased to announce that Barclays PLC has agreed to contribute an amount equivalent to 1.5% of Barclays Africa’s market capitalisation, or R2.1 billion (based on a Barclays Africa’s share price of R168.69 on 31 December 2016) towards the establishment of such a scheme. “Separation has a number of implications for our business,” said Ramos. “It gives us the opportunity to unlock the potential to do things differently and build energy and momentum for our future as a pan-African organisation.” Alongside a black economic empowerment scheme, Barclays Africa also wants to create an equity proposition for our staff in the next 12 to 18 months. This will give our people the opportunity to benefit from share ownership, and to share in the future growth of our business. Barclays PLC has submitted an application to the South African Reserve Bank for approval to reduce its shareholding in Barclays Africa Group to below 50%. The application, which also requires the approval of the Minister of Finance, includes the terms of the separation payments and transitional services arrangements, which have been agreed between Barclays PLC and Barclays Africa. The agreement provides for contributions by Barclays PLC totalling GBP765 million (R12.8 billion based on 31 Dec 2016 exchange rate) primarily to fund the investments required for Barclays Africa Group to separate from Barclays PLC as follows: £515m for investments required in technology, rebranding and other separation projects; £55m to cover separation related expenses, of which £27.5m was received in December 2016; and £195m to terminate the existing service level agreement between Barclays and BAGL, relating to the Rest of Africa operations acquired in 2013. The expectation is that the financial contributions will neutralise the capital and cash flow impact of separation investments on the Group over time.
23/2/2017
22:07
diku: Dr Bio....insiders own the company...wider shareholders are just a side kick... somebody remind Mack the knife or Jack the knife whatever his name is....didn't he say Barc share price was going to double?...when?...what they say & what it means is all very vague...but are shareholders soooooooooooo gullible...
17/2/2017
16:09
bernie37: That’s the view on banks by Schroder Income fund’s co-manager, Kevin Murphy. But how accurate an assertion is that, given the much maligned recent history of the sector? Murphy was speaking after adding Standard Chartered to his portfolio, which already includes Barclays, HSBC, Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and Lloyds Banking Group. It would also appear that TD Direct Investing customers are seeking more exposure to banks; our latest data shows an increase in trades in banking stocks of 29% during 2016. So, ahead of next week’s earnings calendar, which will be dominated by the largest UK retail banks Lloyds, Barclays, RBS and HSBC, we wanted to assess whether the banking sector is returning to former glories. Bringing back dividends Before the financial crisis of 2008 UK banks were among the best places to invest for solid dividend growth. 10 years ago, banks provided almost a quarter of all dividends in the UK market. Following the financial crisis, banks went through the wringer; not only did their share prices plummet, but many were forced to suspend dividend payments too, most notably Lloyds and RBS. Since then UK banks have been rebuilding their balance sheets and are now returning to form. The health of these businesses is reflected in their dividends, with HSBC, Lloyds and Barclays now paying a good level of dividend yield. In 2015, Lloyds announced its first dividend since the government stepped in to bail it out in 2008. Standard Chartered, meanwhile, is likely to be among those companies which recommence dividend distributions this year. Bank/Index Dividend Yield % 1 Year Share Price Return,% 2 Year Share Price Return,% 3 Year Share Price Return,% 4 Year Share Price Return,% 5 Year Share Price Return,% Major banks HSBC Holdings 5.3 48.4 48.4 29.5 20.0 70.6 Lloyds Banking Group 3.5 3.6 -6.2 -17.0% 33.9 125.8 Barclays 0.8 21.4 -1.0 -12.6 -12.3 28.0 Royal Bank of Scotland -12.2 -38.8 -34.8 -35.4 -16.7 Standard Chartered 64.4 -4.1 -28.5 -45.3 -38.0 Challenger Banks Virgin Money Holdings 1.4 -0.1 1.3 Aldermore Group 1.2 Shawbrook Group -16.6 FTSE All Share Banks Index 3.7 20.1 14.5 22.6 35.0 57.0 FTSE All Share Index 3.7 32.0 9.2 3.0 1.0 39.9 Source: Morningstar Direct. As at 31 January 2017. Note Metro Bank and Clydesdale Bank have been listed on the LSE for less than a year. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future returns. Note that current yield may not reflect historical yields. Over the last year (to the end of January 2017) the share prices of all these banks, bar RBS, have risen, with HSBC, Barclays and Standard Chartered showing double digit growth. Lloyds’ share price, though, has come under pressure from the government selling down its stake, while RBS was hit by failing the Bank of England’s stress tests and mis-selling fines. According to Capita’s UK Dividend Monitor report in January 2017, £10.4bn was paid out in dividends by the banks in 2016, mainly HSBC. HSBC, the UK’s second largest payer, distributed £7.5bn, up 17% year-on-year, thanks in no small part to weaker sterling. Special dividends were also part of the story. Strong profit growth at Lloyds prompted a special dividend of £360m. HSBC has been in the top three dividend payers in the FTSE All Share index every year since 2008. An attractive long-term investment opportunity While ratings agency Fitch raised concerns about the banking sector in the immediate aftermath of the decision to leave the European Union last June, banks’ strong balance sheets should allow them to cope with moderate negative shocks going forward. Banks remain an attractive investment opportunity in the long term. They will be beneficiaries when interest rates rise from their historic lows. While the timescale for rate rises remains uncertain, an upwards trajectory seems the most likely outcome which will allow banks to increase their margins. Their profitability will also be boosted by increasing inflation. In addition banks continue to focus on cost cutting to deal with economic and structural challenges. UK fund managers believe banks are back on track, and some have been adding to their positions in anticipation of higher dividends in the future. Alistair Mundy, manager of Investec UK Special Situations has been a long standing holder of UK banks including HSBC, Lloyds, Barclays and RBS. The fund currently has approximately a 25% allocation to the sector. Being a contrarian investor, Mundy was attracted to banking stocks at a time when they were deeply out of favour. “In 2007 everyone loved RBS. They said it would keep growing and making acquisitions and that it was run by a genius. It turned out to be run by a lunatic rather than a genius, and it didn’t continue to grow.” He continues: “People say there are regulatory problems, but even the Bank of England has said we are at peak regulation. The fines and litigation will go away. People are also talking about the challenger banks, although many people are too lazy to change banks so the large banks will continue to make money from them. UK banks are priced like its 2008.” He believes, however, that the sector as a whole is now in much better shape, and this is yet to be fully appreciated by markets. Other funds on our Recommended Funds list with a significant allocation to banks include Schroder Income, Majedie UK Equity, JOHCM UK Dynamic and Old Mutual UK Alpha. Don’t forget about the challenger banks Despite Mundy’s lack of concern, a number of challenger banks, which are making use of leading edge technology, could be positioned to disrupt the banking sector. Research broker Liberum highlights challenger banks will continue to deliver growth and earnings, and could be poised to threaten the status quo. TD Direct Investing customers have also picked up on the challenger bank story, with trades skyrocketing by 188% over the course of last year. If you’re keen to get exposure to UK banks take a look at each of the funds below. Or you could visit our stocks and shares page to find all the UK banks. -
18/1/2017
20:30
bernie37: Hurdles slow Barclays sale of Africa division Pretoria News1 Dec 2016Renee Bonorchis BARCLAYS sold the first slice of its controlling stake in Barclays Africa Group just two months after chief executive Jes Staley laid out his strategy to boost capital. Here is why the bank’s next move has taken much longer and some key issues the 365-year-old lender must overcome to speed up its two- to three-year time frame for the sell down: How difficult is it to sell the stake? Project teams are working late nights at Barclays Africa to make sure every detail is taken into account, according to the Johannesburg-based lender. The SA Reserve Bank must ensure Barclays’ withdrawal doesn’t endanger stability across the continent, put the rand at risk or upset transactions for Barclays Africa’s 12.5 million customers. Also at stake is the future of 41 250 employees at the company formerly known as Absa Group, more than 70 percent of whom are in South Africa. What’s happening inside the banks? The banks are negotiating a transitional services agreement to deconsolidate Barclays Africa, according to Staley. They are also figuring out how to change reporting lines within teams; maintain global distribution for investment banking clients; which customers should get transferred to different units; how many staff are needed and where; how to change Barclays-linked e-mail addresses; how to deal with software licences; and who will do dollar-based trading for clients across Africa. What has the uncertainty done to Barclays Africa? Barclays Africa is the worst-performing lender on the six-member FTSE/JSE Africa banks index this year, having gained 12 percent compared with the average increase of 24 percent, with investors concerned about shares that still have to be sold on the market. The stock is trading at a 12-month dividend yield of 6.3 percent, the highest in the index. What happens to Barclays Africa’s name? After more than 100 years in Africa, there is a real chance that the name Barclays may disappear from the continent. “Decisions on brand are being carefully considered and will be implemented over time once they have been taken,” Barclays Africa said in an e-mailed response to questions. Absa kept its branding and red colours even after the purchase by Barclays in 2005, while the turquoise colours of Barclays was retained in the other African units. What do Barclays’ holdings look like now? The UK bank owns 50.1 percent of the South African lender, a stake which is valued at about R68 billion. It sold about 12 percent through an accelerated book build in May for R13.1bn, where demand exceeded supply. Who might be interested in a stake in Barclays Africa? Dubai-based Abraaj Group and US private equity firm Carlyle Group were initially interested in a stake along with Bob Diamond’s Atlas Merchant Capital, but withdrew after regulators made it clear it didn’t want Barclays Africa in the hands of buyout companies. While South Africa’s Public Investment Corporation is interested in boosting its 6.5 percent holding, it has said it hasn’t yet been able to form a consortium with enough money, and may take up more shares in another book build. When might another book build take place? Barclays hadn’t yet applied to the Reserve Bank to take its stake below 50.1 percent, the central bank said in an e-mailed response to questions. Instead, it’s working with the regulator along with Barclays Africa to ensure the process is smooth once the transaction is ready. The London-based parent, which would need to make separation payments, was working well with Barclays Africa management and was under no pressure to get the transaction done earlier, chief financial officer Tushar Morzaria said. The parent would want to get a sale done as soon as possible following a 47 percent rally this year in pound terms in Barclays Africa’s share price, said Harry Botha, an analyst at Avior Capital Markets. How is the SA Reserve Bank ensuring stability? By asking a lot of questions. From technology systems, to the working of ATMs and the company’s strategies to lessen panic if customers react negatively to changes, the lender and the central bank are planning for every scenario. The Pretoria-based central bank is also playing the role of lead regulator for all the African countries involved. What are the regulations? Under the present rules, no investor can buy more than 15 percent of a South African bank without permission from the Reserve Bank. The purchase of a controlling stake needs approval from the finance minister, who will work with the regulator. There is no process in the law for a transaction of this nature, according to Adrian Cloete, an analyst at PSG Wealth in Cape Town. “A regulatory deconsolidation is very complex.” – Bloomberg
16/6/2016
12:09
supermarky: The great British people will decide at the referendum. Does anyone have any comments about the barc share price in the short term?
15/3/2016
14:27
portside1: The market price on the date the Shares were provided was GBP1.6535 per Share and the place of trading was the London Stock Exchange. Director/ Shares Shares Balance PDMR provided deducted of Shares to Director/ to cover held by PDMR tax liabilities Director ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Jes Staley 1,090,169 512,380 3,390,786 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tushar Morzaria 643,494 302,444 1,272,360 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Michael Harte 287,242 135,005 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Bob Hoyt 483,562 227,277 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Robert Le Blanc 779,790 366,505 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tristram Roberts 336,537 158,174 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Mike Roemer 211,989 99,638 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Amer Sajed 241,023 84,844 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Ashok Vaswani 1,085,037 509,972 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Notes: 1 The Share element of role based pay is payable quarterly and is subject to a holding period with restrictions lifting over five years (20% each year). 2 Tax liabilities on the Shares provided were met in cash and the number of Shares actually received by each individual was reduced by the value required to meet those liabilities. 3 The SVP was introduced in March 2010. SVP awards are granted to participants over Shares which may typically be released over a period of three years in equal annual tranches dependent on future service and the SVP rules. Discretionary dividend equivalent payments may also be made to participants on release of a SVP award. Since 2014, the Shares awarded to Directors and PDMRs have been subject to a six month holding period after release. SVP awards are also made to eligible employees for recruitment purposes under schedule 1 to the SVP (JSVP). 4 For further details on the Barclays LTIP, see previous disclosures in the Barclays Annual Report. -ENDS- For further information please contact: Investor Relations Media Relations Kathryn McLeland Tom Hoskin +44 (0)207 116 4943 +44 (0)20 7116 0699 This information is provided by RNS The company news service from the London Stock Exchange END RDSGGUACWUPQGPA (END) Dow Jones Newswires March 15, 2016 09:30 ET (13:30 GMT) 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart Barclays Share News (BARC) Follow BARC Start Trading Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description Barclays LSE:BARC London Ordinary Share GB0031348658 ORD 25P Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade +0.55p +0.34% 163.80p 163.75p 163.85p 164.40p 161.35p 162.20p 18,571,377 14:10:15 Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m) Banks 25,987.0 2,073.0 -1.9 - 27,519.81 Print Alert Barclays PLC Director/PDMR Shareholding 15/03/2016 1:30pm UK Regulatory (RNS & others) Barclays (LSE:BARC) Intraday Stock Chart Today : Tuesday 15 March 2016 Click Here for more Barclays Charts. TIDMBARC RNS Number : 1629S Barclays PLC 15 March 2016 15 March 2016 Barclays PLC (the "Company") Director/PDMR Shareholding: Disclosure and Transparency Rules 3.1.4R (1)(a) Pursuant to the Financial Conduct Authority's Disclosure and Transparency Rule 3.1.4R, the Company announces that the trustee of the Barclays Group (PSP) Employees' Benefit Trust notified the Company on 14 March 2016 that on 14 March 2016 it had delivered ordinary shares of Barclays PLC with a nominal value of 25p each (the "Shares") to the Directors and Persons Discharging Managerial Responsibilities ("PDMR") of the Company as set out in the table below. The Shares delivered are: i. in respect of the quarterly payment of the Share element of the role based pay component(1) of PDMRs' fixed remuneration for the three months to 31 March 2016; ii. in respect of Share Incentive (Holding Period) Awards made in 2016 (the remaining Shares, after tax liabilities(2) were discharged, are now held in a nominee account on behalf of the individuals); and iii. to satisfy the release of Shares the subject of awards made under the Barclays Share Value Plan(3) (the "SVP") and the Barclays Long Term Incentive Plan(4) (the "LTIP") over the last three years. The market price on the date the Shares were provided was GBP1.6535 per Share and the place of trading was the London Stock Exchange. Director/ Shares Shares Balance PDMR provided deducted of Shares to Director/ to cover held by PDMR tax liabilities Director ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Jes Staley 1,090,169 512,380 3,390,786 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tushar Morzaria 643,494 302,444 1,272,360 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Michael Harte 287,242 135,005 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Bob Hoyt 483,562 227,277 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Robert Le Blanc 779,790 366,505 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tristram Roberts 336,537 158,174 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Mike Roemer 211,989 99,638 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Amer Sajed 241,023 84,844 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Ashok Vaswani 1,085,037 509,972 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Notes: 1 The Share element of role based pay is payable quarterly and is subject to a holding period with restrictions lifting over five years (20% each year). 2 Tax liabilities on the Shares provided were met in cash and the number of Shares actually received by each individual was reduced by the value required to meet those liabilities. 3 The SVP was introduced in March 2010. SVP awards are granted to participants over Shares which may typically be released over a period of three years in equal annual tranches dependent on future service and the SVP rules. Discretionary dividend equivalent payments may also be made to participants on release of a SVP award. Since 2014, the Shares awarded to Directors and PDMRs have been subject to a six month holding period after release. SVP awards are also made to eligible employees for recruitment purposes under schedule 1 to the SVP (JSVP). 4 For further details on the Barclays LTIP, see previous disclosures in the Barclays Annual Report. -ENDS- For further information please contact: Investor Relations Media Relations Kathryn McLeland Tom Hoskin +44 (0)207 116 4943 +44 (0)20 7116 0699 This information is provided by RNS The company news service from the London Stock Exchange END RDSGGUACWUPQGPA (END) Dow Jones Newswires March 15, 2016 09:30 ET (13:30 GMT) 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart Barclays (LSE) Barclays Share News (BARC) Follow BARC Start Trading Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description Barclays LSE:BARC London Ordinary Share GB0031348658 ORD 25P Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade +0.55p +0.34% 163.80p 163.75p 163.85p 164.40p 161.35p 162.20p 18,571,377 14:10:15 Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m) Banks 25,987.0 2,073.0 -1.9 - 27,519.81 Print Alert Barclays PLC Director/PDMR Shareholding 15/03/2016 1:30pm UK Regulatory (RNS & others) Barclays (LSE:BARC) Intraday Stock Chart Today : Tuesday 15 March 2016 Click Here for more Barclays Charts. TIDMBARC RNS Number : 1629S Barclays PLC 15 March 2016 15 March 2016 Barclays PLC (the "Company") Director/PDMR Shareholding: Disclosure and Transparency Rules 3.1.4R (1)(a) Pursuant to the Financial Conduct Authority's Disclosure and Transparency Rule 3.1.4R, the Company announces that the trustee of the Barclays Group (PSP) Employees' Benefit Trust notified the Company on 14 March 2016 that on 14 March 2016 it had delivered ordinary shares of Barclays PLC with a nominal value of 25p each (the "Shares") to the Directors and Persons Discharging Managerial Responsibilities ("PDMR") of the Company as set out in the table below. The Shares delivered are: i. in respect of the quarterly payment of the Share element of the role based pay component(1) of PDMRs' fixed remuneration for the three months to 31 March 2016; ii. in respect of Share Incentive (Holding Period) Awards made in 2016 (the remaining Shares, after tax liabilities(2) were discharged, are now held in a nominee account on behalf of the individuals); and iii. to satisfy the release of Shares the subject of awards made under the Barclays Share Value Plan(3) (the "SVP") and the Barclays Long Term Incentive Plan(4) (the "LTIP") over the last three years. The market price on the date the Shares were provided was GBP1.6535 per Share and the place of trading was the London Stock Exchange. Director/ Shares Shares Balance PDMR provided deducted of Shares to Director/ to cover held by PDMR tax liabilities Director ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Jes Staley 1,090,169 512,380 3,390,786 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tushar Morzaria 643,494 302,444 1,272,360 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Michael Harte 287,242 135,005 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Bob Hoyt 483,562 227,277 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Robert Le Blanc 779,790 366,505 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Tristram Roberts 336,537 158,174 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Mike Roemer 211,989 99,638 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Amer Sajed 241,023 84,844 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Ashok Vaswani 1,085,037 509,972 ----------------- -------------- ----------------- ----------- Notes: 1 The Share element of role based pay is payable quarterly and is subject to a holding period with restrictions lifting over five years (20% each year). 2 Tax liabilities on the Shares provided were met in cash and the number of Shares actually received by each individual was reduced by the value required to meet those liabilities. 3 The SVP was introduced in March 2010. SVP awards are granted to participants over Shares which may typically be released over a period of three years in equal annual tranches dependent on future service and the SVP rules. Discretionary dividend equivalent payments may also be made to participants on release of a SVP award. Since 2014, the Shares awarded to Directors and PDMRs have been subject to a six month holding period after release. SVP awards are also made to eligible employees for recruitment purposes under schedule 1 to the SVP (JSVP). 4 For further details on the Barclays LTIP, see previous disclosures in the Barclays Annual Report. -ENDS- For further information please contact: Investor Relations Media Relations Kathryn McLeland Tom Hoskin +44 (0)207 116 4943 +44 (0)20 7116 0699 This information is provided by RNS The company news service from the London Stock Exchange END RDSGGUACWUPQGPA (END) Dow Jones Newswires March 15, 2016 09:30 ET (13:30 GMT) 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Year Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart 1 Month Barclays Chart
01/3/2016
15:40
smurfy2001: Selling Barclays Africa is CRAZY. WTF is the CEO doing?! Barclays’ decision to cut off its Africa operations – one of the few parts of its core business that generates a return above its cost of equity – is a sign of how far the continent has fallen in investors’ estimations and the cost of financial regulation. Perhaps it’s a statement of intent, signalling Barclays’ commitment to a leaner and simpler business model, while underscoring its poor pre-crisis move to buy South African lender Absa. Until last year, the group pointed to its Africa operations as one of its most attractive areas of growth. However, on Tuesday, Barclays said it would slim down its 62.3% Africa stake in the next two to three years, after reporting a drop in full-year profits and a dividend cut that triggered an 11% fall in its share price. Analysts at Citi are not impressed. "Africa attributable profit grew 4% on a constant currency basis in 2015 and the RoTE of 11.7% is higher than the core bank average and double the investment bank," they state. "Meanwhile, the majority of any capital benefit from selling the 62% stake is only likely to materialize when the holding drops below 20%, which could take two to three years. We question the rationale behind the disposal." What's more, Barclays says selling the African stake would boost its capital ratio by just one percentage point. The divestment, therefore, raises questions. If Barclays thinks antagonizing shareholders by selling off one of the few parts of its core business that generates a return on equity above its cost of equity is worth the risk, is that because it has particularly depressing read on Africa’s profitability prospects going forward? Barclays’ decision comes at a tough time for Africa. The downturn in the commodities cycle has highlighted many African countries’ lack of economic diversification, and in some cases – notably Nigeria – their governance challenges. The sale at first glance looks like the man at the top of the global financial community, Barclays’ CEO Jes Staley, is turning cold on Africa’s fundamental opportunities as well as its short-term difficulties. Meanwhile, it is hard to see how a Gulf or Chinese banking group – or a vehicle cobbled together by former Barclays CEO Bob Diamond – would bring better technical competence to African banking. Barclays’ African operations – from Ghana, to Kenya, to Zambia and beyond – are a unique franchise dating back more than 100 years. Of late, the business as a whole has also outperformed the only other big international banking group to have a widespread universal banking franchise on the continent, Standard Chartered. Perhaps the Barclays exit – rather than on comment on global banking regulation – indicts the prospects of the South Africa unit specifically. South Africa was always a poor and unrepresentative cheerleader for the rest of the continent’s much-feted resurgence, even during the commodities boom. Barclays’ South African business, however – a relatively new addition to the group – is the bank’s biggest national market on the continent. Aside from the regulatory costs of retaining the 62.3% stake in Barclays Africa, Staley highlights how Barclays Africa’s local currency ROE of 17% in 2015 has fallen to 8.7% at the group level, in sterling. South African policymakers – and arguably its president’s misjudged handling of finance ministry appointments – can take much of the blame for that. Absa Now Barclays could be selling out of a 100-year-old franchise largely because of a purchase it made little more than 10 ago – Absa. Barclays’ £2.9 billion acquisition of South Africa’s third biggest lender in 2005 might always have been a bad bet. Aside from South Africa’s poor growth prospects – developed country-style growth with frontier-market political risks – it might also have been the wrong bank. The old Barclays franchise in South Africa – before it exited during the late apartheid era – was FNB, now a thriving part of FirstRand. Hardly surprising, then, if the purchase of Absa was beset from the outset with cultural clashes. Barclays was buying one of its old rivals, while its old franchise remained a competitor. Absa and the rest of Barclays’ African businesses only got round to merging in 2013, despite it being part of the plan behind the acquisition. It was ironic, then, when two years ago Diamond’s newly launched African banking investment vehicle Atlas Mara bought a big chunk of another former Barclays franchise – Union Bank in Nigeria – now the continent’s biggest economy. How much more ironic if the rest of Barclays Africa – perhaps minus the old Absa franchise – were to end up back in Diamond’s hands via Atlas Mara. Whether or not a Diamond solution would be the best outcome for African banking is up for debate, but it is certainly not the only permutation imaginable. South Africa’s Public Investment Corporation (PIC), for one, would be keen to up its stake in Barclays Africa, according to management comments reported by local media last month. Interestingly, PIC – alongside Nedbank (the number-four South African lender) and Qatar National Bank – also holds a big stake in a home-grown pan-African group Ecobank, which unlike Barclays is less strong in east and southern Africa. Barclays’ Africa exit is just another post-crisis example of bulge-bracket banks’ downsizing their global footprint, but the move seems counter-intuitive given its profitability. Perhaps it serves as a positive signal to investors that the bank is becoming a more-simple, nimble franchise with a targeted transatlantic business strategy, and is, therefore, less prone, in theory, to event-driven and regulatory risk. Full article: hTTp://www.euromoney.com/Article/3533791/Category/0/ChannelPage/0/Staley-cements-Barclays-new-order-with-Africa-exit.html
Barclays share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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