Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Begbies Traynor Group LSE:BEG London Ordinary Share GB00B0305S97 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 72.125p 70.75p 73.50p - - - 0 06:33:37
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Support Services 49.7 0.6 -0.2 - 77.19

Begbies Traynor Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2151 to 2171 of 2175 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
17/11/2017
07:37
Notice of Results Begbies Traynor Group plc, the business recovery, financial advisory and property services consultancy, will announce its half year results for the six months ended 31 October 2017 on Tuesday, 12 December 2017.
aleman
13/11/2017
10:11
https://www.simplybusiness.co.uk/knowledge/articles/2017/11/begbies-traynor-warn-500k-businesses-could-be-about-to-go-bust/
norbert colon
10/11/2017
21:08
Well the share price is looking perky. Sort of reinforces the expectation that BEG historically moves up as the "wall of worry" builds. Next year looks a tough one for the UK economy. Of course, whether we have a full blown recession is likely to be driven by the US. But, with low volatility and some companies priced for perfection, there is little capacity for the market to deal with an external shock or maybe several bits of bad news.
topvest
08/11/2017
13:46
Two very good responses, and just to clarify i didn't buy at 160p i think average price was 78p they went to institutions at that level, just picked up £1200 dividend so will sell final holding today at around 73p, good luck to you all. finkie
finkie
08/11/2017
09:55
finkie - I'm also sympathise with your loss but feel it is not the same this time. The Great Recession may have been the worst financial crisis for 50 years, or 80 even, but was concentrated in financial companies rather than the wider economy, generally speaking. It might have been a large GDP fall but was not socially devastating in the same way as the 70s and early 80s recessions. The Bank of England slashed interest rates to protect the financial companies but that also protected thousands of low-productivity, highly indebted companies in the wider economy that should have gone bust in the downswing. Killing off zombies would improve the UK's productivity as labour and capital would be reallocated to more productive areas but it did not happen. That protection of financials that also saved zombies meant BEG did not do as well in the last recession as might normally be expected. Now, we have an economy that is slowing again and consumers and businesses are starting to go bust. Will they protect the zombies this time? Maybe they will pull another rabiit out of the hat and keep the zombies alive again - but, personally, I very much doubt they will manage it or even need to do it. Banks have stronger balance sheets and need less protection so the Bank of England will be more likely to let a recession run its course. I think many indebted low-productivity companies will go to the wall in a recession that will be more concentrated in small businesses. (It's already clobbering smaller retailers and construction firms.) All those companies that took on cheap immigrant labour rather than investing in the latest, most efficent technology will be in the firing line, I reckon. Will the immigrants go back home or will they add to the burden of the UK unemployment register? I don't know. But I think BEG will be much busier in this recession - unless there is some hidden weakness in the banking sector that forces the B of E into more extreme measures.
aleman
08/11/2017
09:25
I am sorry you bought these at 160p. With hindsight that was quite an elevated price. Since then Begbies made a number of acquisitions and should therefore have a higher potential in the cycle. Personally I would value them more for the long term earnings average. I thought 40p was cheap and I think even now 160p is expensive. I still wait to see how much hay they can make when the sun is, hem, going down on a few companies, when more realistic interest rates finally end the limbo existence of many zombie companies.
edmundshaw
06/11/2017
20:46
I’m selling out owned them for 10 years, not lost with divi reinvested but poor return over that period, price has gone down from 160p and they never moved during the worst financial crisis for 50 years (apart from going down further) ;0) met some of the management not impressive and they just don’t win the big jobs to propel the earnings significantly forward. It’s people heavy business so thick salaries and running costs, please don’t think this is the winner for a bear market, it wasn’t last time and I doubt it will be again.
finkie
02/11/2017
08:54
Bought into these. Looking technically strong and with a high stockrank.
essential
01/11/2017
11:18
Some mainstream coverage: Http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/11/01/half-million-firms-significant-distress-ahead-rate-rise-decision/ Http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/uk-interest-rates-rise-financial-distress-companies-firms-bankruptcy-close-brexit-vote-a8030911.html
aleman
01/11/2017
08:35
Yes; the tide is different (interest rates), but as it falls the same unappetising sight of skinny dippers seems inevitable. It is a classic effect that was deferred rather than avoided in the last crisis.
edmundshaw
01/11/2017
07:33
A very gloomy report, suggesting an increasing number of zombie companies that will fail if rates rise: Https://www.investegate.co.uk/article.aspx?id=201711010700061725V According to Begbies Traynor's Red Flag Alert research for Q3 2017, which monitors the financial health of UK companies, 448,011 businesses were experiencing 'Significant' levels of financial distress at the end of the quarter, up 27% compared to the same period last year (Q3 2016: 352,552); a worrying statistic that could increase still further should interest rates rise this week. It looks like a lot of companies that survived the last recession might not survive the next one.
aleman
27/10/2017
20:32
Thanks - it will certainly be interesting. Markets are definitely in the "greed" phase rather than the "fear" phase, but not bubble territory generally.
topvest
27/10/2017
18:49
There have been a lot of US companies missing forecasts and reducing guidance this summer - more amongst regional and national small and mid caps than international megacaps. Unsecured loan delinquencies and defaults have been rising rapidly, albeit from a low base. Falling car sales, etc. ... I'd find it very hard to believe the US was not slowing, too, so also view their recent slightly stronger GDP figures with scepticism.
aleman
27/10/2017
17:54
Very interesting as ever. The UK GDP number did sound a bit out of step with what we are seeing in the real world, so you may be right. The U.S. data is possibly harder to dispute?
topvest
27/10/2017
17:39
They don't tell you that revisions to GDP can be +/-0.5% or more for steadier times and much more, perhaps +/-1.5%, at turning points - the reason being because 55% of first estimates' data are (conservatively) modelled. So UK Q3 GDP is probably in the range 0.9% to -0.1% if we are in a period of steady growth but, possibly, if we were turning up or down it could be between +1.9% and -1.1%. I think we are approaching a downturn and Q3 GDP will be revised down. (This can take years and does not have to be second estimate.) Here are latest revisions for the last recession: Quarter ...... 2/08 3/08 4/08 1/09 2/09 3/09 4/09 Preliminary .. +0.2 -0.5 -1.5 -1.9 -0.8 -0.4 +0.1 Latest ....... -0.7 -1.7 -2.3 -1.6 -0.2 +0.1 +0.4 (See Table 2) Https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/nationalaccounts/uksectoraccounts/articles/economicreview/apr2017 So, what are the odds of +0.4% for Q3 being right? Why don't they quote error? And why do economists and financial journalists make such a fuss about 0.1% changes when they must know the error range could be 20-30 times that? When you look at insolvencies rising, credit growth slowing, defaults rising, company formations slumping, profit warnings jumped, retail sales slowing, car sales falling, van sales falling, housing prices slowing, house purchases decreasing, disposable income being squeezed, claimant count creeping up, and so on, it's hard to look at the history of GDP revisions and not expect that revisions will be down and possibly significantly so.
aleman
27/10/2017
16:59
Yes, all interesting. How do you see the bullish GDP numbers from the US and U.K. - these are not giving the same picture are they not?
topvest
27/10/2017
08:43
Insolvencies rose significantly in Q3. Adjusting for a technical distortion, the underlying number of corporate insolvencies was up 15.0% on Q2 and 14.5% on a year ago. Individuals' insolvencies rose 10.6% on the quarter and 7.7% on the year. In rough terms, overall insolvencies were the highest for 4 years, and the trend has been slightly up for nearly two years, probably with a little recent acceleration. Https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/655164/Insolvency_Statistics_-_Q3_2017_web.pdf
aleman
26/10/2017
15:42
Growth in the number of UK companies slowed in Q2 and slumped in Q3, as the number dissolved increased. Quarter Formed Dissolved Net formations Q1/14 147,274 87,223 60,051 Q2/14 148,393 92,515 55,878 Q3/14 141,807 96,561 45,246 Q4/14 136,184 97,138 39,046 Q1/15 159,397 83,312 76,085 Q2/15 153,422 87,047 66,375 Q3/15 147,049 99,219 47,830 Q4/15 138,802 90,437 48,365 Q1/16 172,096 134,157 37,939 (technical spike due to legal change in Q1/16) Q2/16 172,935 111,930 61,005 (and Q2, maybe?) Q3/16 154,685 102,681 52,004 Q4/16 146,987 111,133 35,854 Q1/17 170,143 108,919 61,224 Q2/17 152,411 114,756 37,655 Q3/17 153,307 129,734 23,573 See chart of slowing formations: Https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/incorporated-companies-in-the-uk-july-to-september-2017/incorporated-companies-in-the-uk-july-to-september-2017#incorporated-companies Recession starting?
aleman
26/10/2017
13:30
Well it looks like the recession has landed. Retail sales fall at fastest rate since March 2009 and axe jobs. Http://www.cbi.org.uk/news/retail-sector-sees-significant-drop-in-activity/ Https://uk.investing.com/news/economic-indicators/uk-retailers-cut-jobs-at-fastest-rate-since-2008--brc-520649
aleman
24/10/2017
06:43
Note that this does not take place immediately but is a proposal for legislation around 2019. I'd guess it might be a bit late for the downturn in this credit cycle. Https://www.gov.uk/government/news/those-suffering-from-problem-debt-to-get-vital-breathing-space
aleman
23/10/2017
19:59
Yes, the Pendragon profit warning was very notable today. An excellent H1 for new car sales, but H2 is slowing sharply. Shows that things are turning down fast. It's all starting to look rather cloudy!
topvest
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