Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Begbies Traynor Group Plc LSE:BEG London Ordinary Share GB00B0305S97 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.50p -0.58% 86.00p 84.50p 86.00p 88.50p 85.00p 85.00p 80,395 16:29:15
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Support Services 60.1 3.5 2.2 39.1 108

Begbies Traynor Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2551 to 2573 of 2575 messages
Chat Pages: 103  102  101  100  99  98  97  96  95  94  93  92  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/10/2019
20:23
It's not very high for such a cash generative company that has little demand on the cash it generates so it just keeps making small acquisitions and paying a growing dividend. The answer to your question is yes, the share price is up with events if there isn't a recession coming, but no it's still cheap if there is. (I think it's already here. Checkout Claimant Count - already up by half the total increase of the last recession, yet the B of E does not even look like cutting interest rates yet. Until they cut, I think BEG will keep getting busier.) Https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peoplenotinwork/outofworkbenefits/timeseries/bcjd/unem But don't forget they're expanding quite quickly now from the cash they're generating. 44 offices in Feb 2017 and 75 now plus cross-selling from the acquisitions. Recent years' forecasts have turned out to be slightly conservative.
aleman
12/10/2019
11:48
Looking at this p.e seems very high. Is shareprice up with event?
montyhedge
09/10/2019
16:28
Now, then. There's been a lot of buying over 86p in recent days but not as much movement as one might expect and some odd spread moves. Now we have 2 x 115k at 86p. Is that a big sell order finally clearing or something else?
aleman
08/10/2019
17:35
They have been appointed as administrators to Triumph Furniture in Wales as per the BBC web-site. That’s a pretty big one for Begbies, I would suggest.
topvest
08/10/2019
09:13
Timing the economy is not everything. You still have to pick the right investments. My record there is not bad at all but it's also nothing special. I've picked my fair share of duds.
aleman
08/10/2019
08:18
Well done. Very impressive. I had a high cash position and repaid my mortgage just before the last recession (in 2007 actually) so didn't do that badly. I think you seem to be ahead of the consensus though, so I very much appreciate and respect your thoughts. I'm c26% cash at the moment and thinking about opening a FTSE-SHORT ETF as and when things get jumpy.
topvest
07/10/2019
21:22
Yes. I'm on record of having called a recession by the end of 2008 after the yield curve inverted around June 2006. I posted that view on a few ADVFN threads then and subsequently. I sold my Lloyds shares at the time around £5.50. I became bullish again at the end of October 2008, as posted frequently on the JTC thread where some seemed to think I was mad. (See post 17015, 17111 and onwards.) The FTSE 250 double bottomed in October and November and the recent bull market started. I picked up a host of bargains on double figure yields over the following few months.
aleman
07/10/2019
20:56
US national debt has increased by about a third over the last 3 years. That's Trump's economic miracle (mirage) for you.
essentialinvestor
07/10/2019
20:53
We must also be very close to recession now that the UK government are talking of ending austerity. Politicians always get it hopelessly wrong. I also find that my employer always gets it wrong. You know when a recession is close when salary inflation is high....top of the market! At the end of the day, economic forecasts are totally unreliable, as ever. They are always based on projecting what happened yesterday, rather than really thinking about what will happen tomorrow. Politicians still seem to believe that the BREXIT forecasts are accurate. It will be the first forecast to be accurate, if it is!
topvest
07/10/2019
20:51
Interesting. We are not quite in recession yet in my view. Next year for me. Trump will be looking to prop up the US economy until he gets re-elected and so I wouldn't under-estimate what he can do to keep the wheels on, albeit temporarily. Out of interest, did you predict the last recession and when did you go bullish?
topvest
07/10/2019
20:43
Now. GDP at the start of slowdowns has a habit of being revised down later so we might be doing worse than the headline numbers. US auto sales were down 11% last month. Truck orders have been down 80% for a couple of months. RV sales are down about a quarter. Boat companies report falling orders. Harley laid workers off and several car plants are being closed. Lots of layoffs have been announced and GM workers have gone on strike while Boeing is in a mess. Semi-conductor sales are down. Freight rates are down. Corporate earnings are being revised into negative territory. Insiders are selling shares in record amounts. The weakening oil price is seeing insolvencies rise in the oil sector with banks on the hook for lots of debt. Mall vacancies just hit a record high. Some of the Regional Fed surveys plummetted recently and the small business survey weakened recently but looked worse if you examined the components that made it up. It already looks bad and likely to get worse as dominoes topple.
aleman
07/10/2019
20:23
You might be right. When would you predict the recession to take hold in the US and UK? I think next year could be sticky, running into 2021 with recovery starting in 2022 but estimating the future is near impossible.
topvest
07/10/2019
19:33
It could go a lot higher this time. The last recession was deep but was concentrated in the financial businesses and the sharp interest rate cuts quickly came to their rescue and saved loads of zombie companies in the wider economy that probably should have gone bust. (Those that don't make enough profit to cover interest, being the major definition. Estimates vary from 5-20% of firms but definitions vary.) I think the current recession could be more widespread through the sectors, even if not as as deep in GDP terms, but it is likely to be very harsh on zombies since there must be limits on how much lower rates can be taken when spreads jump. Last time, junk bond spreads rocketed but rate cuts offset some of the increase and soon brought them back down again as the market quickly regained its appetite for risk. This time, if junk bond spreads rocket, I don't see there being enough rate cuts to offset them, and QE will likely be restricted to top grade bonds, and the economy won't turn so quickly, so junk spreads will possibly stay sky high and zombies could go to the wall in numbers not seen before. If that's the case, BEG will be exceedingly busy. (Perhaps, the B of E will come up with some way to contain junk spreads. Who knows?) Beside the interest rate aspect, there is an increased domino effect from the government's new insolvency legislation that prioritises money owed to it, leaving less for other creditors. More supply and service companies will go bust from a customer not paying up in administration, or paying up less. The administrator will be settling government dues first. This might actually generate extra demand for credit amongst struggling smaller companies, and help to push junk bond spreads up even higher. Then add in more debt from student loans, car leases (with increasing negative equity rolled-over into longer leases), more credit cards (many on interest free periods) and higher balances, and this recession looks set to be a more difficult one on many levels. Now add in the wildcard of LIBOR being abolished in two years and that it's likely to get more volatile as it runs down at a time when any banking stresses might see it spike. Liquidity in LIBOR is expected to start drying up in H2 of next year. Some business loans, student loans, mortgages and car leases are linked to LIBOR and some will need renegotiating over the next two years as banks move over to loans linked to SOFR and/or SONIA. Some people will be struggling with their existing LIBOR loan in a recession and banks might not be terribly keen about renegotiating a new loan from some customers. What happens to LIBOR loans that were negotiated to run past liquid LIBOR next year or abolition in 2021? I fancy this will throw up problems. Some people are comparing this to the millenium bug. It might not be a problem if people put a lot of work in to head off the problems. If they don't ....
aleman
07/10/2019
19:09
Yes, it's taken forever, but are we back in a big upswing before the next recession. Last time is 11 years ago when it got to £2. My initial target is over a £1, but could go to £1.50 I think.
topvest
07/10/2019
18:45
Highest close for nearly 10 years.
aleman
07/10/2019
18:37
Bristol construction company behind Bear Woods at Wild Place Project collapses into administration (Begbies) hxxps://www.bristolpost.co.uk/whats-on/whats-on-news/bristol-construction-company-behind-bear-3400328 Looks bearish to me!
magic
07/10/2019
13:41
Been some steady buying at 86.4p or higher and the spread is getting a bit wide. Often, that's a sign of marketmakers being short of stock. I'm wondering if there's been another tip somewhere but, regardless, a new high looks possible.
aleman
01/10/2019
11:58
It's all looking very positive here. 100p target.
topvest
30/9/2019
22:48
Remember that businesses don't run out of cash just from trading activity. In the credit crunch of 2008, some companies had their overdrafts halved with no notice and found they could not revolve longer debt at suddenly increased rates for lower grades of debt. In steady times, there might be regular seasonal cycles, but these can go out of the window when banks start getting into trouble. (And there have been liquidity shortages in the US and China recently - not that that necessarily has any influence on the UK, though it might be possible.)
aleman
30/9/2019
21:34
thanks, maybe the two tips together gave beg such a boost. I see about half the gains were clawed back by end of day motley fool is a bit self referencing, re quoting BEG, and a bit superficial the peak insolvency month was March for 2018 wouldn't surprise me if there is an even larger peak in march 2020, as businesses run out of cash after xmas hxxps://insolytics.co.uk/insolytics-league-table/
magic
30/9/2019
17:40
Tipped by Motley Fool over the weekend, too. Https://www.fool.co.uk/investing/2019/09/28/worried-about-brexit-2-dividend-shares-id-buy-for-my-isa-before-a-possible-no-deal-exit-next-month/
aleman
30/9/2019
14:42
thanks, bit surprised at size of bounce, +12%,83p (14.30). I guess Mail has a large readership. Not sure if it will hold. Encouraging that uninformed money makes this difference, even before headlines about actual large increases in bankruptcies. Highlights possibly the difference between perception and the actual financials for BEG.
magic
30/9/2019
08:24
Https://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/investing/article-7515543/MIDAS-SHARE-TIPS-Profit-Begbies-Traynor-firm-booms-going-bust.html
aleman
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