Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Aviva Plc LSE:AV. London Ordinary Share GB0002162385 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -5.90p -1.18% 493.40p 493.40p 493.50p 503.60p 493.40p 500.20p 4,245,986 14:23:27
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Life Insurance 27,606.0 2,374.0 35.0 14.1 19,481.78

Aviva Share Discussion Threads

Showing 23051 to 23071 of 23075 messages
Chat Pages: 923  922  921  920  919  918  917  916  915  914  913  912  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
13/8/2018
21:12
edmundshaw - "egregious pescatorial analogies" haha made me laugh, keep 'em comming :-)
losos
13/8/2018
19:26
exd 16.08.2018 9.25p.
a0148009
13/8/2018
11:59
Someone interested in ESure, AV. also on a lowly forward PE.
mo123
13/8/2018
10:59
With interest rates rising, pref shares are likely to get cheaper. Whether that drop will cover the cost of more expensive debt for Aviva (when deciding if and when to buy them at the market price) is a difficult one. I think the board have bigger fish to fry than to worry about that kind of detail right now... small fry and a potential can of worms (please forgive the egregious pescatorial analogies).
edmundshaw
12/8/2018
09:27
And as has been mentioned it's now an exercise 50% more expensive than the cancelation plan would've been. I dont think theyll be bought up until such point they no longer count as regulatory capital which is a few years off.
quady
11/8/2018
12:46
It's just that the price of prefs is arguably a bit depressed from the fright the board gave the holders (even though rising interest rates make a small fall in the prices reasonable). Buying back before a full recovery would be easy to attack.
edmundshaw
11/8/2018
12:01
edmundshaw - I am not aware of anything preventing the Co's broker from being told to sit on the bid and slowly hoover them up for cancellation?
ianood
11/8/2018
10:50
I think buying back the prefs at market value would be an acceptable thing to do. Expensive, yes, but grubby, no. The only grubby thing was trying to force holders of "irredeemable" securities to wind up their holdings at a substantial discount to the prevailing market price. I say this as an (ordinary) shareholder and do not, nor ever have, held the prefs.
danielbird193
11/8/2018
10:08
Long term it shouldn't make a difference, but short term I agree Graham. Perhaps Aviva could buy in the prefs at some point. But obviously it would look too grubby to do that any time soon... :-( ... -_-
edmundshaw
10/8/2018
20:00
In my experience, buybacks offer private investors far less benefit than increased or special dividends, while buybacks offer institutional investors an easy route to realising some of the investment and give direct benefit to directors' bonuses via increases in EPS.
grahamburn
10/8/2018
16:58
To point the obvious, £450m of that capital was to go on cancelling the perfs. Since that's not happening a special could be on the cards..... or just extending the buyback... minus the £15m compensation naturally. £400m would be a 10p/share special which seems plausible but I'd bet on extending the buyback. Happy either way tbh. With moving the payout ratio from 50% to 55-60% over the next couple of years the regular yield gets a superboost by cancelling shares (the AV buyback is cancelling them right?)
quady
10/8/2018
16:58
Agree that this is a better bet than BT or CNA. VOD is attractive to me and has some growth potential from recent acquisitions in Germany / Eastern Europe as well as 5G roll-out in the UK.
danielbird193
10/8/2018
16:24
Think this is probably a better play than some the other high yielders that I hold. Might get 7% on VOD/BT/CNA but it’s more likely to grow here and the extra 1-2% is easily lost in capital. I’m reorganising my SIPP and think this will be a decent chunk.
dr biotech
10/8/2018
15:27
Maddox - "Any thoughts on IC's comment?" I have found that the IC writers do tend to 'daydream' a tad :-) It makes their articles more 'juicy' and let's face it sometimes a company will surprise the market with a positive announcement. 'tho IMO it's more usually a negative one haha.
losos
10/8/2018
13:30
There has never been any guidance given by the company that any form of special dividend will be paid. It has only been that the £2bn excess capital would be spent as £900m debt reduction £500m on acquisitions, and £600m on share buybacks of which £376m has already been done so far. See page 9 of the interim presentation "Disciplined deployment of surplus capital"
scrwal
10/8/2018
11:11
Very encouraging comments from IC. I agree that it's unlikely they will pay a special dividend, but I'm quite happy with the 10% year-on-year increase in the interim (9.25p this year compared to 8.4p last year). Assuming they can increase the final dividend by the same amount (20.9p compared to 19.0p) that would give total dividend of 30.15p for the year, which is around 6% at the current share price.
danielbird193
10/8/2018
10:57
Hi Daniel, Aviva - 'income on the cheap' are a Buy Tip in Investors Chronicle at 496p and forecast 6.8% yield (5.7% currently on a historic basis). One quote of interest is: "This year it will return more than £500m to shareholders through a mix of buying back preference and ordinary shares and paying special dividends." Not sure about the special dividends being on the agenda. I've read (RNS 1st May) that they have £2bn of XS capital to be utilised - £900m debt reduction, £500m on acquisitions and £600m committed to share buy-backs. So whilst a special would be nice it doesn't seem to be on the cards. Any thoughts on IC's comment? Regards Maddox
maddox
10/8/2018
10:51
Hi Daniel, Aviva - 'income on the cheap' are a Buy Tip in Investors Chronicle at 496p and forecast 6.8% yield (5.7% currently on a historic basis). One quote of interest is: "This year it will return more than £500m to shareholders through a mix of buying back preference and ordinary shares and paying special dividends." Not sure about the special dividends being on the agenda. I've read that they have £2bn of XS capital to be utilised - £900m debt reduction, £500m on acquisitions and £600m committed to share buy-backs. So whilst a special would be nice it doesn't seem to be on the cards. Any thoughts on IC's comment? Regards Maddox
maddox
03/8/2018
14:03
That's the one! Didn't know how to post images here.
danielbird193
03/8/2018
13:02
There's a lovely chart in yesterday's results presentation (on the Aviva IR website) which bridges from NAV at 1 January to NAV at 30 June. Lovely to see both dividends of 19p per share and share buybacks of 5p per share totally covered by operating profit of 27p per share. Plenty of other fat yielders are borrowing to pay dividends which is clearly unsustainable as rates start to creep up. I hope to be a happy holder for many years to come.
danielbird193
03/8/2018
12:54
Good idea! Think I tried that 20 years ago, made a load, lost a load, paid even more tax and then ended up where I'd started. Much more civilised on here...I added some more yesterday, dividends are increasingly important to me.
uppompeii
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