Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tesco LSE:TSCO London Ordinary Share GB0008847096 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +2.95p +1.66% 180.65p 180.65p 180.70p 180.75p 176.35p 177.50p 8,040,685 14:37:11
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 55,917.0 145.0 -0.5 - 14,768.07

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Tesco (TSCO) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
13:38:03180.662,8735,190.22O
13:37:56180.681,6402,963.18NT
13:37:53180.696011,085.95NT
13:37:29180.661,6562,991.65O
13:37:20180.6521,33038,532.65O
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Tesco (TSCO) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
26/4/2017
09:20
Tesco Daily Update: Tesco is listed in the Food & Drug Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker TSCO. The last closing price for Tesco was 177.70p.
Tesco has a 4 week average price of 173.05p and a 12 week average price of 173.05p.
The 1 year high share price is 219.40p while the 1 year low share price is currently 143.45p.
There are currently 8,174,965,105 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 40,490,227 shares. The market capitalisation of Tesco is £14,723,112,154.11.
22/4/2017
08:40
capeview: tenapen, I'm not saying it's healthy but when others keep saying Lewis is the best for the money and nothing to back it up, I don't know whats worse. I would love to hear feedback from others who may have more info to hand than me as to why Tesco is a great investment at the moment when you consider how poorly the share price is doing right now. And I'm sure you don't agree that paying the people running the company huge salaries and bonuses along with large Share handouts as a healthy or ethical thing when you consider how poor the share price is and the severe lack on any real information coming from the board on there Road Map for success?
21/4/2017
18:02
capeview: I'm sure there is a saying somewhere about people who ignore the lunatic in the room at there own peril or some such. I did have Porty on filter at one stage but I like to see what he posts from time to time because i DON'T ignore the the so called lunatic. I'm not saying it's healthy that its day in day out, but I must say, I don't see a lot of people on here actually saying what Lewis and his board of directors is actually doing that makes me think Tesco is a worthwhile investment. Yes, we have Porty going off on one almost everyday, but I've never seen anyone else post anything that warrants the Boards payouts and share handouts, or why the Share price has nose dived so much over the last few weeks let alone months. I've not been on the boards much over the years so I don't know people as well as some others do, but I've yet to see any evidence from anybody else as to why Tesco is doing a good job and warrants there huge salaries and large handouts. After all, when the fish counter at my decent large local says Fresh Alaskan Salmon farmed, and the guy who I talk to behind the counter has said the managers are unwilling to change the title to Farmed Salmon because it's not Fresh Alaskan Salmon, then what else are the management of Tesco not doing. Yes, staff quality has improved, the helpfulness is better, but it's a huge miss compared to how the shopping experience is in Waitrose. And not only that, the quality of some of the food is definitely a bit poor when so called fresh produce doesn't last very well. Tesco Mobile and Banking are good services but they always were, that wasn't Lewis Work or his board. So what, if anything, can people say about Tesco and the Managing board of directors and there huge salaries and bonuses warrants the Poor performance of the share price when the Reports have been supposedly so good. Takers anyone, Would love to hear the feedback. Also, I'm not into bashing Porty, but I'm also not ignoring him either, because I'm not seeing anyone else come across with anything constructive except for saying Porty is the village lunatic.
18/4/2017
17:50
lufc5: Less than three years ago, Tesco (LON:TSCO) was in dire straits. It had recently announced a possible overstatement of profits, its sales growth was negative and its outlook was downbeat. Fast forward to today and the company’s potential for rising profitability as well as an increasing share price is high. The catalyst for this revolution is the company’s CEO, Dave Lewis, and the rest of its management team. Although a relative unknown when he took the job in September 2014, he has had a huge influence on the company’s fortunes. He and his team have made the business smaller, simpler and provided a clear sense of identity for a company which was becoming lost in its pursuit of conglomerate-like status. The speed of change at the company has probably surprised most investors. However, it shows the difference which can be made by having the right management team in place. In my view, a company’s reputation, balance sheet strength and economic moat count for little unless the right team is in place to manage it. Scope for change Prior to the arrival of Dave Lewis as CEO, Tesco had become a jack-of-all-trades and, arguably, a master of none. It had diversified into a number of frivolous sectors which ultimately sapped management time and investment capital away from the majority of its business. For example, it sought to become a major player in the USA grocery industry via its Fresh & Easy brand. While it was at times able to post strong LFL sales growth, high profitability proved elusive despite significant investment. At the same time as expanding into the USA, Tesco also sought to diversify its operations away from groceries. While this is understandable in some respects, since the company had become the dominant grocery store in the UK, the choice of industries was sometimes difficult to follow. For example, Tesco decided to sell its own tablet, purchased garden centres, coffee shops and even ventured into used car sales for a short while. None of these ventures proved as successful as had been envisaged and they created, rather than reduced, risk in my opinion. All of these changes were being put in place at a time when Tesco faced its biggest challenges in a number of years. UK consumer spending was under severe pressure and no-frills alternatives such as Lidl and Aldi were grabbing market share. At a time when it should have been seeking a ‘lean and mean’ efficiency drive, Tesco had lost focus and discipline. Major changes The enormity of the task facing Tesco’s new management team was difficult to overestimate. However, a number of simple, logical decisions helped to gradually turn the company around and even more importantly, set out a clear vision for how the company would change in the long run. …a number of simple, logical decisions helped to gradually turn the company around… First, Tesco returned to being a grocer. Non-core activities were shunned in order to create a simpler, more efficient and more manageable entity. Second, Tesco focused on its UK operations. While controversial at the time given its success in territories such as Korea, this decision allowed the company’s management to drive all capital into improving the bulk of the business. Third, Tesco sought to compete with lower-cost rivals through reducing the ranges on offer, cutting costs and also investing in store refurbishments and customer service. The latter of these changes helped to create a degree of customer loyalty and product differentiation versus Aldi and Lidl. This resonated well with customers at a time when the UK economy was emerging from the financial crisis. Although still highly price conscious, real-terms wage growth helped to dilute the focus on price and make other factors such as convenience, customer service and quality more important to the company’s target market of customers. Future strategy While Tesco has become a better business under its current management team, it faces an uncertain future. Inflation and wage growth in the UK are now at the same level of 2.3%. However, it seems highly probable that inflation will surpass wage growth in the coming months, since a weak pound is gradually filtering through into higher prices. This is likely to cause a squeeze on consumer spending and lead to a more price conscious consumer. In response, Tesco is continuing to improve its financial strength and core profitability. It reduced net debt by 27% in the most recent financial year and is on course to deliver £1.5 billion in cost savings over the medium term. This could allow it to reach an operating margin of 4% by 2020, which would represent an almost doubling of its current operating margin of 2.3%. Given the potential for lacklustre sales growth due to weakness in consumer spending, efficiency and sustainability measures could help the company to outperform its rivals. Alongside this, investment in its core products such as the £300 million announced in its full-year results may also prove to be a sound strategy to pursue, given the likelihood of greater competition within the UK grocery industry. Outlook In my opinion, Tesco is one of the most successful recent turnaround stories in the FTSE 350. Although its recovery is not yet complete, its transition from failure to success has been swift and at least partly unexpected. It is now positioned to deliver double-digit EPS growth in each of the next two years and has become a more efficient and sustainable growth opportunity for investors. Key to this has been its current management team. They have refocused the business on the UK, left behind dreams of a conglomerate-like business model and sought to deliver an improved product offering to compete for customers. While economic difficulties could lie ahead, the continued focus on efficiency and the possible synergies from the Booker acquisition could drive Tesco’s profitability and share price higher.
31/3/2017
09:53
loganair: Earlier this week Schroders and Artisan Partners came out strongly against the deal, saying it would be a distraction to Tesco when its own turnaround efforts were just starting to work. Schroders fund manager Nick Kirrage told the Financial Times: “They’re paying 23 times the peak profit of the business. We’re not opposed to a deal at any price. But if you start from there, it’s hard to get to a multiple of profits that we would think objectively is a sensible place for them to start to create value.” Daniel O'Keefe, fund manager at Artisan Partners, told the newspaper he thought the merger plan was too ambitious. “Let’s say that things go really, really well, which they almost never do in acquisitions but just suppose,” he said. “Getting Tesco back to normal operating margins is worth maybe £11bn to shareholders. They’re putting that at risk to do a £3.7bn deal.” Clive Black at Shore Capital today added his own scepticism on the deal, telling clients “in a nutshell we deem this to be non-transformational for Tesco and possibly a big risk for Booker”. He believes the potential for the deal to fall through presents a major risk for Booker and shareholders should walk away before they lose too much money. The broker rates Booker at ‘sell’. “Indeed, we struggle to see how Booker could regain its long-standing premium ratings (price-earnings ratio, enterprise value [EV] divided by underlying earnings [EBITDA] or EV/sales) here on and there is, therefore, very considerable downside risk from a failure to complete,” ShoreCap said. “Added to which, if Booker shareholders really want Tesco paper then they can buy it at any time they want. Accordingly, with the link to the Tesco share price, we continue to suggest that Booker shareholders remove the merger risk, reflect on the time value of money - because they can easily invest at short notice in Tesco - and move on.” He thinks investors should dump the stock. For Tesco, the market’s reaction has been underwhelming with investors opposing the merger and the company’s shares failing to hold onto gains since the deal was announced. The group will need to do a lot more convincing to receive acceptance of the deal, ShoreCap said, reiterating a 'hold' rating on the stock. “Tesco will have to present a more compelling case for this merger, we sense, than the very amateurish presentation pack for this still fine establishment that was produced at the time of the merger announcement, one which sadly was subject to much ridicule and comic appraisal in many of our exchanges with the market in subsequent weeks,” the broker said.
09/3/2017
11:35
loganair: As I posted a couple of weeks ago, I´ve read a few reports saying that when the competition authority start to get their teeth into the Booker take over that they expect the Tesco share price to fall to 150p. Slowly, but surely Tesco´s share price has been nudging itself downwards.
24/2/2017
11:44
sailastra: For those interested...Lewis put his feet under his desk September 2014. The share price started 2010 well above 400p The major collapse started in October 2013 when a down trend in the share price was established at 370p that down trend was finally broken in mid Feb of 2016 from which time the down trend line became a support level. The up trend began in June of 2016...That up trend has held although is being tested today... Blaming Lewis is like blaming the fireman for the fire....and arguing that he has destroyed the share price is asinine...In truth it has merely gone sideways at these levels....Tesco was badly managed and did not read the future, it is however a potentially great business but like Rome it will take more than a day to rebuild.
30/1/2017
12:44
capeview: I don't think share price is that big of an issue when you consider sainsburys has been in the same boat too. August 2014 £3.00 Today £2.55 Maybe They have the same issues as Tesco. Morrisons on the other hand, not being as big as sainsburys or Tesco, £1.60 in august 2014 now £2.40 Yes, the bigger issue is the directors paying themselves huge salaries when the share price is poor and there is no dividend, but that is an issue for the whole system not just one company. Too much you pat my back I'll pat yours, when it's the share holders and consumers that are being done over. Also, bigger companies take longer to turn around. More chaff to dump, more issues to resolve and more challenges to solve. Smaller companies have less baggage.
27/1/2017
10:25
alphahunter: As often with mergers/take-overs, there has been an overshoot in TSCO share price. Day-trading short is looking good.
22/4/2015
19:10
bobsidian: Given the relatively minor share price fall on the release of these results, it is well to see just how much had already been priced in en route to the lows of last December when the share price was in comparative freefall. Interesting to see the share price fall of today stall at the 200 day Simple Moving Average whilst already hitting technically oversold territory according to the 14 day Relative Strength Indicator. In the absence of a broader equity market sell off it would be surprising to see the share price revisit its December lows. Given the share price insanity elsewhere across equity markets as the discount mechanism incorporates multiple years worth of earnings and their cumulative perceived pace of growth, TSCO trading on a current P/E ratio of 25 is hardly demanding. And with the earnings bar now being set so relatively low, future earnings outperformance on an underlying basis could be perceived as achievable. However, should the day come when there is a broader equity market sell off on the back of generalised reduced earnings visibility then there is little doubt that the share price now has plenty of scope for a sympathetic downside move. With TSCO being the behemoth that it is, it can certainly release cash in a variety of ways to fund its rationalisation without the need to undergo a capital raising exercise. Being in such a position would doubtless make TSCO a source of envy to many other companies across different sectors. Time now for an effective business consolidator to tidy up the mess of previous business creators.
28/11/2014
08:20
mornington crescent: kazoom the chart was posted as much for its entertainment value as anything else One year charts for MRW and OCDO look very similar SBRY ia about a quarter of the size of TSCO and so is MRW so comparison is not very meaningful SBRY share price is lower than it was 20 years ago (thats as far back as my charts go, so I dont know where the floor might be TSCO share price has fallen to where it was 10 years ago but has reached an obvious chart support level
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