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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Saga Plc LSE:SAGA London Ordinary Share GB00BMX64W89 ORD 15P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  7.80 2.98% 269.80 3,372 08:00:37
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
263.40 268.60 269.80 269.80 269.80
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Life Insurance 841.50 -162.00 -14.50 378
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
08:03:21 O 181 267.2338 GBX

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Date Time Title Posts
03/12/202008:17Close Brothers bring SAGA to market3,928
03/12/202005:08SAGA - Recovery play potential 10x to 15x bagger659
20/11/202013:05Saga -no bus tokens to ride3,837
03/10/202008:02*** Saga - Insurance company ***12
01/4/202014:19Spirit of Discovery67

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Saga (SAGA) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
02/12/2020
08:20
Saga Daily Update: Saga Plc is listed in the Life Insurance sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker SAGA. The last closing price for Saga was 262p.
Saga Plc has a 4 week average price of 130.60p and a 12 week average price of 118.50p.
The 1 year high share price is 816.75p while the 1 year low share price is currently 118.50p.
There are currently 140,102,227 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 2,088,076 shares. The market capitalisation of Saga Plc is £367,067,834.74.
03/12/2020
00:20
koetser: from telegraph: British cruise line Saga Cruises has become the first cruise operator to be awarded Shield+ accreditation from Lloyd’s Register for coronavirus risk management – the highest category of health assurance granted by the maritime safety experts. The accreditation recognises enhanced safety procedures put in place to reduce the risk of infection, transmission and a subsequent coronavirus outbreak on board two Saga ships: Spirit of Discovery and the line’s brand new ship Spirit of Adventure, which is due to set sail for the first time in May 2021. Speaking exclusively to The Telegraph, Nick Stace, Saga’s chief executive of travel, said: “We want to create the safest place in the world to see the world, and that’s what I think we can do with this [the Shield+ accreditation].̶1; “I can’t see how you could be safer, than to be on one of our ships. We test five days in advance of coming on board, we then ask for five days of isolation and our customers, I know, will support us on that. ADVERTISING “We then have a sealed car, with a driver who has been tested, come and pick you up and take you to the port where you’re tested again. On board, you’ll find social distancing measures and an isolation wing, should any problems occur. I can’t think you would find anywhere, other than the Sahara desert, that is safer.” Mr Stace is confident that, come Easter, land-locked Britons will be able to take to the water once again. He told Telegraph Travel: “I bet my mortgage on it. Really I feel very confident and the reason why I feel so confident, is that we have done everything and more that the government asked of us.” Nick Stace, Saga Travel Nick Stace: 'There’s pent-up frustration – we’ve got the newest fleet in the world and it’s stuck in Tilbury' When asked whether his company was prepared to pay for Covid outbreak repatriations – a key stipulation of the government taskforce’s recent report on restarting cruising – Mr Stace said: “The FCDO [Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office] is concerned about repatriation costs but as a sector, we have guaranteed that they won’t have to spend a penny on repatriation. There are protocols in place that mean [repatriation] will always be at our cost.” Now all that is needed is for the FCDO to lift the advice, which was most recently updated in July, that British nationals should avoid all travel on ocean-going cruise ships. This move is supported by Mr Stace: “The FCDO advice needs to be dropped. It’s out of date. It will take us, and the rest of the sector, three months to resume from the moment the starting gun is fired. We need that starting gun to be fired this year, not drifting into next year. ” He warned that “if the advice is not removed soon, we will see a £10 billion industry with 88,000 jobs at risk going across the oceans to other destinations and not carrying on here.” “Now we won’t do that because we are UK flagged, UK owned… but others will. And the government, if they are not careful, are pushing the sector to the point where they will take their ships and leave UK waters.” Spirit of Adventure's delayed inaugural voyage is scheduled for May 2021 Spirit of Adventure's delayed inaugural voyage is scheduled for May 2021 Mr Stace admitted that it had been very hard on his staff, many of whom have been on an indefinite hiatus since the outbreak of coronavirus, and “cannot wait to get our vessels back out there.” He revealed: “There’s pent-up frustration – we’ve got the newest fleet in the world and it’s stuck in Tilbury.” The boss of Saga noted that Covid-19 isn’t the first time that the industry has experienced choppy waters and believes cruise can weather the current storm. He told The Telegraph: “With vaccines in sight, bookings have doubled in recent weeks. We’ve never seen such high demand in our 24 years of cruising. Resilience is extraordinary among our customers.” When Saga Cruises is finally given a date to set sail again, who would he most like to welcome onboard? “The foreign secretary [Dominic Raab]. I think he has had the wrong impression of cruise,” said Mr Stace, without missing a beat. “And as the foreign secretary – and as we are a seafaring nation entering into global Britain without the European Union – I think he should come on the high seas with us and see what flying the UK flag can do for UK plc, and what pleasure cruise can bring to the world
02/12/2020
11:02
koetser: from motley: It’s been a crazy six weeks. Since hitting a low of 120p on 19 October, the Saga (LSE: SAGA) share price has risen by more than 100% to around 255p. The cause of this surge isn’t a mystery. Vaccine news has sent many UK shares rocketing higher. But unlike some stocks, I think Saga’s share price still looks quite cheap. In this piece I’ll explain why this over-50s insurance and travel specialist has caught my eye recently. Safe sailing with Saga Saga’s insurance business makes most of its profits. But the group’s over-50s travel offering is one of the ways it’s able to differentiate itself with customers. At the heart of this are Saga’s two, modern cruise ships. These nearly-new ships are smaller than average. They aim to provide a high-quality, boutique experience for passengers. This includes the latest technology for air conditioning and hygiene. I expect these to become hot topics for cruise ship operators following the pandemic. Indeed, I think that Saga is probably ahead of the wider market here. The company recently became the first cruise operator to be awarded the Shield+ health assurance accreditation by Lloyd’s Register, the maritime safety experts. This accreditation covers a wide range of measures Saga is taking to reduce the risk of infectious diseases like Covid-19 and norovirus spreading on board its ships. I expect more cruise ship operators to follow. But I think Saga’s lead in this area should help to attract passengers for when cruise sailings restart in April. That could be good for the Saga share price. Customer loyalty Having said that, Saga may not need to worry about finding passengers. The company recently said that bookings for next year across its holiday business where ahead of the same point last year. Admittedly, cruise bookings are lagging behind slightly compared to last year. However, Saga says this is due to a deliberate delay in marketing activity. Despite this, the firm says it has already secured more than 40% of the cruise revenue it’s targeting for next year. Cruise ship passengers have a reputation for loyalty, with many becoming regular cruisers with the same brand. I feel that if Saga’s new ships live up to their promise, the firm should benefit from this customer loyalty. Why I like the Saga share price Analysts’ consensus forecasts suggest that Saga will return to profit next year. Based on the latest projections, the shares trade on a modest seven times forecast earnings. I think there are some other reasons to like this stock too. Although Saga’s finances looked shaky earlier this year, the group has now secured £150m of new funding. This includes £100m contributed by Sir Roger De Haan, who is the son of the firm’s founder. Sir Roger is also Saga’s former chief executive and will now become its chairman. I think it’s fair to assume that Sir Roger has a good understanding of Saga’s business and is confident it can be returned to growth. Although nothing is certain, I believe Saga’s current share price will look cheap in a few years’ time. I’d be happy to buy the shares for my portfolio.
27/11/2020
08:09
koetser: RNS Number : 6956G SAGA PLC 27 November 2020 27 November 2020 Saga plc ("Saga" or "the Group") Saga awarded first industry-leading COVID health accreditation Saga has become the first cruise operator to be awarded new COVID-19 health assurance accreditation by Lloyd's Register, the maritime safety experts. The move is a crucial step ahead of the planned return of cruise operations in spring next year in a COVID-secure environment. Lloyd's Register has awarded Saga the Shield+ accreditation, the highest category of health assurance they have. The new framework has been created to reduce risk and provide greater confidence in the safety procedures of operators against the introduction of infectious diseases onboard cruise ships, including COVID-19, Norovirus and common flu, as the industry works with government to restart an industry that employs 88,000 people and is worth £10bn a year to the British economy. Being awarded the accreditation demonstrates that Saga exceeds the compliance criteria in every category set out by the UK Chamber of Shipping in their guidance for COVID Secure Cruising, which has been supported by the government. The safety accreditation is assessed against six key categories covering every aspect of ship safety where health risks are elevated: medical, policy, food, ventilation, accommodation and water. Award of the accreditation follows months of detailed planning from Saga, designing and putting in place detailed new procedures to meet the highest standards of health and safety. Saga's ships have been surveyed and inspected in all key areas and the accreditation has been awarded for both the Spirit of Discovery and the Spirit of Adventure, Saga's brand new ship, which is due to set sail for the first time in May 2021.
24/11/2020
06:56
cl0ckw0rk0range: Will the 300p Saga share price ever return to £8?Rupert Hargreaves | Sunday, 22nd November, 2020 | More on: SAGAInvestors have been rushing to the Saga (LSE: SAGA) share price during the past few weeks. Following the completion of the company’s fundraising, the stock has jumped by more than 100% in just a few weeks.And I think this could be just the start of a long rally for the stock. That’s why I’m considering adding the shares to my portfolio today.5G is here â€" and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential...Saga share price performanceI think it is fair to say 2020 was not the year Saga was expecting. The company, which has been trying to turn itself around for seven years, was betting that the launch of its new cruise business would help return it to growth. Unfortunately, with the new fleet, and the rest of the cruise ship industry mothballed for 2020, this hasn’t happened.So, management has had to get radical. Saga undertook a huge capital raising to strengthen its balance sheet. At the same time, a management clear-out brought new and old blood back to the board.Positive trends have also started to develop in the group’s non-cruise businesses. These divisions have been a thorn in the side of the company for some time. However, green shoots are starting to show. This is highly encouraging. While 2020 has mostly been a washout for the organisation’s new cruise business, other divisions have begun to pick up the slack after years of problems.These trends suggest to me that when the world is back up and running, the Saga share price may take off. The combination of new sales from the cruise business, as well as growth in existing divisions, could provide some significant growth tailwinds.Growth tailwindsIt’s difficult for me to predict, at this stage, what sort of growth the company will be able to achieve going forward. However, City analysts reckon the firm will report earnings per share of 37p for its 2022 financial year. Compared to the current stock price of 300p, this suggests the shares look cheap at current levels.That being said, there’s no guarantee the company will hit analysts’ projections. A lot could go wrong between now and 2022. However, I think the predictions clearly show the Saga share price’s potential. In the best-case scenario, analysts reckon the group could earn up to 70p per share for 2022.Either way, it seems to me as if the stock is deeply undervalued at current levels and offers a wide margin of safety. That’s why I’m considering the investment for my portfolio today. In the base-case scenario, the stock looks cheap, and in the best-case scenario, it looks even cheaper.Based on these projections, I think the Saga share price offers an attractive risk-reward profile. That’s exactly what I’m looking for when making an investment â€" the potential for large capital gains and minimal risk of loss at the same time.
22/11/2020
14:28
koetser: Will the 300p Saga share price ever return to £8? Rupert Hargreaves | Sunday, 22nd November, 2020 | More on: SAGA Investors have been rushing to the Saga (LSE: SAGA) share price during the past few weeks. Following the completion of the company’s fundraising, the stock has jumped by more than 100% in just a few weeks. And I think this could be just the start of a long rally for the stock. That’s why I’m considering adding the shares to my portfolio today. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit! According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air… And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential... Saga share price performance I think it is fair to say 2020 was not the year Saga was expecting. The company, which has been trying to turn itself around for seven years, was betting that the launch of its new cruise business would help return it to growth. Unfortunately, with the new fleet, and the rest of the cruise ship industry mothballed for 2020, this hasn’t happened. So, management has had to get radical. Saga undertook a huge capital raising to strengthen its balance sheet. At the same time, a management clear-out brought new and old blood back to the board. Positive trends have also started to develop in the group’s non-cruise businesses. These divisions have been a thorn in the side of the company for some time. However, green shoots are starting to show. This is highly encouraging. While 2020 has mostly been a washout for the organisation’s new cruise business, other divisions have begun to pick up the slack after years of problems. These trends suggest to me that when the world is back up and running, the Saga share price may take off. The combination of new sales from the cruise business, as well as growth in existing divisions, could provide some significant growth tailwinds. Growth tailwinds It’s difficult for me to predict, at this stage, what sort of growth the company will be able to achieve going forward. However, City analysts reckon the firm will report earnings per share of 37p for its 2022 financial year. Compared to the current stock price of 300p, this suggests the shares look cheap at current levels. That being said, there’s no guarantee the company will hit analysts’ projections. A lot could go wrong between now and 2022. However, I think the predictions clearly show the Saga share price’s potential. In the best-case scenario, analysts reckon the group could earn up to 70p per share for 2022. Either way, it seems to me as if the stock is deeply undervalued at current levels and offers a wide margin of safety. That’s why I’m considering the investment for my portfolio today. In the base-case scenario, the stock looks cheap, and in the best-case scenario, it looks even cheaper. Based on these projections, I think the Saga share price offers an attractive risk-reward profile. That’s exactly what I’m looking for when making an investment — the potential for large capital gains and minimal risk of loss at the same time.
21/11/2020
09:53
samsung2020: Agree, some decent points listed below as well as post from Imatsu (443). I personally feel another offer could come in and that's what will see the next super jump. Realistically until bookings start and actual holidaying commence it will all remain a big 'What If...' the Covid vaccines could yet see more twist n turns so I am not banking on just that yet...I totally agree with points in post 443. I am example of someone who bought at 18p after the last offer news in September, Pre placing I doubled my holding buying at 12p to lower my overall holdings, I hold circa £30k in Saga overall and to be fair it's probably one of my smallest holdings in my portfolio. I was quite happy just sitting on it until something happened, wasn't in truth even monitoring this stock until this week again. hopefully though the share price can stabilise and kick on. My biggest holding by some margin is in Amigo and many parallels between them and Saga - until they don't start lending the share price isn't going anywhere anytime fast, until Saga don't get ships operating and insurances profitable this won't rocket.DYOR folks and good luck.
19/11/2020
18:43
koetser: from stockopedia: Saga (LON:SAGA) (I hold) - this was yesterday's biggest market riser, up 34%. What fuelled this? The only company news was that the second largest shareholder had slightly reduced their position, if anything slightly bearish. Yet it rose substantially, on another high volume day. I was searching for reasons for this (apart from it being very cheap, in my view), and the most likely reasons seem to be; Positive vaccine news, in particular Pfizer saying its covid vaccine seems to be 94% effective in the over-65s. Saga of course provides insurance and holidays for the over-50s. Therefore the market seems to have twigged the rather obvious point that, with the elderly being vaccinated first, and having a penchant for cruising, then this should be good news for Saga's 2 brand new cruise ships possibly being able to generate lots of cash (they're heavily pre-booked already), perhaps from (at a guess), April or May 2021? That would transform Saga's profits and cashflow for the better. I see broker forecasts seem to have been updated, and Stockopedia is now showing a forward PER of 9.3 - based on forecast EPS of 37p in FY 01/2022. I'm working on the basis that the potential for the year after is a good bit more than that - just getting back to historic profitability, it achieved c.180p EPS in the three years from 2016-18, could drive a far larger re-rating. We need to adjust for the share count doubling this year, on the refinancing which brought back former CEO & the founder's son, Roger De Haan, who put in £100m of his own money, most of it at 405p per share in new money. Therefore I think a sensible longer term target, is c.100p EPS. Put that on a PER of 12, which I think is reasonable (cheap, even) , and my share price target, long term, is 1200p per share. Hence I'm still a buyer, not a seller. This is now my 2nd largest position, as I bought a lot more yesterday morning, and am not planning on selling any for the foreseeable future. Looking at the chat on bulletin boards, it seems that many punters are working on similar figures to me. If you think a share is worth 1200p, longer term, then you're not going to quibble about paying 250p or 270p, as the potential upside, if things go well, is so large. As always, there's a risk that things may not go well. Buying shares is after all, really trying to predict the future. i've noticed that there seem to be a lot of people pursuing momentum strategies - ie. once a share starts rising, that seems to pull in more buyers, in a virtuous circle. The only problem with that, is that traders also tend to stampede for the exit at the same time, so today's big rise could be tomorrow's big fall. I wonder if we might see a pullback today, as the futures are indicating a down day. Who cares! I try not to let short term considerations alter my view of the fundamentals.
12/11/2020
20:37
fjgooner: @post 3721. Of course. You are trying to derive a numerical value (in this case a divisor of 8.1) that can be meaningfully applied to the value of a share price to make comparisons between 2 states of an entity (here, Saga) across a period of transition. The transition in this case includes 3 elements: 1. a net cash injection of £140 Million into the business at the rights issue; 2. a share dilution expressed as the issuance of new shares at the rights issue; 3. a 15:1 consolidation, that has no valuation implication, in this same period. Your derivation only considers transition points 2 and 3. As a result, no weighting is included in the calculation that properly acknowledges transition point 1. And so you are comparing apples and pears. So your: 1,122,003,328/139,594,769 = 8.1 is nonsense - it is meaningless. The 1,122,003,328 was the number of pre-rights shares in issue, when Saga did not benefit from the £140 Million cash added to its books. The 139,594,769 is the number of post-rights, post-consolidation shares in issue, when Saga does benefit from the £140 Million cash added to its books. Those 2 sets of shares relate to utterly differently valued entities.
10/11/2020
08:22
city chappy: SAGA share price should easily breach 200p+ this week, £6+ this month, then back to £15+ in the new year. As already said, Roger de Haan back in control and just invested £100m of his own money into new shares, which is a huge vote of confidence. SAGA cruises set to resume in Q2 2021, which add £80m pa EBITDA to the balance sheet.
09/11/2020
21:15
tell sid: RdH back in charge and invested £100m of his own money at a premium price into the recent fund raise, debt reduced, vaccines coming, cruises resume next year, £15+ Saga share price potential again.
Saga share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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