Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Lloyds Banking Group LSE:LLOY London Ordinary Share GB0008706128 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.01p +0.01% 71.79p 71.79p 71.81p 72.47p 71.75p 72.24p 129,858,368 16:35:18
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 39,611.0 4,238.0 2.9 24.8 51,547.90

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Date Time Title Posts
22/5/201721:45Black Beauty: A Recovering Quadruped200,034
22/5/201700:05LLOYDS - A RISING STAR IN THE FINANCIAL WORLD!!!21,240
18/5/201715:10 LLOYDS_2010 after the BIG CRASH105
29/4/201714:48 LLOYDS and the BIG CRASH 2008/091,033
18/4/201708:59Banks - Ye Olde Nag best of a bad bunch?114,089

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Lloyds (LLOY) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
2017-05-22 16:08:4171.8616,88812,135.58NT
2017-05-22 16:05:3372.0461,44144,261.60NT
2017-05-22 16:05:3371.84183,244131,641.06NT
2017-05-22 16:05:3371.84352,340253,118.32NT
2017-05-22 16:05:3272.0419,26013,874.75NT
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Lloyds (LLOY) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
22/5/2017
09:20
Lloyds Daily Update: Lloyds Banking Group is listed in the Banks sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker LLOY. The last closing price for Lloyds was 71.78p.
Lloyds Banking Group has a 4 week average price of 65.22p and a 12 week average price of 61.81p.
The 1 year high share price is 74p while the 1 year low share price is currently 47.10p.
There are currently 71,803,735,370 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 228,494,554 shares. The market capitalisation of Lloyds Banking Group is £51,547,901,622.12.
18/4/2017
10:53
utyinv: gswredland, I posted it for you all on Sat:- Questor: why is Lloyds Banking Group's share price going nowhere? Lloyds Banking Group has many passionate devotees - it's consistently one of the most watched and purchased stocks among private investors, according to the biggest brokers - and yet its share price persistently disappoints. Why? Questor bought Lloyds for this portfolio on December 9 at 62p. It's a bank with a simple business model, a visible and improving capital position and a highly attractive yield (if the forecast 5.3p 2018 dividend is met, buying at today's price gives a yield of about 9pc). The multi-billion insurance mis-selling scandal is behind it. The Government's gradual disposal of its bail-out stake, which may have weighed on the share price hitherto, will reach an end within weeks. Add to this the likelihood that a wider rate increase will raise margins - as, hopefully, will the bank's push into more profitable credit card and loan business. And then there is a commitment to substantial costcutting (more on that below). Why then the languishing share price? Here are some possible answers to the riddle - and our further justification as to why Lloyds remains excellent value. Brexit and domestic exposure Institutional and overseas investors remain sellers of companies perceived to be British-focused, and Lloyds is a likely sufferer. Over the past 12 months Lloyds is down around 10pc compared to a 38pc rise in Standard Chartered. HSBC is up over 40pc (scroll down for price graphs). Both the latter are wired into emerging markets. Institutional money buying into a global recovery story would prefer them to the parochial Lloyds, especially if high yield is not a requirement. Ian Wells, of Kames Capital, said: "There are investors who take a view of the UK that it's going to get worse. They perceive businesses like Lloyds to be proxies for the domestic economy and they're selling." Mr Wells cites insurers Aviva and Legal & General (another holding in Questor's Income Portfolio) as suffering similar treatment. He has been adding to positions in both Lloyds and Aviva in his role as joint manager of the £55m Kames UK Equity Income portfolio. House prices Recent house price data indicate a weakening market. Yesterday the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors reported that the number of properties listed for sale was at an all-time low. Last week Halifax (a division of Lloyds) said annual price growth, at 3.8pc, was the lowest in four years, and that prices had flatlined since February. Rival lender Nationwide's measures showed an outright decline in prices for March, the largest such fall for five years. Dramatic headlines on the back of this data has taken a toll on builders' and lenders' shares. Lloyds's loan books are attractive in terms of loan-to-value and after years of growth, modest declines in house prices won't hurt. Where they could cause harm though is in crushing buyer confidence at a time when loan growth is modest and competition fierce. Demand for housing outside of London's higher price-bands remains strong and under-supply remains a problem in most regions. It is not at all clear that a decline in price growth will turn into a protracted fall. Reasons for cheer: better to be a shareholder than a customer Let's take a gloomy outlook. Assume for instance that regulatory and other factors impede Lloyds's expansion into higher-margin unsecured lending; and that homeowners' confidence wilts, slowing loan growth. Lloyds has already committed to cost-cuts - but this bleaker scenario would up the pressure. There is plenty of scope. First, depositors' interest could be cut. On average 17pc of depositors' cash lodged at major British banks earns nothing. At Lloyds, only 11p per £1 earns nothing, compared to 23p per £1 at Barclays (UBS figures published in February). It's hardly a customerfriendly move, but clearly Lloyds has some scope to pay savers less. Second, Lloyds has plenty of opportunity to shut branches. Its 2008 HBoS takeover saddled it with a vast network with much overlapping. Its total 2,200 branches compare with Barclays's 1,500, for instance. UBS's analysis finds that "broadly 35pc of retail costs are in the network" and reckons Lloyds has by far the biggest window for cuts, with "a saving of up to 22pc of pre-tax profits." Axing branches is hardly popular. But campaigns to maintain costly networks, once championed by MPs and local celebrities, are dying in the face of genuinely changing usage. In due course the market will appreciate these advantages. For now, it's a strong hold. This portfolio is fully invested. Others might wish to top up.
14/4/2017
09:55
utyinv: Kulvinder: Article Questor: why is Lloyds Banking Group's share price going nowhere? Lloyds Banking Group has many passionate devotees - it's consistently one of the most watched and purchased stocks among private investors, according to the biggest brokers - and yet its share price persistently disappoints. Why? Questor bought Lloyds for this portfolio on December 9 at 62p. It's a bank with a simple business model, a visible and improving capital position and a highly attractive yield (if the forecast 5.3p 2018 dividend is met, buying at today's price gives a yield of about 9pc). The multi-billion insurance mis-selling scandal is behind it. The Government's gradual disposal of its bail-out stake, which may have weighed on the share price hitherto, will reach an end within weeks. Add to this the likelihood that a wider rate increase will raise margins - as, hopefully, will the bank's push into more profitable credit card and loan business. And then there is a commitment to substantial costcutting (more on that below). Why then the languishing share price? Here are some possible answers to the riddle - and our further justification as to why Lloyds remains excellent value. Brexit and domestic exposure Institutional and overseas investors remain sellers of companies perceived to be British-focused, and Lloyds is a likely sufferer. Over the past 12 months Lloyds is down around 10pc compared to a 38pc rise in Standard Chartered. HSBC is up over 40pc (scroll down for price graphs). Both the latter are wired into emerging markets. Institutional money buying into a global recovery story would prefer them to the parochial Lloyds, especially if high yield is not a requirement. Ian Wells, of Kames Capital, said: "There are investors who take a view of the UK that it's going to get worse. They perceive businesses like Lloyds to be proxies for the domestic economy and they're selling." Mr Wells cites insurers Aviva and Legal & General (another holding in Questor's Income Portfolio) as suffering similar treatment. He has been adding to positions in both Lloyds and Aviva in his role as joint manager of the £55m Kames UK Equity Income portfolio. House prices Recent house price data indicate a weakening market. Yesterday the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors reported that the number of properties listed for sale was at an all-time low. Last week Halifax (a division of Lloyds) said annual price growth, at 3.8pc, was the lowest in four years, and that prices had flatlined since February. Rival lender Nationwide's measures showed an outright decline in prices for March, the largest such fall for five years. Dramatic headlines on the back of this data has taken a toll on builders' and lenders' shares. Lloyds's loan books are attractive in terms of loan-to-value and after years of growth, modest declines in house prices won't hurt. Where they could cause harm though is in crushing buyer confidence at a time when loan growth is modest and competition fierce. Demand for housing outside of London's higher price-bands remains strong and under-supply remains a problem in most regions. It is not at all clear that a decline in price growth will turn into a protracted fall. Reasons for cheer: better to be a shareholder than a customer Let's take a gloomy outlook. Assume for instance that regulatory and other factors impede Lloyds's expansion into higher-margin unsecured lending; and that homeowners' confidence wilts, slowing loan growth. Lloyds has already committed to cost-cuts - but this bleaker scenario would up the pressure. There is plenty of scope. First, depositors' interest could be cut. On average 17pc of depositors' cash lodged at major British banks earns nothing. At Lloyds, only 11p per £1 earns nothing, compared to 23p per £1 at Barclays (UBS figures published in February). It's hardly a customerfriendly move, but clearly Lloyds has some scope to pay savers less. Second, Lloyds has plenty of opportunity to shut branches. Its 2008 HBoS takeover saddled it with a vast network with much overlapping. Its total 2,200 branches compare with Barclays's 1,500, for instance. UBS's analysis finds that "broadly 35pc of retail costs are in the network" and reckons Lloyds has by far the biggest window for cuts, with "a saving of up to 22pc of pre-tax profits." Axing branches is hardly popular. But campaigns to maintain costly networks, once championed by MPs and local celebrities, are dying in the face of genuinely changing usage. In due course the market will appreciate these advantages. For now, it's a strong hold. This portfolio is fully invested. Others might wish to top up.
11/4/2017
12:49
sux_2bu: The Lloyds Banking Group PLC (LON:LLOY) (LLOY.L) share price has risen 1% in 2017 so far. That’s behind the share prices of financial services peers Prudential plc (LON:PRU) (PRU.L), HSBC Holdings plc (LON:HSBA) (HSBA.L) and Standard Chartered PLC (LON:STAN) (STAN.L). HSBC is 1% higher, Standard Chartered has gained 11% and Prudential is 3% up. However, I think Lloyds could perform relatively well in future. I feel its strategy has been successful in the last few years and could continue to be so in future. For instance, it has been able to cut costs to a greater extent than many of its banking peers, with its cost/income ratio now one of the most appealing in the sector. It has also improved its balance sheet strength, with its performance in the stress tests being relatively strong. I’m also of the view that Lloyds could register improved share price performance because of its low valuation. It has a P/E of approximately 10, which I believe indicates its shares are undervalued. Although the bank faces an uncertain future and lacks the international exposure or growth potential of Prudential, Standard Chartered and HSBC, I think its share price indicates there is a large margin of safety on offer. I’m also of the opinion that for long-term investors, Brexit potentially presents an opportunity to buy shares at relatively low prices. For me, short-term volatility is not a big concern, as I invest for multi-year periods. So, if Lloyds does experience some difficulties in future months, it would not be a concern for me as long as its long-term prospects are bright. While I’m upbeat about the opportunities in Asia for HSBC, Prudential and Standard Chartered, I feel the Lloyds share price is undervalued. Therefore, while riskier than many of its peers due to its reliance on the UK economy, I think it could be a relatively strong performer in the long run.
05/3/2017
17:19
mr.elbee: "Anyway it's almost over now and no longer a determinant on development of LLOY share price" Sorry to burst your complacency raffles, but that is NOt how Butler sees it...and a two year campaign will keep a firm lid on the share price 1 in 5...4/5 to go a quadrupling..
05/3/2017
09:55
raffles the gentleman thug: Nothing new though - pretty much same with asbestosis claims - where average claim in US was $6k and it was cheaper to pay than contest. But last time I looked uphold rate on PPI was 48% or soAnyway it's almost over now and no longer a determinant on development of LLOY share price
03/3/2017
16:51
raffles the gentleman thug: Well one might argue the Government so far has had a negligible impact on the LLOY share price given its risen from 54p to over 68p whilst they have been working 15% of daily volume
28/2/2017
02:40
jasonblue66: Lloyds share price: UBS points to improved outlook for bailed-out lender UBS has named Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) as one of its "top picks in the European banking sector," lifting its earnings forecasts amid an improved outlook for the bailed-out lender. The move came after the FTSE 100 bank, part owned by the UK government, updated investors on its full-year performance last year, revealing that its profit had more than doubled in 2016.Lloyds' share price has been steady in London in today's session, having inched 0.09 percent higher to 69.34p as of 14:21 GMT, slightly outperforming the benchmark FTSE 100 index which currently stands at 7,243.41 points, flat in percentage terms. The group's shares have added more than 11 percent so far this year, as compared with a 1.4-percent gain in the Footsie.UBS, which rates Lloyds as a 'buy,' lifted its price target on the stock from 75p to 80p today, and said that the stock was one of its "top picks in the European banking sector". Proactive Investors quoted the analysts as pointing out that the FTSE 100 group's adjusted profit before tax for the final quarter of 2016 was nine percent ahead of consensus, with "better-than-expected income, costs and loan losses."As a result of the 'improved outlook', the broker lifted its adjusted earnings per share forecasts for 2017 and 2018 by 11-13 percent, while near-term dividend per share expectations have been increased by 18-30 percent.UBS further argues that with Brexit on the horizon, the bailed-out lender is well-placed to mitigate any fallout from negotiations."With the UK due to embark on EU exit negotiations in due course, we prize Lloyds' highly collateralised loan portfolio and flexibility to manage funding costs and opex to deliver strong returns and capital to shareholders," the Swiss bank pointed out, as quoted by Proactive Investors.The 22 analysts offering 12-month price targets for Lloyds for the Financial Times have a median target of 75.00p, with a high estimate of 93.00p and a low estimate of 40.00p. As of February 25, the consensus forecast amongst 28 polled investment analysts covering the bailed-out lender has it that the company will outperform the market.As of 14:56 GMT, Monday, 27 February, Lloyds Banking Group share price is 69.31p.
28/2/2017
02:37
jasonblue66: by Tsveta ZikolovaThursday, 23 Feb 2017, 08:10 GMTLloyds share price: Government moves to trim stake after group's results The Treasury has trimmed its holding in Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) further, with the latest sale bringing the taxpayer's interest in the bailed-out lender to below four percent. The government has taken advantage of yesterday's rise in Lloyds' shares, prompted by the bank's full-year results.Lloyds' share price soared in the previous session, adding 4.39 percent to close at 69.70p. The shares have gained more than 11 percent over the past year, but continue to trade below the government's break-even price of 73.6p.The Treasury announced in a statement this morning that it had sold more shares in Lloyds via its pre-arranged trading plan, taking its stake into the bailed-out lender to just under four percent. The government noted that the latest sale meant that the Treasury had recovered £19 billion of the £20.3 billion taxpayers injected into the bank during the financial crisis."Lloyds' strong annual results show that we are in a good position to continue to reduce our shareholding and recover all of the money the tax-payer injected into the bank during the financial crisis," Economic Secretary to the Treasury, Simon Kirby, commented in the statement.The sale followed Lloyds' results yesterday when the bank revealed that its reported profit had more than doubled in 2016. The bank further announced that it would distribute both an ordinary and a special dividend.Analysts have hailed the results, with RBC Capital markets noting that the group had brightened the sector with full year pre-tax profits of £4 billion. Sharecast quoted the broker as pointing out that the lender's capital and dividend strength was a 'key attraction' for investors.Shore Capital meanwhile commented that Lloyds' results justified its faith in the bank as an income stock."We therefore remain positive on Lloyds' shares, viewing them as being attractively valued compared to its large quoted banking peers and also continue to view the name as a core holding for income funds seeking exposure to the banking sector," the broker's analyst Gary Greenwood said, as quoted by Citywire.As of 08:11 GMT, Thursday, 23 February, Lloyds Banking Group share price is 70.35p. NEXT
24/2/2017
14:37
smartypants: robwt I have been posting in pictures because it seems that "people" on here find it hard to understand the written word... but, just for you I will try to explain my point...again AS simply as I can.. So you have LLOY shares, you are waiting 6 weeks(?) to receive a div payment of 2.2p Is that correct?, I will assume yes Yesterday LLOY share price reached 71p (70.5p most of morning) You did not sell them, you are waiting to receive 2.2p for every share you hold, paid in 6 weeks.... are you still with me, forgive me for posting things you may already know.. LLOY share price is now..let me check...68.5p SO... from high of 71p (that you didn't sell at), to 68.5p, the difference is ? Shall we wait for jack to work it out ? 2.5p by not selling at yesterdays high, you have already lost more than the div is going to pay you, and you still have to wait 6 weeks !!! Spot the Muppet ?
04/10/2016
14:05
allinhope: Watching lloy share price is somewhat tiresome given the daily ups and downs in comparison to the 100 and peer banks. I know this is how the market operates but for some reason, as a lloy shareholder I can help feeling as there is something odd about lloy share movements. Thoughts anyone.
Lloyds share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
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