Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Land Securities Group LSE:LAND London Ordinary Share GB00BYW0PQ60 ORD 10 2/3P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 920.00p 921.50p 922.00p - - - 0 05:30:33
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Real Estate Investment Trusts 753.0 406.0 -32.9 - 6,821.43

Land Securities Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1101 to 1125 of 1125 messages
Chat Pages: 45  44  43  42  41  40  39  38  37  36  35  34  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
14/8/2018
18:50
I agree with everything you said the problem for investors is will the fall in the share price continue, what is the correct discount to NAV. I’m sure the NAV has fallen since the year end but equally the discount must have risen, and where will it settle 35 or 40% seems over the top to me but I’m a shareholder so would say that, compared to other REIT Land and BLand discount seems to be on the high side. The Brecht problem won’t be settled soon unfortunately
sun1950
14/8/2018
15:53
It's the same on everything UK focussed. Property, banks, insurance, brewing. Construction and housebuilding are doing a little better, but they seem to be joining in over the last few weeks. Doesn't make any sense to me. Unemployment falling, real wages rising, inflation steady, government borrowing falling, all the services, manufacturing and construction PMI's are between 54-56. Markets seem now to be betting on a disorderly Brexit. Can't see anything changing until we get some news either way. You can see it in the exchange rate. Pound is getting pummelled. I'm beginning to think we must now be at the point where the markets would respond positively to any decision. They hate uncertainty.
cc2014
14/8/2018
15:29
Where is the bottom for this share and Bland
sun1950
31/7/2018
08:40
Land is going to absolutely multi bag soon. It’s spending share holders money where it matters and the market will always reward brilliant investment decisions: https://www.standard.co.uk/business/british-land-boss-wants-more-diversity-to-mend-mistakes-a3879176.html
ball deap
30/7/2018
21:03
Not good to make such assumptions. My LAND holding is up 80% odd having held for some time. Reasonable yield as well. EU matters notwithstanding LAND is a solid enough business.
patientcapital
30/7/2018
13:25
took my first punt on my assumption that BREXIT 'aint gonna happen today. Topped up with Land.
careful
17/7/2018
06:25
Land Securities (LAND) Earnings-Reaction to Keep an Eye http://crweworld.com/Earnings-Calendar
danieldanj
13/7/2018
10:36
Q1 dividend up 15%. If that translates to full year then yielding over 5% now (with 32% discount to NAV).
hugepants
21/6/2018
22:44
This is another one, I have a friend who was at the swimming pool yesterday and bumped into a old friend. Now, apparently everyone at London’s mosques are upbeat about upward momentum on LAND ticker. Why so interesting in this tickers? Anyone know? This ticker will multi multi multi bag so I should think with big interest yes.
ball deap
12/6/2018
15:06
There’s never been a better time for British Landsec - HTTPS://www.propertyweek.com/leader/theres-never-been-a-better-time-for-british-landsec/5096863.article OK, so it’s not a new topic of conversation, but it’s one of the property industry’s most intriguing ones, and I make no apology for returning to it. Over the past 25 years, I have interviewed every chief executive of both British Land and Landsec – from Landsec’s Sir Peter Hunt and British Land’s Sir John Ritblat to Rob Noel and Chris Grigg today. But during that quarter of a century, not one of them has given me a straight answer to the straight question: when will the two of you merge? Last week, I got my chance to put the question, for the umpteenth time, to Grigg. On previous occasions, he did what all the others had done and knocked me back with some adept media training techniques. I was so accustomed to the non-answers that I was half way through my next question before it clicked. Grigg said something different this time. He did not hit the ball back across the net with a tonne of spin. Let’s not get over-excited. Grigg did not say he was in talks with Noel to create a £14bn property giant. Far from it. But he did say that if it made sense for shareholders, British Land would “seriously consider” it. Well, that’s something – and ‘British Landsec’ makes more sense now than it ever has. Even the maths add up. Now is one of those rare occasions when it would be a genuine merger of equals. Landsec has fallen from its £10bn market value a couple of years back, while British Land has enjoyed a decent period in comparison. Both companies are valued at nearly £7bn. There would be no senior partner in the talks. The firms’ respective portfolios also continue to fit. Landsec may have improved its presence in the City of London, but British Land trumps it there. Likewise, Landsec dominates in the West End, where British Land has grown, but not to an extent to rival Landsec. On retail, where Landsec has been hurt by overpaying for Bluewater and British Land has remained stable, getting together could protect the merged company in property’s most volatile arena. When it comes to the trendy sectors of flexible workspace and build-to-rent, Noel could learn a thing or two from Grigg. In other words, while each firm has become more like the other, they also cancel out each other’s weaknesses. There’s one more element to my gossipmongering. Both Grigg and Noel have been in their jobs for a long time (nine and seven years respectively). Surely there’s no better legacy for either of them to leave than British Landsec? It would be a UK property company that could, for the first time, genuinely compete on a global stage. They would form a company with a portfolio value approaching £30bn, and an equity base that would propel British Landsec towards becoming a top 25 global REIT. Marriage of convenience However, any merger would be a defensive play and while the market has long called for it, now may not be the time to force through such a marriage of convenience. Hammerson’s failed attempt to buy intu earlier this year certainly does not inspire much confidence. But Grigg, the only boss of either firm to get even close to answering my favourite question, has got me thinking. Perhaps. Just perhaps.
speedsgh
10/6/2018
23:36
I get the impression LAND are being more conservative in their valuations. They valued their portfolio flat whereas BLND upvalued theirs by a few percent.
hugepants
07/6/2018
12:24
Thanks for feedback. Will take a closer look at BLND as a comparator with LAND. Being naturally conservative (with a small 'c') in nature, the cautious approach being taken by LAND (reduced speculative development, defensive balance sheet/reduced gearing) appeals to me. Just need to satisfy myself on sustainability through the cycle; recent history (GFC) does not read well - div has still not got back to where it was in 2008 - but question is whether the lessons have been learned. B/S & cautious approach being taken suggests it may have been. Having said that no two recessions are exactly the same so just comparing with GFC is not necessarily a useful exercise.
speedsgh
07/6/2018
11:55
I like their "mixed use" concept: office, retail, leisure on one site. They seem rather more upbeat, but that in itself needn't be a good thing!
jonwig
07/6/2018
11:22
Thanks, jonwig. Only just started looking at LAND, ironically after I had watched the Merchants Trust AGM presentation by Simon Gergel. Haven't compared with BLND yet. Can I ask what made you come down in favour of BLND?
speedsgh
07/6/2018
11:05
speeds - here it is.I agonised for days on whether to buy LAND or BLND. I plumped for BLND, but it was a close judgment. Property stocks have featured heavily among Questor’s recent tips and we make no apology for it: the companies recommended have offered robust business models along with valuations depressed by an excess of pessimism over the likely effects of Brexit, among other things. This week we feature another: Land Securities, one of the giants of the British commercial property market, whose assets include office space in the City of London and hotels and shopping centres around the country. Chief among its attractions, according to Simon Gergel, who last year bought a stake in the firm for the Merchants Investment Trust, is the 33pc discount at which the shares trade relative to the value of LandSec’s assets. Gergel acknowledged that investors were nervous about City office space because of the possible impact of Brexit on financial services and about retail property because of the rise of online shopping. But he described the level of LandSec’s discount as “extraordinary” in view of the “cautious̶1; stance adopted by the company to ride out the current uncertainty. This caution includes avoiding speculative development and restructuring the company’s debt so that it matures later and costs less, Gergel told Questor. The moratorium on speculative building means that almost all of its property is let, typically on long-term contracts, so the company’s income is highly secure. In fact it is on course to grow slightly as certain lettings “bed in” and introductory rent-free periods come to an end. The company should also be able to increase rental income to some extent via “non-speculative” development, which means, for example, building more space for a tenant that wants to expand. Read Questor’s rules of investment before you follow our tips. See Questor's tips every day at twitter.com/DTquestor Gergel added that prime shopping centres, such as LandSec’s Bluewater in Kent or Westgate in Oxford, “should benefit from trade concentrating in the best venues”. He said the “real risk” was falling property values and that the current large gap between the share price and the value of the company’s assets reflected a “lack of trust” in the stated asset values. But he pointed out that many property transactions had taken place “at prices in line with current valuations” and added: “Even if values did fall by say 10pc, we would expect the discount to shrink as investors sensed the bottom of the cycle. The shares are priced for a very harsh environment – the market is too pessimistic. All it needs for the discount to narrow would be for conditions to carry on as they are without disaster. There doesn’t need to be a positive catalyst.” Gergel concluded: “There is absolute value here, not just relative to the stock market.”
jonwig
07/6/2018
10:55
phil - I don't subscribe (am with one of the other national newspapers). Are you or someone else able to post a copy of the text? TIA
speedsgh
06/6/2018
23:52
Questor: buy Land Securities – it has battened down the hatches but 33pc discount remains https://www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/questor-share-tip-buy-land-securities/
philanderer
22/5/2018
20:05
Would agree with thst, the LAND statement appeared more cautious which did not help sentiment. If markets ever have a rough few weeks(no sign atm) this is an add for me.
essentialinvestor
22/5/2018
20:01
Funny how BLND results were so upbeat yet LAND's were downbeat. At first glance they seem very similar with their high exposure to London especially London offices. Over the last 2 years LAND is down 20%. BLND is only down 10%. I reckon LAND is the better value. Discount to NAV is over 30% and yield approx 4.5%.
hugepants
01/5/2018
10:55
Very encouraging to see blue-blooded JPM Caz REITERATING their OVERWEIGHT Recommendation last month with an UNCHANGED TARGET PRICE of 1200p. JPM Caz still see 20% UPSIDE to today's price. The strong, resilient and optimistic November half-year results are worth reading again. Share has moved ahead and recovered strongly recently. Looks like £10 will soon be breached. ALL IMO. DYOR. QP
quepassa
19/3/2018
10:20
yes it does signal that yet again foreign companies value UK assets much higher than we do on this market. discounts are far too big in reality but WTFDIKA
ntv
19/3/2018
08:31
Different sector but absolutely yes! Fascinating that Klepierre clearly don't fear Brexit with Hammerson approach. Does this approach for Hammerson put down a marker that we are at or near bottom of commercial property cycle. ALL IMO. DYOR. QP
quepassa
15/3/2018
09:11
if they hadn't returned all that cash to shareholders they could have bought some cheap stock back when it hits £7.50
ntv
15/3/2018
09:09
look at the charts share price was higher 20 years ago
ntv
06/3/2018
17:30
Exactly. Retail is a tough place to be. Commercial property/warehousing going great guns - see the performance of Segro (the old Slough Estates). Happy enough with prime London office space and continue to hold (and occasionally buy) LandSecs. ALL IMO. DYOR. QP
quepassa
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