Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Kier Group Plc LSE:KIE London Ordinary Share GB0004915632 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.60 0.53% 114.40 961,345 16:35:15
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
113.80 114.40 115.00 110.40 110.40
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Construction & Materials 3,422.50 -225.30 -168.90 185
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:04:33 O 3,983 114.406 GBX

Kier (KIE) Latest News

More Kier News
Kier Investors    Kier Takeover Rumours

Kier (KIE) Discussions and Chat

Kier Forums and Chat

Date Time Title Posts
13/6/202116:08Kier Group 2005 - The Building Business22,091
04/6/202116:26Kier Group 8
02/6/202113:07Inflation and material shortage 12
28/5/202106:48Rights issue24
22/4/202111:01Forthcoming Rights issue-

Add a New Thread

Kier (KIE) Most Recent Trades

No Trades
Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
View all Kier trades in real-time

Kier (KIE) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
13/6/2021
09:20
Kier Daily Update: Kier Group Plc is listed in the Construction & Materials sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker KIE. The last closing price for Kier was 113.80p.
Kier Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 108.80p and a 12 week average price of 78.50p.
The 1 year high share price is 123.20p while the 1 year low share price is currently 42.90p.
There are currently 162,115,870 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 1,103,489 shares. The market capitalisation of Kier Group Plc is £185,460,555.28.
04/6/2021
08:33
stdyeddy: errr... wolly, you surely must've noticed that Kier has trebled since November. A 300% increase in seven months. You are the one who is clueless, constantly saying that black is white. Your predictions have proven to be completely wrong here for seven months. You should really give up trying to be an 'expert'. Anyone can see that you're actually just an attention seeking nutjob. Btw, I don't give people 'tips'. That's everyone else's job. 😊 The worst thing about you though wolly, is that your motives are dishonest. Constantly lying about your positions, gulling people into giving up their shares while saying how certain you are that Kier won't go over £1 and that you'll apologise to everyone if it does, and then reneging on that very public promise. And constantly calling all the investors on here 'paid rampers' to try and justify your dishonesty. You lie so frequently and so glibly that no one here believes anything you say. As for finding 'one problem with your points', you have been contradicted, corrected and proven wrong a million times on here but you just ignore our points and constantly repeat your mantra of 'kier is doomed'. Everyone here presents 'points' that are positive and negative for Kier, but you only misrepresent and lie. That's why I and others confront you and call you a liar. You're not being attacked. We are merely upholding the truth. And btw, the regulars here all agreed in 2019 that it would take Kier two years to drag itself out of the hole. We have been patient, and Kier's time has come. The next seven months are likely to see big increases in the Kier share price, especially after year-end and January/February's H1 reporting when the market re-rates Kier's prospects. You conveniently forget that Kier's share price was around 1200p about 2.5 years back. It won't go that high with more shares in issue but £3-£4 is within reach in my view.
20/5/2021
14:07
wallywoo: On the 23rd October 20 (approximately 3 months after the equity issue), Costain's share price was 38.3p. So as I said it fell back 21.7p from the equity issue price (36.6 percent 21.7 /60 X 100). If the same happened here the share price would be 85 X 63.4/100= 53.89p. This is the likely Kier share price around October 21. Please get your facts right, Stdy. We all know how you like to manipulate the truth!!! But you are right about the issue being larger, it is more similar to Kier than I thought, Costain issue was for 166.7m shares when there were 108m (154 percent). So this is still smaller but quite similar. A very good example of what to expect. Thanks for that.!!
20/5/2021
13:51
stdyeddy: So wolly, now that you've spewed your little fiction onto this thread, you're offering to 'shut up' if no one will contradict you? Well, I've just checked the share price action for Costain during cash-raise from 6th May 2020, the day before the launch, to mid-June 2020 two weeks after all the new shares began trading (masturpig might be an interesting source here since he participated -- I can't believe I've typed those words!!) and as usual, you're telling nothing but lies!!! Practically everything you've written there is false -- once again you are merely hoping that no one will check. Costain issued 153% more shares, NOT 35%! The rest from you is also rubbish. Closing prices 6th May, 70p (day before the cash-raise is launched) 7th May, 75p (day cash-raise is launched) NOT 80p as you claim wolly The price then ROSE to 82p on the ex-entitlement day And post ex-entitlement when the share price will have rebased to take account of the open offer 'rights' (bear in mind that shareholders were diluted more than Kier shareholders at this point, at almost 50% -- masturpig? Is that right -- am surprised it's so much) found a new price of 75p, and dropped only 10% by close on 14th May to 68p. And also keep in mind that this was during the Covid crisis. The new shares started trading on 29th May and the data I'm looking at shows the shareprice DROPPING JUST 4P BEFORE RISING TO 90p by the 8th June. THE TRUTH IS THE ACTUAL OPPOSITE OF THE STORY THAT YOU ARE TRYING TO MISLEAD PEOPLE WITH WOLLY!!! YOU HAVE BEEN FOUND OUT ONCE AGAIN, MERELY BY CHECKING THE ACTUAL FACTS!!!! Since then Costain shares have underperformed Kier, as we have taken great pleasure in pointing out to masturpig at various times, but I would say that Costain's share price performance after June is more obviously a feature of the market and it still has not got anywhere near the lows you're describing.
19/5/2021
11:38
gixxer1: Wally. Whilst I have been in the kie Sharesave Scheme since 2010, you are only in it for a period of 3 years at a time and then you can join the subsequent one at the new share Option Price. Whatever they give you as the Option Price at the start of the 3 years (say 85p) is the price you can buy the shares for at the 3 year point, or withdraw your money without losing. Lets say the Option Price originally offered is 85p and over a 3 year period I save £5000 into it. 5000 divided by 85p (the Option price) is 5882, which means I have 5882 shares at the end of the 3 years. I can then buy 5882 shares at whatever the current share price is. So at todays price of say 111, I have made £1529. If the share price is lower, then I just withdraw my £5k. Not much I know and it will never make you a millionaire, but it is something. And yes I did lose out on the last RI of 409, but on the basis of 'if you are not prepared to lose it, then don't do it', I am ok with that. BTW, I am still a contented kie employee!
15/5/2021
17:10
imastu pidgitaswell: Final point – you keep telling me how I should have invested in KIE and not COST. Because KIE has gone up more than COST. Without doing all that again, and why I prefer to make lower percentage but higher (and safer) absolute returns on COST because I could invest a lot more than would be a reasonable risk on something like this that could have gone bust (and I have banked more than £60k from COST since I first acquired some in April 2020), it’s worth just reverting to what I did do from the bottom of the KIE share price, in November 2020. And I posted it on the SAGA thread at the time – a departure from my usual ‘go large but safe’ strategy. It was the one ‘risky’ company I thought it worth punting on for the post-vaccine recovery (plenty of non-risky companies in the post-vaccine surge – TW. LGEN, HL. and COST in large volumes too - which contributed to the £600k gains): https://uk.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=47190560&from=165 And a comparison between SAGA and KIE (in terms of KIE share price) - from end of October when KIE bottomed; I bought SAGA on 11 and 12 November: free stock charts from uk.advfn.com SAGA has done far better than KIE, and was on a different level until the KIE surge of the past few days. Not too bad for “A POOR INVESTOR AND YOUR "CAUTIOUS APPROACH" GOT YOU NO WHERE” assertion from you. Plus of course the £600k as per the previous post. I’m just showing it to you in in your own words. But it won’t convince you, will it? You remain in your own little bubble of incompetence and self-certainty in the face of the evidence.
13/5/2021
08:44
imastu pidgitaswell: (Updated from the weekend) ...............................Number...........Price.....Market Cap ...................................................£.............£'m Current number of shares..........162............1.00............146 New shares .......................284............0.85............241 New no. of shares / Market Cap....446 So a pro-forma comparison if that happens - assuming 90p for the KIE share price – new and old shares, and taking the forward projection (by COST) for year end cash for COST of £80m (31.12.20 was over £100m) would be: ................................KIE....................COST Share price....................0.90....................0.58 Market Cap .....................401.....................167 Financial Debt at 31.12.20......436 Delayed Tax......................50 Trade Finance...................110 Cash raised....................(229) KL sale....................... (100) Net debt / (cash)...............267.....................(80) Enterprise Value................668......................80 So while KIE’s market cap would be a little over double that of Costain, its Enterprise Value (the cost to a potential acquirer – i.e. debt + market cap) would be over 8 times as high. Very different. Projecting forward earnings: ................................KIE....................COST Turnover......................4,000...................1,200 Margin.........................3.0%....................3.5% PBT.............................120......................42 Tax............................ (30)..... ..............(11) PAT..............................90......................32 Number of shares................446.....................275 EPS(p).........................20.2p...................11.5p Debt post raise ................267.....................(80) M/C post raise..................401.....................160 EV post raise...................668......................80 Number of shares................446.....................275 PE ratio.......................4.46....................4.98 E/V : Profit ratio.............7.42....................2.44 (ratios above using share prices of 90p and 58p respectively) So, just my view – if the assumptions above happen: Very similar earnings ratios would be the picture. Which basically justifies the current share price for KIE. Also noteworthy (I think) that KIE’s enterprise value to profitability ratio will still be nearly 3 times higher than Costain’s. A private equity suitor would certainly be noting that, even if the stock market doesn’t (yet).
12/5/2021
13:53
stdyeddy: To put some real-world context on this, let's put some numbers in. wolly-chops used to boast about the size of his trades and how much money he'd 'made' 'shorting' kier. I have the impression that a typical trade for wallz was around £30k. If he had opened a £30k short on Kier at 50p and successively higher values at 58p, the low 80s and the 90s to bring his average price up to 81p (he helpfully gave us new averages each time), he would have a position a little over 12 times his original stake -- around £389k. He would be sitting on a paper loss of around £95k today. The share price is going up despite the fact that the whole world knows that Kier intends to launch an equity raise. My guess is that the raise is seen as a positive and the share price will not drop. Usually equity raises occur on the other side of the share price trajectory, when a firm is going down and successive problems bring the price lower and lower. Kier is on the other side of the curve, having sorted out its problems, written down assets, made redundancies and is now on the recovery slope, going up, so the cash-raise is very-broadly-speaking good news as far as the market is concerned and will be even better news if and when it is successful. So when the cash-raise happens, IF it were a straightforward rights issue -- which it won't be, because there will be a firm placing that excludes private shareholders in all likelihood -- but IF it were an RI with one RI share for every existing share, wallz would find that his £389k short at 81p could suddenly become a £778k short. Any thoughts on this wallo-pops?
12/5/2021
13:27
stdyeddy: Peter; one post in two years? Are you anyone we know already? Regarding wally-plops and his 'short' -- unfortunately the whole thing is a fiction. His presence on this board is a personal vendetta against Kier and the longholders here. As we have all pointed out, anyone holding a genuine short doubled down so frequently as wallzo claims, would now in john's words, be 'telephone numbers offside'. As far as your actual question is concerned, the shorts generally speaking experience the reverse to the longs in a rights issue. When the rights are issued, if the share price remains ABOVE the discounted value of the rights issue share price, the longs have rights that they can sell. Eg, if the discounted rights shares were available to shareholders at say 90p, and the share price was at 110p, you COULD if you really wanted to, sell your rights to the new 'discounted shares' and make 20p a share. Or you can buy the rights issue shares at 90p and have a notional 20p profit on your account (assuming the share price doesn't then slide down). The shorts however, have an immediate LOSS of (in this example) 20p per rights issue share which they can crystallise by closing the rights issue position. In practice, the share price often drops to reflect the discounted shares, and if you're fortunate as a shareholder (long), the drop in the share price does not reach the discounted share price and you don't have a loss overall on your account, if you re-invest in the rights shares. But you have to increase your holding. Shorters face the same kind of double jeopardy; if the share price moves down to the extent that it reflects the discounted value of the shares within the entire shares in issue, then they make money on the existing shares, but lose potentially the same money on the rights issues shares. The only way that shorts can benefit from the RI is if the share price drops below a threshold price which enables them to make more money on the existing shares than they are losing on their obligation to buy the rights issue shares. And if the RI essentially fails and the share price drops below the RI discounted price, the shorts make loadsamoney, on the existing shares and the rights to the new shares. However, if the market responds positively to the RI (as it did recently with DLAR) the shorts lose money on the existing shares and loads more money on the rights. This is the likely situation for wally-plop's shorts, but since they are all in his head, it has no real-world consequence, which is why he is blithely unaware of the danger.
08/5/2021
16:34
stdyeddy: I see a sneaky poster attempting to promote alternative shares on here again. The fact of the matter is that Kier is the market leader in construction and has massive momentum compared to smaller operators. Kier's share price will ultimately reflect this. Two loss-making contracts almost wiped out Costain (for example) -- Kier has already handled much worse and has survived. Banks are onside and will continue to be very supportive, regardless of Davies's decision on the equity-raise, imv. The business has clearly turned a corner and lenders are earning safe money from the UK's largest construction firm. After the equity-raise terms are published, my guess is that the share price will increase by multiples. We have now passed the nadir for Kier's share price and after two years of bad news, I think we will now see many positives coming from the work that Davies's management team has done in positioning the business for recovery, including increasing margin, increasing revenue and cash coming into the business. A key aspect to the equity raise (apart from reducing debt and finance costs) is making the shares attractive again; it's a key performance target for Davies and he has a large bonus-incentive riding on it. Without the cash-raise, it will take Kier three years to achieve a net cash position assuming profits a little below the low end of Davies's recent forecast -- he forecast profit margin of between 3% and 3.5% on turnover between £4bn to £4.5bn; that's £120m to £157.5m. Without new cash, finance costs will put a dent in those earnings of maybe £15m a year. But with a cash injection, Kier might achieve net cash in as little as six months. That could bring the prospect of dividends forward by more than two years. Davies has stated an intention to pay dividends of around one third profits, conceivably £40m+ a year. If the market were to rate the share price on a 4% dividend return (as it has done historically), Kier's market cap would be in the region of £1bn (today's market cap is about one sixth of that value at around £160m). If profits are at the higher end; £52m in dividends and a £1.3bn market cap. A p/e ratio for total earnings is around 18 for the sector. At a p/e of just 15 and profits of £140m, Kier would be valued at £2bn, and if the market rates Kier as the sector leader this would push the market cap even higher. The share will increase in multiples of the current share price and I think few people disagree with this. A key factor on the multiples is the level of dilution from the equity raise. If we are ultimately looking at a £2bn company with twice the current number of shares, perhaps we will see the share price increase only 600%! There is also the potential for more positive surprises; Tempsford Hall had an asking price of around £40m. Regional property has increased in value due to the influence of covid; just £35m from this asset would make a significant dent in the money needed from the equity raise. Another key aspect to the share price dynamic is the very small proportion of available shares. Only 27% of Kier's shares are NOT held by major shareholders. This has enabled much of the volatility in the share price; relatively small trades have moved the share price disproportionately, enabling hedge funds to 'artfully' manipulate the share price down especially in 2019, a significant factor in the sp's low point. Diluting the holdings of the major holders conceivably increases the opportunity for a bid for the entire company. My guess is that the major holders will feel obliged to minimise dilution as much as possible, particularly since Kier has now turned a corner. An investor holding Kier through the last two years of re-structuring is unlikely to meekly give up their holding now that the business is about to reap the rewards. That means that they will take up whatever additional equity is made available, and I'm guessing that this is a key negotiating/directional point with major shareholders, the Kier board and the commercial banks/underwriters for the equity raise. For that reason, I reckon that shareholders will get a good deal in the equity raise AND that it will be massively over-subscribed. We will have the answers soon; we are now more than three weeks into the 'coming weeks' period mentioned by Davies when he discussed the equity raise. We are also only six-and-a-half weeks away from the year-end. Figures are obviously not available the day after the year-end, but last year Davies rushed out an update the very next day on the state of the business. Since Kier managed a £9m profit at this last half-year with the tail-end of two years of exceptional costs from its restructuring and covid expenses, this next half-year could herald a return to normality and possibly a £40m profit. This would be another positive surprise for the market, which has grown used to Kier disappointments rather than successes, evidenced by the current forecast p/e of approximately 1. Just one year's earnings!! Unusually for Kier, we are in a period of frequent newsflow. Put a £40m profit together with the sale of Tempsford Hall and £75m starts to alter the equity raise numbers very significantly. Obviously this is just speculation, but Davies and his team have spent two years turning the great Kier ship around; I think it's entirely possible that positive developments will now begin to balance the disappointments of the previous management team's efforts. But even without new positive outcomes, the stage is already set for a massive recovery at Kier. The business remains the largest UK regional construction firm with a formidable order book and a slimmed down profit-focused workforce. Recent moves in the share price are beginning to reflect this.
08/5/2021
14:15
imastu pidgitaswell: Some updated numbers on Kier and a comparison with COST, to give a valuation perspective: The assumption is they raise £200m at 70% of the current share price – i.e. at 63p (using 90p for current price). This is key as it determines the number of new shares, which impacts Earnings per Share. ...............................Number...........Price.....Market Cap ...................................................£.............£'m Current number of shares..........162............0.9.............146 New shares .......................317............0.63............200 New no. of shares / Market Cap....479............................346 So a pro-forma comparison if that happens - assuming 90p for the KIE share price – new and old shares, and taking the forward projection (by COST) for year end cash for COST of £80m (31.12.20 was over £100m) would be: ................................KIE....................COST Share price....................0.90....................0.60 Market Cap .....................346.....................167 Financial Debt at 31.12.20......436 Delayed Tax......................50 Trade Finance...................110 Cash raised....................(200) KL sale....................... (100) Net debt / (cash)...............296.....................(80) Enterprise Value................642......................87 So while KIE’s market cap would be a little over double that of Costain, its Enterprise Value (the cost to a potential acquirer – i.e. debt + market cap) would be over 7 times as high. Very different. Projecting forward earnings: ................................KIE....................COST Turnover......................4,000...................1,200 Margin.........................3.0%....................3.5% PBT.............................120......................42 Tax............................ (30)..... ..............(11) PAT..............................90......................32 Number of shares................479.....................275 EPS(p).........................18.8p...................11.5p Debt post raise ................296.....................(80) M/C post raise..................346.....................167 EV post raise...................642......................87 Number of shares................479.....................275 PE ratio.......................4.79....................5.29 E/V : Profit ratio.............7.13....................2.75 (ratios above using share prices of 90p and 60p respectively) So, just my view – if the assumptions above happen: Very similar earnings ratios would be the picture. Which basically justifies the current share price for KIE. With the (very) large caveat that they need to complete the money raising. If they do, it’s fairly valued (ignoring the resulting £300m debt - the assumption is that it's manageable.) If they don’t complete the money raising – it may well be over; the banks will not renew the facility. Also noteworthy (I think) that KIE’s enterprise value to profitability ratio would still be nearly 3 times higher than Costain’s. A private equity suitor would certainly be noting that, even if the stock market doesn’t (yet). Being so fat after eating too much popcorn, I’ll be watching. But until there is news and clarity, not investing. Filtering the 3 (1?) musketeer(s) does make for a simpler picture. And I don’t need to bother with the snarling and predictable failure to read or consider anything. Back off filter once there is some news.
Kier share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
KIE
Kier
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20210613 15:42:12