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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Pendragon Plc LSE:PDG London Ordinary Share GB00B1JQBT10 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 13.10 13.12 13.26 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Retailers 4,627.0 -44.4 -3.6 - 185

Pendragon Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3426 to 3448 of 3675 messages
Chat Pages: 147  146  145  144  143  142  141  140  139  138  137  136  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
16/9/2016
12:29
There's going to be a bit of volatility in PDG around now, due to exiting the FTSE 250 index tonight. Don't be surprised to see a large uncrossing volume (perhaps 10m-20m) in today's closing auction as funds adjust their investment weightings.
typo56
15/9/2016
14:53
Selling is continuing today. The other motor traders have come back a bit recently but PDG still edging down. Any thoughts? Negatives? Worth a nibble at 30p? Goes interim ex-dividend next week. Approximately 5% full year dividend yield.
ed 123
02/8/2016
06:26
Very solid results all things considering! Odey certainly confident.
tintin82
08/7/2016
09:32
Well Odey still likes it. His holding up over 17% now.
jeffian
07/7/2016
10:55
buybacks continue. Added a few at 28.5p
mister md
03/6/2016
14:39
It's hard to tell. It may just be up on the fundamentals.
jeffian
03/6/2016
11:27
well, whatever people think of the buybacks, at least it is helping to increase the shareprice ...
mister md
20/5/2016
17:55
I always think "If you don't like it, sell" is a rather lame response. Managers don't own the business. Why should shareholders be bullied out of their stock? The point is that managers don't control the share price, the market does. They hope that by artificially boosting eps and nav, the share price will reflect that but, as my ETI example above shows, they can't control that. They are taking real cash and spending it in a way that it could easily disappear in a puff of smoke. There is an argument for buying in your own debt if it is trading below par or equity if it is trading below asset value, but that is not the case at PDG where they are paying a premium to the NAV of 27p/share (and that includes a good slug of goodwill). They're paying £1 for 77p. If shareholders feel they've had value from this 'investment', good luck to them.
jeffian
20/5/2016
11:32
Simple, if you guys don't like the buyback and think you know better than the company, sell it to the market now that the buyback perhaps offer you a better opportunity to sell. Personally, as long as the management is prudent and it can leverage reasonably cheaper long term debt at much lower cost than equity, say it can borrow on 5 years or more at lower than 4-5 % interest, it is better than the current equity capital cost at almost over 10% with a pe lower than 10.
riskvsreward
20/5/2016
10:52
I hate buybacks. They masquerade as a "return of value to shareholders" but they are nothing of the sort. They return all the value to some of the shareholders - who are promptly no longer shareholders! Of course, the reduction of shares in issue inflates both the Earnings Per Share and Net Asset Value per share (a cynic might wonder if these are metrics for Directors' performance bonuses!) but whether that is reflected in the market value of the shares we continue to hold is questionable. Enterprise Inns were the worst culprits, blowing £1bn (yes, really) buying shares up to £8 which went as far down as 26p. They're doing it again now - they're spending £25m (equivalent to a 5p dividend) and the share price is lower than when they started! If companies consider that they have 'excess cash' and want to return it to shareholders, they can pay it out as a dividend, pay it out as a return of capital, or make a free scrip issue of additional shares. THAT is 'returning value to (all) shareholders'. Buybacks are not.
jeffian
20/5/2016
08:41
Yes, it's only £20M. At an interest rate of, say, 5%, it means they'll only waste £1M of shareholders' funds each and every year going forward. The company is not in a net cash position; it has borrowings. On the other hand, buying up freeholds is good for shareholders, as it increases eps while keeping hold of the asset value.
ed 123
20/5/2016
07:40
Exactly, it's £20 mil, perfectly manageable. Not generally a fan of buybacks, but comfortable here due to lack of acquisition opportunity as stated.
tintin82
20/5/2016
07:31
alanjames999 True, but what would you think if a China meltdown (or whatever) brought a recession and PDG shares traded at under 20p again? That cash would have been very useful. Looking for the positives, at least it's only £20M. It could have been more.
ed 123
20/5/2016
07:26
At least the buy backs were at a low opposed to mid 40s :)
alanjames999
20/5/2016
07:22
tintin82 I disagree. The buybacks will increase debt and put the company more at risk in the event of a downturn. The usual line about improving balance sheet efficiency does not impress me at all. Buybacks, in the near term, boost earnings per share, which is often a bonus related kpi for the directors. The buybacks also boost the income of the company's advisers/brokers (so, how clean is their advice?). The major shareholders go along with it because, either they want some strength to sell into, or they like the short term share price rise because it makes their figures look a bit better. Imv, the company should have held onto the cash.
ed 123
20/5/2016
06:23
Excellent news, quite happy with this buyback, the balance sheet can certainly afford it. A bit of momentum now would be nice.
tintin82
29/4/2016
23:41
Are you on commission? Nope. He's on tracks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0ZKpSfiHLU
ed 123
29/4/2016
22:38
thomasthetank1, I can't help noticing that every single post you make seems to link back to research-tree.com Are you on commission?
jeffian
29/4/2016
12:10
Read Arden Partners's note on PENDRAGON, out this morning, by visiting hxxps://www.research-tree.com/company/GB00B1JQBT10 "Valuations in the UK motor retail sector have de-rated as the market speculates that the UK is reaching a mature stage of the new car cycle... Consequently, we believe the market has meaningfully underestimated the longevity of the demand cycle which, alongside the evolving retail proposition at Pendragon, presents a significant value opportunity. We continue, therefore, to challenge the rationale of modest sector valuations ..."
thomasthetank1
29/4/2016
09:46
"underlying EBITDA ratio continues to be significantly below our target range so we are assessing the best use of funds." Well they could always return it to shareholders as a dividend or return of capital! 8-)
jeffian
28/4/2016
07:18
Good update. The headline 'expected to be inline" doesn't sound impressive, but the rest of the detail all sounds better. The predicted softening in new car sales might sound negative for the car sales sector, but Pendragon's focus on aftersales leaves them better balanced than some peers.
grabster
28/4/2016
07:16
IMS seems fine....Historic eps 3.7p underlying 1st Q profits up 8.7% so seems reasonable to expect full year eps to rise to 4p....so PE ratio of just 8.5?
jaf111
26/4/2016
09:09
Agreed, just doubled down, expecting a solid update.
tintin82
Chat Pages: 147  146  145  144  143  142  141  140  139  138  137  136  Older
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