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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
National Grid Plc LSE:NG. London Ordinary Share GB00BDR05C01 ORD 12 204/473P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -1.70 -0.18% 930.00 930.50 930.70 932.50 920.90 928.90 5,726,527 16:35:04
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Gas Water & Utilities 14,540.0 1,754.0 36.5 25.5 33,007

National Grid Share Discussion Threads

Showing 7951 to 7974 of 8075 messages
Chat Pages: 323  322  321  320  319  318  317  316  315  314  313  312  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
09/2/2021
16:44
OFGEM a niggle and always will be since I started work for the gas in 97, but BG/Transco/NG. always survived and have delivered slow boring growth and go dividend.
lennonsalive
09/2/2021
16:15
Bond rates may be part of the reason but I give more weight to the following. The exchange rate with the dollar has reduced GBP Group profits by say 5% as the £ has strengthend by say 10%. The recent OFGEM settlement with a question mark over an appeal leaves the all important question will the divi be maintained will it continue to grow as often said the market hates uncertainty. This share is supposed to be safe and boring the last eighteen months has shown this not to be so. You had a Labour Party wanting to renationalise without fair compensation. Ofgem is in a war with NG to drive the hardest possible bargain to get a settlement. Now headlines about spliting part of NG. Folks accept lower returns on Utilities because of boring predictability take that away folks want higher returns this translates to a lower share price
mark1000
08/2/2021
14:14
current share price weakness is due to increase in bond yields, nothing to do with the potential forced sale.
unastubbs
08/2/2021
09:44
Uty, I too have had similar discussions with John Pettigrew. It's so very clear what the Money Men are trying to do. They are well aware of panic they will send to the Private Investor in order to get your shares cheap. They were spreading the same doom and gloom, as you refer, when NG was forced to ring-fence and then separate out Pumped Storage Generation (which National Grid used to own), because National Grid did not have a Generation License in the UK. Look at the share price then and compare it to today. Too many people are trying to manipulate the share price by publishing old news.
newbank
08/2/2021
09:05
I have personally advocated NG getting rid of the SO business to JP (CEO) himself. I remember having that conversation with him, saying it brings in so little in comparison with other elements of the business, but attracts too much stick from OFGEM, ie, it isn’t worth it. I know he was of the same opinion.
utyinv
06/2/2021
19:55
??? Market does not like uncertainty, government dictats and dollops of investment that reduce dividend payouts The big investors will be hedging positions Ofgem wants to split up National Grid hTtps://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ofgem-wants-to-split-up-national-grid-06q85p5w7
muffinhead
06/2/2021
19:50
If price keeps banging on support, eventually it goes and leads to a rush of selling Weekly timeframe chart hTtps://invst.ly/tqar9
muffinhead
02/2/2021
13:37
That’s why there is such a massive disconnect in what Politicians believe is possible in terms of cost and time and what is realistically feasible. The Gov and especially OFGEM (bunch of pen-pushing egotistical idealists), need to be honest with the public and tell them what the score really is. NG will always deliver, but it will cost and NG is not a charity.
utyinv
02/2/2021
11:33
@POR The peaks quoted are the actual measured ones (at the Grid Supply Point) the equivalent of Transmission System Demand, so power station demand etc has already been netted off The actual full output usable for two days ahead, including 100% import interconnectors and an assumed seasonal level of grid connected wind is currently 51964MW hTTps://www.bmreports.com/bmrs/?q=generation/nationaloutputusable-2-14
m100
02/2/2021
11:20
This is a KitKat wrapper calculation, happy to be corrected, sources quoted or provided if asked Assume you want to match the output from a wind turbine to be equivalent of that from gas (either CCGT or OCGT), or nuclear. That means you'll have an availability of between 91% & 95% with an average load factor (2019 figures) for CCGT of 43% and nuclear 62.9%, the former due to load following and balancing highly cyclical wind generation, the latter due to graphite / boiler issues, some nukes run much closer to 100% load factors (for instance Sizewell B in 2015, 110.1% load factor) Lets for the sake of simplicity assume you have 1MW of wind generation and a constant 1MW demand. Assume a 33% capacity factor, onshore will be worse, offshore better, the actual capacity factor (for 2019) is 26.2% onshore and 39.6% offshore. (from BEIS Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2019) Whilst you could generate 1MW x 8760h x (around 90%) = 7884MWh from gas or nuclear it will be lower unless you are running a closely connected aluminium refinery, oil refinery, chemical works or similar. Using the actual load / capacity factors for 2019 In one year 1MW of UK wind will produce 1MW x 8760h x (33%) = 2900MWh In one year 1MW of UK gas will on average produce 1MW x 8760h x (43%) = 3767MWh In one year 1MW of UK nuclear will on average produce 1MW x 8760h x (62.9%) = 5510MWh So to be equivalent in terms of annual Wh output you need at least 3767/2900 = 1.3MW of wind to be somewhat equivalent of 1MW of gas 5510/2900 = 1.9MW of wind to be somewhat equivalent of 1MW of nuclear But the wind doesn't blow on demand, it doesn't provide its rated output for '67% of the time' (dispersed randomly across the year) To maintain 1MW output when 67% of the time you aren't generating requires another 5869MWh of energy supply from somewhere else, normally in the UK this would be gas but for this exercise in saving the planet it's 'storage' For the purposes of this discussion assume the storage is in the form of the Tesla Powerpack 2 providing 200kWh storage and 55kW continuous output weighing around 2000kg Its cost in March 2020 is USD 172,707 or in February 2021 the equivalent of £125k For reference the Powerwall is the industrial sized version of the domestic Tesla Powerwall To maintain 1MW of wind output with a fully charged battery requires 18 Tesla Powerpack 2's, but it will only maintain that output for five hours, at a cost of £2.25m, whilst its capacity is for unlimited cycles the reality is that after a few thousand ups and downs it will be knackered, possibly arounud the same time as the wind turbine becomes time expired, lets say 15 years to be optimistic. In addition the storage requires recharging, so whilst satisfying a demand of 1MW you need more wind generation for recharging, so around 200% overbuild of wind generation is required. The wind may cease to blow for hours or even days, that is the big unknown and with 1TWh of demand a day on average for every day of the year it can go wrong really quickly. under 0.5GW of wind generation from 18GW of grid connected wind is not uncommon. So in low wind conditions, in around five hours, your lights go out, your fridge stops working, your heating fails (decarbonisation means no gas or oil) you can't charge your electric car, you have no internet, you have no mobile or fixed line phones, your supermarket can't order new supplies, the logistics chain totally collapses. When renewables operators have no absolutely desire to pay for the costs of their intermittency balancing with gas will go on forever whilst the choice for decarbonisation is wind and solar.
m100
02/2/2021
11:18
But the winter report has the cold weather peak at 60.4GW.They do seem to have a hell of a lot of adjusted peaks these days. But the peak peak - the realistic one which has to be satisfied if it occurs, seems to me to be 60.4GW.The list of descending peaks you quoted seems to be the peaks if we don't have a cold spell ..... I think.
pierre oreilly
02/2/2021
11:04
Yes, the Average Cold Spell peak is around 55GW but it's not being near that for ages. I'm quoting from the winter outlook report, the demand suppression due to covid is assumed by NG to be 5% (p9 in the winter outlook report) Plus the peak demand seen by NG at grid supply points is increasingly offset by embedded generation and triad avoidance. Demand has been dropping year on year since about 2005/6 For the past few years it has been as follows (GB excluding NI) 2015 51,100MW 2016 51,858MW 2017 50,608MW 2018 48,800MW 2019 46,802MW From BEIS Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2020 Plant Loads Demands and Efficiency hTTps://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/904815/DUKES_5.10.xls
m100
02/2/2021
09:42
m, yes, but that's just mainly down to covid. Any grid planning will be using around 55GW as the current peak (down from 60GW a few years ago) i would imagine. Or is the 'normal, non-covid affected' peak even less than that these days? Ian, There are quite a few ng people on here, I hope one of them will have a bash at answering you. I'll post my thoughts in a few days time if noone else does.
pierre oreilly
02/2/2021
09:19
@POR The highest demand so far this winter was just under 47GW Elexon Peak Demand, Indicative Peak & Triad Information hTTps://www.bmreports.com/bmrs/?q=demand/peakdemand/indpk That is broadly in line with what is in the NG 2020/21 winter outlook published in October 2020 (p8) The equivalent firm capacity assumed by NG for wind is, for this winter, 16%, down from 18% for the previous winter (EFC is analogous to the availability factor for conventional plant) (p11) The maximum generation capacity is declared at 100.7 GW (p7) Winter Outlook Report hTTps://www.nationalgrideso.com/document/178126/download
m100
02/2/2021
06:28
How far can battery storage address that problem of wind production being intermittent ?
ianguerin
01/2/2021
19:18
Peak demand is about 55GW these days Night time demand can be around 25GW. Wind capacity on the grid is about 25GW. So theroetically, at times, wind can supply 100% of demand. Generation from wind at 31% capacity factor will be about 9GW on average. But the important thing as far as the grid is concerned is that the range for that average will be from near zero to near 23GW i would think. That's what causes ng to put in place very expensive measures to maintain a stable grid with that level of intermittent penetration.
pierre oreilly
01/2/2021
16:20
Wind contribution to the grid peaks at about 12GW, UK peak demand about 43GW so not 50% - see here :hxxps://gridwatch.templar.co.uk/
samwn1
01/2/2021
08:48
Lippy, wind is intermittent and uncontrollable. With the extremely high penetration of wind on the grid, it can pretty quickly switch from supplying 0% to a high%. That is wind's major problem. The grid has to instantaneously match power all the time, and that is a major cost to the grid with increased primary reserve and increased availability cost. The capacity market, which ensures sufficient dispatchable power, costs about a billion pa, and this is a new market being a direct result of excess intermittent penetration. As more wind comes online, all these costs will rise to (hopefully) accommodate even more wind. When people say wind is cheap, the extra mega cost the grid bears to accommodate it is never taken into account.
pierre oreilly
30/1/2021
14:26
how is wind supposedly supplying nearly 50% of our power the other day,when its normally about 5%,is some one telling porkies or pigs are flying???
lippy4
30/1/2021
09:22
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/fair-wind-behind-supplier-of-energy-h7wkr325w
coxsmn
29/1/2021
16:06
Where is the 6% loss to make 100%?
samwn1
29/1/2021
12:50
A, Strange the share price is nearly where it was with the threat of Corbyn! Anything under £9 seems a bargain to me for the yield alone, plus getting rid of the ESO thorn and growth in the US, especially Biden's pledge on Green? BWTFDIK!
beckers2008
29/1/2021
12:26
Why this is hitting new lows? Any ideas guys?
action
29/1/2021
10:42
Thanks Dart.Its great we are becoming less reliant on the UK business.I invest in Ent and there is a parallel, increased regulation in UK being offset by huge growth in the US.
coxsmn
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