Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Group Plc LSE:BHP London Ordinary Share GB00BH0P3Z91 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -8.60 -0.54% 1,581.20 1,578.60 1,579.60 1,607.80 1,574.00 1,585.60 9,091,494 16:35:30
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 34,888.9 11,855.2 126.3 12.2 33,396

Bhp Share Discussion Threads

Showing 601 to 624 of 800 messages
Chat Pages: 32  31  30  29  28  27  26  25  24  23  22  21  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
21/1/2020
17:10
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 94.80 USD -0.01(-0.01%) Gold COMEX 1,560.60 +0.02% Silver COMEX 18.07 -0.04% Platinum NYMEX 1,009.90 -1.28% Copper COMEX 2.85 +0.05% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 64.72 -0.71% Gasoline NYMEX 1.66 +0.53% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.90 -1.20% WTI 58.39 USD -0.53% Rio Tinto 4,608.5 -1.46% Bhp 1,816.2 -1.36% Anglo American 2,200 -1.81% Glencore 238 -1.57%
waldron
21/1/2020
09:28
SYDNEY--BHP Group Ltd. (BHP.AU) reported stronger quarterly production of iron ore as it continued to capitalize on high prices for a commodity that is its main profit driver. BHP said it produced 60 million metric tons of iron ore in the three months through December, up 4% on the same period a year earlier when it temporarily suspended all of its rail operations in Australia's Pilbara region after a train ran loose for more than 50 miles before it was forcibly derailed. The quarterly result means BHP, the world's biggest miner by market value, produced 121 million tons of iron ore in its fiscal first half. Management stuck with annual guidance for between 242 million tons and 253 million tons from its Pilbara operations. BHP's Australian iron-ore shipments account for almost one-fifth of seaborne trade in the commodity. It is the world's third-largest iron-ore exporter, behind Vale SA (VALE) and Rio Tinto PLC (RIO.LN). BHP is in the midst of a leadership reshuffle that could have an impact on its growth strategy and which commodities and operations are favored for investment. Mike Henry became chief executive at the start of this month, replacing Andrew Mackenzie who will leave the company on March 31, three months sooner than was originally scheduled. Under Mr. Mackenzie's leadership, BHP sold assets ranging from U.S. shale gas deposits to South African coal mines and jettisoned a long-held pledge to increase its annual dividend. The result is a slimmed-down company, but one more reliant on swings in prices of just a handful of commodities such as iron ore and crude oil for profit growth. "We delivered solid operational performances across the portfolio in the first half of the 2020 financial year, offsetting the expected impacts of planned maintenance and natural field decline," Mr. Henry said. "Our six major development projects are progressing well, and we continue to advance our exploration programs in petroleum and copper." BHP said second-quarter output of petroleum products fell by 6% to 28 million barrels of oil equivalent. That reflected the impact of Tropical Storm Barry in the Gulf of Mexico and natural field decline across the company's portfolio. Quarterly copper output totaled 455,000 tons, driven by ongoing improvements in maintenance and operational performance at the Escondida mine in Chile. Write to David Winning at david.winning@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires January 20, 2020 16:52 ET (21:52 GMT)
florenceorbis
20/1/2020
17:07
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 94.15 USD -0.66(-0.70%) Gold COMEX 1,560.90 +0.04% Silver COMEX 18.07 -0.02% Platinum NYMEX 1,024.50 -0.03% Copper COMEX 2.84 -0.16% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 65.21 +0.56% Gasoline NYMEX 1.66 +0.08% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.92 -3.48% WTI 58.77 USD -0.78% Rio Tinto 4,677 +0.56% Bhp 1,841.2 -0.56% Anglo American 2,240.5 -0.22% Glencore 241.8 -0.58%
waldron
20/1/2020
17:06
21 January 2020 08:30 AM Melbourne time (approximate) BHP Operational Review for the half year ended 31 December 2019
waldron
20/1/2020
16:54
As China continues its long and painful move away from coal, solar and wind energy are becoming increasingly competitive. In September of last year Oilprice reported an incredible milestone for renewable energy when solar and wind power became cheaper than coal in most of the world. Now, a new report released this week by Wood Mackenzie Power and Renewables has heralded another milestone: China will soon be added to that list of countries in which coal is no longer more economical than renewable energy. This is a massive and massively important development because of the jaw-dropping scale at which China produces and burns coal. Alone, they consume as much coal as the rest of the world combined. While the fact that coal is being priced out in much of the world marks great progress for the fight against climate change, especially at a moment that the UN is reminding the world with urgency that renewables are the path forward, true progress simply isn’t possible without China on board. And now it seems the winds of change have reached Beijing. The Wood Mackenzie report, titled China provincial renewables competitiveness report 2019, reveals that the average levelized cost of electricity (LOCE) of solar and wind power in China is already cheaper than that of natural gas-fired power and will also overtake coal by just 2026. Wood Mackenzie Power and Renewables research director Alex Whitworth was quoted: “Across most of China’s provinces and regions, renewables cost premium remains over coal power, averaging 26 percent in 2019 for wind and solar, down from over 100 percent in 2010. Twenty-eight of 30 regions examined in our latest report see premiums of up to 70 percent, and only Shanghai and Qinghai have cost-competitive renewables today.” While China is making great progress toward renewable energy’s economic viability on the whole, some provinces will take a lot longer than other to wean themselves off coal, reports Power Engineering International. “Renewables competitiveness is achievable in the next few years for some of China’s regions, but for others, the journey will not be a sprint but a marathon – taking a decade or more,” they write. Wood Mackenzie’s Whitworth also commented that “wealthier demand centres on the coast and in parts of central and northeast China will be first to see competitive renewables costs. But renewables investment in some areas of northern China, such as Xinjiang, will not be competitive with coal-fired generation, even by 2040.” While progress will be uneven and the amount of renewable energy in China’s overall energy mix remains low, the projections are still hopeful. The efficiency gains in Chinese solar and wind are occurring in the larger context that China is moving toward ending subsidies for new wind and solar projects starting next year. This doesn’t mean that Beijing is not supporting renewable energies and that the move toward cheaper green energy by 2026 will be derailed, however. In fact, it means just the opposite: the subsidies worked. Much like in the United States and Western Europe, solar and wind have become economically viable without governmental support and have therefore outgrown their subsidy programs. Last year Bloomberg reported that “on sun-drenched fields across Spain and Italy, developers are building solar farms without subsidies or tax-breaks, betting they can profit without them. In China, the government plans to stop financially supporting new wind farms. And in the US, developers are signing shorter sales contracts, opting to depend on competitive markets for revenue once the agreements expire.” The Bloomberg article, published last September, highlights the huge importance of these green energy milestones, pointing out that this new era of economic self-sufficiency in wind and solar energy has “profound implications for the push to phase out fossil fuels and slow the onset of climate change” and that “electricity generation and heating account for 25 percent of global greenhouse gases. As wind and solar demonstrate they can compete on their own against coal- and natural gas-fired plants, the economic and political arguments in favor of carbon-free power become harder and harder to refute.”
loganair
20/1/2020
14:34
Is the BHP share price a buy as US–China trade tensions ease? The easing trade-tensions between the US and China are likely to assist Australian resources companies that deal with China. So, does this make the resources giant BHP Group Ltd (ASX: BHP) a buy? BHP is definitely my pick of the ASX resource sector shares. It is a diversified natural resources company and is one of the world’s top producers of commodities like iron ore, coal and copper. BHP also has substantial interests in oil and gas. As it is the third largest share listed on the ASX, not only can it leverage economies of scale, it is frequently bought and held by super funds and managed funds providers, and also by default is listed in many of the popular Australian exchange traded funds (ETFs) such as Vanguard Australian Shares Index ETF (ASX: VAS). Growing dividend yield on the back of solid financials: BHP’s strategy is to continue to consolidate its current assets, which involves divesting underperforming assets and reducing debt while also increasing operational efficiency. Its extensive portfolio includes some of the largest mining assets in the world, which continue to generate large and ongoing free cash flows. FY19 was a very successful year for BHP, with strong growth across its various segments. The mining giant produced a profit from operations of US$16.1 billion and an underlying earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) of US$23.2 billion at a margin of 53% for continuing operations. Also, there was a record US$17 billion returned to shareholders for the year. Dividend payouts were very attractive during FY2018–19, with BHP offering a fully-franked dividend payment of $4.76 per share. BHP increased its dividends in 2019, boosted by strong iron ore prices. The company currently has a mandate to maintain a dividend payout ratio of at least 50%, which is very favourable for shareholders. Historically, BHP’s dividend payout was well below that of the traditional high dividend paying shares such as the banks, because most of BHP’s profits were re-invested for growth. However, the mining giant has increased its dividend almost every year since 2010 and its dividend yield now sits at a very attractive 4.8%, fully franked. Easing trade tension should boost growth: The easing tensions in the trade war between US and China should assist BHP’s growth in FY20 and FY21, given that China accounts for around half of the world’s consumption of metals. In particular, it could lead to further strong demand for steel from China. Copper is another of BHP’s assets that has been performing strongly and is predicted to continue to do so.
loganair
18/1/2020
17:13
21 January 2020 08:30 AM Melbourne time (approximate) BHP Operational Review for the half year ended 31 December 2019 18 February 2020
grupo
18/1/2020
17:10
letsmakesome 18 Jan '20 - 17:04 - 456 of 456 0 0 0 Top Investment Advisors: Where to invest $10,000 Https://www.bloomberg.com/features/how-to-invest-10k/ The piece from Sarah Ketterer on energy stocks is interesting.
grupo
18/1/2020
17:04
Top Investment Advisors: Where to invest $10,000 https://www.bloomberg.com/features/how-to-invest-10k/The piece from Sarah Ketterer on energy stocks is interesting.
letsmakesome
17/1/2020
18:23
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 94.81USD 0.26(0.27%) Gold COMEX 1,560.10 +0.62% Silver COMEX 18.08 +0.79% Platinum NYMEX 1,024.10 +2.29% Copper COMEX 2.84 -0.09% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 64.65 +0.05% Gasoline NYMEX 1.65 -0.80% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.99 -2.98% (WTI) 58.49 USD -0.19% Rio Tinto 4,651 +2.75% Bhp 1,851.6 +2.30% Anglo American 2,245.5 +3.22% Glencore 243.2 +0.48%
waldron
17/1/2020
12:33
moneyweek Commodities look cheap Gold may be on a bull run, but industrial commodities, including copper, zinc and aluminium, remain cheap. by: Alex Rankine 17 Jan 2020 Gold surged to a seven-year high earlier this month. Yet many industrial metals proved “laggards̶1; in 2019, says Myra Saefong in Barron’s. Copper gained just 3.5% in 2019. Aluminium and zinc prices declined. Weakness in global manufacturing means that industrial metals were “left out of the commodities rally”. Time to catch up? “There are plenty of expensive assets in the world today,” says Rana Foroohar in the Financial Times, but most industrial commodities have remained “reliably cheap”. Indeed, they are “about as cheap relative to stocks as they have been in the past century”.
gibbs1
16/1/2020
21:17
Battery nickel price regains premium over metal Frik Els | January 16, 2020 | 12:56 pm Battery Metals Intelligence Markets Australia China Nickel Battery nickel price regains premium over metal Nickel sulphate market not too gloomy. Image: BHP Nickel West nickel mining complex in Western Australia. Much like prices for cobalt, lithium and graphite, nickel feedstock for battery manufacture ended 2019 on a weak note, as a retreat in Chinese electric vehicle sales in the second half of the year and slower than expected transition to nickel-rich battery chemistries hurt demand. Battery supply chain and megafactory tracker Benchmark Mineral Intelligence’s new nickel assessment details a nearly 9% fall in domestic Chinese prices for nickel sulphate during December. BHP decided last year to hold onto its Nickel West operations after many attempts to offload it, and is spending hundreds of millions of dollars switching its Australian operations to battery-grade production The midpoint price for December was pegged at CNY 26,000 per tonne (~$3,770 at today’s rate) for >22% Ni ex-works material, but Benchmark says the price rebounded towards the end of the month on restocking. At times in the third quarter sulphate actually sold at a discount to class 1 metal in China and for the year, prices are still more than 5% for the better. Prices for nickel sulphate in the rest of the world also declined at the end of last year but premiums over LME metal prices were steady at the equivalent of $2,000–$2,450 per tonne (>22% Ni CIF Asia) according to Benchmark data. Nickel metal traded on the LME went on a wild ride in 2019, from $10,715 a tonne it the start of January to above $18,000 in October, before ending the year $4,000 below its peak. Benchmark says its sources noted premiums for nickel sulphate are expected to remain relatively stable during the first half of 2020 on expectations of further delays at BHP’s Nickel West project. BHP decided last year to hold onto its Nickel West operations after many attempts to offload it, and is spending hundreds of millions of dollars switching its Australian operations to battery-grade production. Last year, less than 10% of nickel ended up in EV batteries with 70% of supply goes into making stainless steel. Global nickel production is less than 2.5 million tonnes per annum. Battery Metals Digest Mining.com
sarkasm
16/1/2020
11:41
BlackRock is the canary in the coalmine. Its decision to dump coal signals what’s next 15 janvier 2020, 20:08 CET John Quiggin is a former Member of the Climate Change Authority. He is a supporter of the UniSuper divest campaign Https://unisuperdivest.org. The announcement by BlackRock, the world’s largest fund manager, that it will dump more than half a billion dollars in thermal coal shares from all of its actively managed portfolios, might not seem like big news. Announcements of this kind have come out steadily over the past couple of years. Virtually all the major Australian and European banks and insurers, and many other global institutions, have already announced such policies. According to the Unfriend Coal Campaign, insurance companies have stopped covering roughly US$8.9 trillion of coal investments – more than one-third (37%) of the coal industry’s global assets, and stopped offering reinsurance to 46% of them. Blackrock matters because it is big The announcement matters, in part because of Blackrock’s sheer size. It is the world’s largest investor, with a total of $US7 trillion in funds under its control. Its announcement it will “put climate change at the center of its investment strategy” raises questions about the soundness of smaller financial institutions that remain committed to coal and to a carbon-based economy. Exract from BlackRock's letter to clients, January 14, 2020 Blackrock is also important because its primary business is index funds, that are meant to replicate entire markets. So far these funds are not affected by the divestment policy. BlackRock’s iShares United States S&P 500 Index fund, for instance, has nearly US$23 billion in assets, including as much as US$1 billion in energy investments. But the contradiction between the company’s new activist stance and the passive replication of an energy-heavy index such as Australia’s is obvious. The pressure to find a solution will grow. In time, the entire share market will be affected One solution might be for large mining companies such as BHP to dump their coal assets in order to remain part of both Blackrock’s actively managed (stock picking) and passively managed (all stocks) portfolios. Another might be the development of index funds from which firms reliant on fossil fuels are excluded. It is even possible that the compilers of stock market indexes will themselves exclude these firms. The announcement has big implications for the Australian government. À lire aussi : Fossil fuel campaigners win support from unexpected places Blackrock chief executive Laurence Fink noted that climate change has become the top issue raised by clients. He said it would soon affect all all investments – everything from municipal bonds to mortgages for homes. Once investors start assessing government bonds in terms of climate change, Australia’s government will be in serious trouble. Australia’s AAA rating will be at risk The bushfire catastrophe and the government’s inadequate response have shown the world Australia is both among the countries most exposed to climate catastrophe and one of the worst in terms of contributions to solutions. Once bond investors follow the lead of Blackrock and other financial institutions, divestment of Australian government bonds will follow. This process has already started, with the decision of Sweden’s central bank to unload its holdings of Australian government bonds. Taken in isolation, Sweden’s move had virtually no effect on Australia’s bond prices and yields. But the most striking feature of the divestment movement so far is the speed with which it has grown from symbolic gestures to a severe constraint on funding for the firms it touches. À lire aussi : Climate change: why Sweden's central bank dumped Australian bonds The fact that the Adani corporation was unable to find a single bank willing to fund its Carmichael mine is an indication of the pressure that will come to bear. The effects might be felt before large-scale divestment takes place. Ratings agencies such as Moody’s and Standard and Poors are supposed to anticipate risks to bondholders before they materialise. It’ll make inaction expensive Once there is a serious threat of large-scale divestment in Australian bonds, the agencies will be obliged to take this into account in setting Ausralia’s credit rating. The much-prized AAA rating is likely to be an early casualty. That would mean higher interest rates for Australian government bonds which would flow through the entire economy, including the home mortgage rates mentioned in the Blackrock statement. The government’s case for doing nothing about climate change (other than cashing in on past efforts) has been premised on the “economy-wrecking” costs of serious action. But as investments associated with coal are increasingly seen as toxic, we run an increasing risk that inaction will cause greater damage.
ariane
16/1/2020
11:35
21 January 2020 08:30 AM Melbourne time (approximate) BHP Operational Review for the half year ended 31 December 2019
ariane
16/1/2020
09:45
Interesting to hear that the transition from Coal, Oil and Diesel to Gas is already starting to happen. Gas has 1/2 the CO2 as Oil or Diesel. Gas to produce energy will then be replaced by Hydrogen, the transition will start in earnest by 2050. By 2050 Coal, Oil and Gas will become 'Stranded Assets'.
loganair
14/1/2020
20:19
BHP advances construction on $3.6bn South Flank iron ore project MiningOther CommoditiesIndustrial Minerals By NS Energy Staff Writer 14 Jan 2020 Fluor earlier secured a contract to provide the engineering, procurement, and construction management services for the South Flank project Ore_Handling_Plant The South Flank iron ore handling plant in Pilbara region of Western Australia. (Credit: Business Wire) US-based Fluor has erected the first 1500t module for the ore handling plant of BHP’s $3.6bn South Flank iron ore project in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. The module erection advances the construction of the project, which had already saw a 50% completion in October last year. Fluor is serving as the engineering, procurement, and construction management services provider for the South Flank project. Fluor Mining and Metals business president Tony Morgan said: “We are extremely proud of what we have been able to accomplish with BHP on this project including our commitment to achieve diversity through the hiring of indigenous and local team members. “The pioneering integrated team approach on this project is truly a collaborative effort. We look forward to continuing our long and successful relationship with BHP on this project and beyond.” South Flank project will become one of the world’s largest iron ore processing hubs The South Flank project, upon completion, will become one of the largest iron ore processing hubs in the world featuring the latest advances in autonomous-ready fleets, digital connectivity and modular design. Expected to employ more than 9,000 people over its life, the project comprises an 80-million-ton-per-year crushing and screening plant, an overland conveyor system and rail-loading facilities. Prior to securing the follow-on construction and project management contract, Fluor completed the feasibility study for the project. BHP commenced construction on the South Flank project in July 2018, with first iron ore production scheduled to start in 2021. The South Flank project aims to completely replace production from the 80 million tons per annum (Mtpa) Yandi iron ore mine, which started production in 1991 and is nearing the end of its economic life. Expected to have operational life over 25 years, the South Flank project will expand the already established infrastructure at Mining Area C. BHP owns 85% interest in the Mining Area C and South Flank project while Itochu and Mitsui own 8% and 7% stakes respectively.
maywillow
14/1/2020
10:51
Blackrock are going to Sell their shares in companies that are heavily into Coal - the push is coming from clients. Other Banks and investment houses are likely to follow suit. The sooner BHP is out of Coking coal for power stations etc the better. I just hope they have not left it too late to Sell their Coking coal assets.
loganair
11/1/2020
09:59
Https://news.metal.com/list/the-latest
sarkasm
10/1/2020
17:37
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 93.56 USD -0.01(-0.01%) Gold COMEX 1,560.70 +0.41% Silver COMEX 18.15 +1.17% Platinum NYMEX 986.20 +1.46% Copper COMEX 2.81 +0.18% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 65.29 -0.12% Gasoline NYMEX 1.68 +0.90% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.17 +1.02% (WTI) 59.2 USD -0.54% Rio Tinto 4,488 +0.83% Bhp 1,782 +0.61% Anglo American 2,165 +0.98% Glencore 240.2 +0.73%
waldron
10/1/2020
11:22
21 January 2020 08:30 AM Melbourne time (approximate) BHP Operational Review for the half year ended 31 December 2019 lets hope all becomes clear soon
grupo guitarlumber
10/1/2020
11:19
I do not call $1.5bln as a side line investment, even for such a large miner as BHP. I would much prefer this money to go into more Copper investment where there is likely to be a short fall during this decade while there is an over supply of Potash which even BHP acknowledges. I would like to see BHP get out of the Coal (Thermal Coal) used for power stations as quickly as possible as this coal is becoming more and more of a 'Stranded Asset.' I would also like to see BHP not increase their Coking Coal (Coal used for large scale Steel production) investment as I think with in a Decade other sources will start to be used to make steel rather then Coking coal. Therefore again Coking Coal will become a 'Stranded Asset' for BHP - not yet, however could happen by 2030.
loganair
10/1/2020
10:17
BHP Provides Jansen Project Update to City Council Category: Local News Published: Tuesday, 17 December 2019 10:31 Written by Maury Wrubleski Image courtesy of BHP. The Jansen Mine Project continues as company awaits board approval. In spite of the current oversupply issue facing the potash industry, major player BHP continues to remain confident about its entry into the industry and about the prospects of its Jansen Potash Project. That’s according to Ken Smith, manager of corporate affairs for BHP, as reported at December 16th’s Humboldt City Council meeting. Smith was on hand along with Ann Paton, corporate affairs specialist at their LeRoy office. During his presentation, Smith recapped the company’s commitment and its progress thus far. Smith also provided an update on the timing of the board’s decision-making process on proceeding with the project. In his preamble, Smith explained that potash remained an important and attractive commodity for the company. The Jansen Project, which has been ongoing since 2010-11, was designed to see the resource giant enter into the space. The company is firmly established in iron ore, copper, coal, and petroleum. During the intervening years, the industry has witnessed a downturn in potash pricing and the market as a whole for various reasons, but Smith notes that the company’s confidence rests on its projected demand for potash throughout the next decades. “Potash is a key link in the global food security chain, and as the global population grows and diets change, the use of agricultural fertilizer such as potash is going to be increasingly important in the years to come. By the year 2050, we anticipate that the world’s population will exceed 10 billion people, and as a result, we feel that potash supply will become increasingly important.” The company is still on target to produce the 8.6 million tonnes annually as authorized by the government of Saskatchewan. With the shafts drilled, the excavation equipment extracted, and work continuing on the liners, BHP continues to entertain the long game at the Jansen Project site. The main hurdle continues to be the demonstration of its board’s confidence by giving the go-ahead to the next phase that would lead to production. Smith provided City Council with that timeline. “We anticipate a decision from the Board of Directors on the Jansen Potash Project, the first stage of 4.3 to 4.5 million per annum, to occur by February 2021. The estimated cost of the initial stage of that project is approximately 5 billion USD. At the mine site, we would expect an approximate 4 to 5 year period for the construction of the facilities to commence production.” Smith went on to state that the first production following a positive board decision could be in approximately 5 years resulting in the first loads going out in 2026. In the meantime, work continues on providing rail capacity via both CN and CP lines, including rail spurs to and from the mine. As well, the company continues to assess potential export facilities, the most likely candidates being at the Fraser Surrey Docks in BC and Port of Grays Harbour in Washington state. Approximately 300 workers are currently at the Jansen Project site, mostly contractor employees, the largest of which is known as TRL, installing the final liner in the service and production shafts.
grupo guitarlumber
10/1/2020
10:06
thanks logan why against potash its just a side line it seems unless you feel ardently against its use for fertilisers but their are many other uses glass etc etc Https://www.marketscreener.com/BHP-GROUP-47281658/company/ DO YOU KNOW WHAT USES THEIR POTASH IS PUT TO is the jensen not yet decided upon until feb 2021, so perhaps to please you, they will not do Have a good one
grupo guitarlumber
10/1/2020
09:53
I think BHP increasing their exposure to Copper which is needed more and more in modern electrical technology and EV vehicles is a very positive and good move by BHP, however investing such huge amount in Potash I think in not a good move by BHP and wished they had never done so. It seems to me BHP getting so hugely involved in Potash is similar to their investing in the fracking in the Permian Basin in the USA which I am so glad BHP got out of and in the end did not make too much of a loss on. I would like to see BHP investing no more money in Potash and to sell their Potash investments.
loganair
Chat Pages: 32  31  30  29  28  27  26  25  24  23  22  21  Older
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
BHP
Bhp
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20200530 19:18:06