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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Group Plc LSE:BHP London Ordinary Share GB00BH0P3Z91 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  18.00 1.15% 1,589.80 1,590.80 1,592.00 1,601.00 1,569.40 1,590.00 6,577,414 16:35:24
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 34,886.2 11,854.3 126.3 12.2 33,578

Bhp Share Discussion Threads

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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
29/11/2019
17:05
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 84.68USD 0.26(0.31%) Gold COMEX 1,470.40 +0.57% Silver COMEX 17.08 +0.29% Platinum NYMEX 899.10 +0.46% Copper COMEX 2.66 -0.60% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 60.82 -3.92% Gasoline NYMEX 1.61 -4.69% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.34 -5.77% I (WTI) 55.62 USD -4.22% Rio Tinto 4,201.5 -1.60% Bhp 1,710 -1.97% Anglo American 2,026.5 -1.31% Glencore 243.9 -1.61%
waldron
25/11/2019
11:00
Shares in SolGold PLC (SOLG.LN) rose Monday after the company said BHP Group PLC (BHP.LN) has agreed to buy an extra 4% in the company worth $22 million, making it SolGold's largest shareholder. The Ecuador-focused mining company said BHP will buy 77 million shares at 22.15 pence each, a 13% premium to Friday's closing price of 19.58 pence a share. The company said BHP will then own 282.7 million shares, or 14.7% of its issued share capital. The company said BHP has agreed not to acquire further shares in, or make an offer for, SolGold for a period of two years. However it said BHP has a right to acquire up to 246.6 million SolGold shares--not counting shares acquired by way of certain permitted acquisitions--and it also has a right to make an offer for SolGold provided it has first been approved by the company's shareholders. "SolGold is pleased to welcome BHP into a further position in the company. SolGold's view is that the agreement endorses its view of SolGold's commanding Ecuadorean copper and gold exploration footprint, and in particular the robust Alpala deposit," Chief Executive Nicholas Mather said. Shares at 0955 GMT were up 12% at 22 pence. Write to Anthony O. Goriainoff at anthony.orunagoriainoff@dowjones.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires November 25, 2019 05:24 ET (10:24 GMT)
grupo
25/11/2019
10:19
BHP is prioritizing future growth in copper and oil, and sees Ecuador as a key focus for new mining projects. Dwindling supply from aging copper mines and rising demand from renewable energy and the electric vehicle sector will combine to boost the metal’s outlook, the miner said in August. Exploration will be “the most cost effective way” of adding to the company’s growth pipeline, outgoing CEO Andrew Mackenzie said last month in a webcast. “We have positions in some very prospective parts of the world where we think we can add significantly to our resource base.”
loganair
25/11/2019
07:20
BHP Group plans to increase its 11% stake in SolGold PLC to become the largest shareholder of the Ecuador-focused miner, Bloomberg reported, citing people familiar with the proposal. --Details of the size of the investment, which would see BHP replace Newcrest Mining Ltd. as SolGold's top shareholder, could be released within days, the sources said. Full story: Https://bloom.bg/33dQvC4 Write to Singapore editors at singaporeeditors@dowjones.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires November 24, 2019 22:38 ET (03:38 GMT)
grupo
24/11/2019
14:07
Https://www.fool.com.au/2019/11/22/goldman-sachs-tips-rio-tinto-shares-as-a-buy/
the grumpy old men
22/11/2019
16:51
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 83.79 USD 0.24(0.29%) Gold COMEX 1,465.30 +0.12% Silver COMEX 17.03 -0.21% Platinum NYMEX 893.00 -2.67% Copper COMEX 2.64 +0.67% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 63.23 -1.16% Gasoline NYMEX 1.67 -1.57% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.69 +2.56% (WTI) 57.68 USD -1.08% Rio Tinto 4,184.5 +2.14% Bhp 1,706.6 +2.18% Anglo American 2,063.5 +2.56% Glencore 246.9 +3.05%
waldron
15/11/2019
17:06
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore82.80 USD 0.28(0.34%) Gold COMEX 1,465.40 -0.54% Silver COMEX 16.92 -0.63% Platinum NYMEX 894.80 +1.36% Copper COMEX 2.64 +0.67% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 63.25 +1.56% Gasoline NYMEX 1.64 +1.76% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.75 +0.96% (WTI) 57.71 USD +1.32% Rio Tinto 4,154.5 +1.54% Bhp 1,690 +0.92% Anglo American 2,037.5 +0.79% Glencore 243.6 +1.90% WHAT A PLEASANT END TO THE WEEK
waldron
15/11/2019
16:16
The three biggest challenges facing BHP's new boss Mike Henry: 1.Jansen potash project: These days, BHP is considered to be a business in good shape. The Mackenzie years successfully transformed it into a leaner, simpler and more productive company. The demerger of South32 was a major part of this. So too was the decision to abandon BHP’s disastrous boom-time foray into the US onshore sale section. For BHP investors, “what’s next” is the question lingering now. “It’s all well to be shrinking yourself to greatness the last few years,” says Argo Investments’ Andy Forster. “But I suppose people want to know how are they going to grow the business from here.” Somewhere toward the top of the list, says Forster, is the fate of BHP’s project in Canada’s Saskatchewan province to mine potash, a fertiliser used in agriculture to help plants grow. BHP has already funnelled billions of dollars into the project, which Mackenzie has pushed as part of the miner's move to diversify away from fossil fuels. But a decline in potash prices and scepticism from investors have thrown the project’s future into uncertainty. In October, BHP committed to spending a further $500 million before reaching a final investment decision. The fate of Jansen is one of the looming decisions that will occupy Henry early on in his new role. 2.Bass Strait: Fifty kilometres off the coast of Victoria’s Gippsland lies the Bass Strait oil fields, with 23 oil rigs and subsea stations and a massive network of underwater pipes that have oil and gas flowing 24 hours a day. The oil fields, operated by a joint venture between BHP and US oil giant ExxonMobil, stretches back to 1964 and supplies somewhere between 40 and 50 per cent of east-coast Australia’s domestic gas demand. More recently, however, the output from the fields has been in natural decline. ExxonMobil announced in September it was putting its 50 per cent stake up for sale and was seeking potential buyers following a review of its global assets. No agreement has been reached yet and no buyer identified. But the move raises questions for BHP and Mike Henry. Despite shrinking production from conventional oil and gas assets in Australia and an accelerating global shift towards electric vehicles, BHP last week laid out an ambitious plan to lift profit margins and strengthen returns from its diminishing petroleum division, insisting it has a bright future. When asked if BHP was considering buying Exxon's stake or selling out of the project as well, Geraldine Slattery, the head of the division, said it was "considering all our options". Although BHP said its focus in the meantime was continuing to derive value from the project as demand remained strong, the company has been open in saying it does not see “material upside” in the oil fields beyond the 2020s. 3.Thermal coal: In the past year, questions have been rising about a potential exit of BHP from thermal coal, the heaviest-polluting fossil fuel. As miners and other fossil fuel-exposed businesses come under mounting pressure from institutional investors to reduce their climate risks, Rio Tinto, the world's second-largest miner, last year removed all its exposure to thermal by selling off its last remaining coal mines. Other major miners, including Anglo-American, are also considering a coal-free future. Under Mackenzie's leadership, BHP has earned a reputation as one of corporate Australia's leading advocates for stronger action to combat global warming. The company has been adopting a growing focus on sustainability and mitigating the long-term risks to its business posed by climate change. This year, it unveiled an ambitious $500 million emissions-reduction drive aimed not only at cutting greenhouse gas from its own mining operations but also pollution from its customers such as the steel mills or power plants that use its coal and iron ore. Its exposure to thermal coal, therefore, would be at odds with this long-term vision. BHP under Mackenzie has adopted a harder line on thermal coal, declaring it would not increase its exposure by making further investments in its coal operations in New South Wales or in Colombia. Speculation of a potential sale has increased ahead of the looming closure of AGL's Liddell power plant in NSW, which is a major customer of BHP's Mount Arthur coal. When asked about BHP's future in coal at the company's Sydney annual general meeting this month, Mackenzie stressed that coal accounted for just 3 per cent of BHP's asset base. Mackenzie said BHP's analysis showed coal would contribute "less and less to the energy mix in the years to come before sharply declining in the 2030s". While stressing the Mount Arthur operation would remain viable longer than other coal mines around the world due to its efficiency and productivity, Mackenzie gave no commitment that it would be BHP which would be operating it. When Henry next faces investors and analysts, the thermal coal questions are unlikely to fall away.
loganair
13/11/2019
23:07
MELBOURNE, Australia--BHP Group Ltd. (BHP.AU) named Mike Henry as its new chief executive, opting for his experience running the most profitable operation of the global miner after a tumultuous period of big swings in commodity prices and exiting legacy assets. Andrew Mackenzie, who has led the company for more than six years, will retire at the end of the year and his successor will take on the role of CEO from Jan. 1, the world's largest-listed mining company said Thursday. Mr. Henry, a veteran BHP executive who has run the Australian minerals division for more than three years, succeeds Mr. Mackenzie at a time when major resources companies are being pressed by investors to map out a clearer strategy for growth. The Australian minerals division includes most of BHP's iron-ore operations and the Olympic Dam uranium-copper mine. Under Mr. Mackenzie's leadership, BHP sold assets ranging from U.S. shale gas deposits to South African coal mines and jettisoned a long-held pledge to increase its annual dividend. The result is a slimmed-down company, but one more reliant on swings in prices of just a handful of commodities such as iron ore and crude oil for profit growth. Mr. Henry, a Canadian, will face some tricky decisions early in his tenure. They include the future of BHP's thermal coal assets as climate-change concerns shape decisions by many institutional investors. BHP's oil business also is facing competition from the rising popularity of electric vehicles, while the company aims to decide by February 2021 whether to push ahead with a big potash mine in Canada, which would add a new commodity leveraged to demand for fertilizer. Then there is the Samarco operation in Brazil that it owns with Vale SA (VALE), and which has been offline since a tailings dam burst fatally in 2015. "Mike Henry's deep operational and commercial experience, developed in a global career spanning the Americas, Europe, Asia and Australia, is the perfect mix for our next CEO," said Chairman Ken MacKenzie, who has led the board for just over two years. Mr. Henry's career at BHP includes running the company's commodity marketing business, and he has experience of supply negotiations with China, the world's top buyer of iron ore and metallurgical coal. He also was an advocate for better use of technology at mines as a way to improve profits through greater efficiency. Mr. MacKenzie said he was confident in Mr. Henry's discipline and focus to deliver higher performance and returns for the company. The range of experience had led many investors to speculate that Mr. Henry was a front-runner to be the next chief executive. Mr. Henry was also one of the few executives to keep a senior role when Mr. Mackenzie took the helm in May 2013 and overhauled the management team. Mr. Henry will take over BHP at a time when its financial performance is healthier than for some time. BHP reported a net profit of US$8.31 billion for the 12 months through June-the best result in five years--on the back of strong iron-ore prices. It also declared a record dividend payout to shareholders. BHP's recovery partly reflects the steps taken by Mr. Mackenzie, which included delays to some major projects and a tight focus on cutting costs. Big deals mostly weren't considered, while BHP carved out several mining operations that it no longer wanted into a new company, known as South32 Ltd., that was then listed in Australia, South Africa and London. Mr. Mackenzie, a Scottish-born geologist, also led the company through the sale of onshore U.S. shale gas assets that were purchased by his predecessor for roughly US$20 billion. They were sold for US$10.8 billion in a deal agreed to last year. The outgoing CEO said the company was in a good position, with a simple portfolio, strong balance sheet and options for growth. He added choosing the right time for retirement wasn't an easy decision. "Fresh leadership will deliver an acceleration in the enormous potential for value and returns that will come from BHP's next wave of transformation," Mr. Mackenzie said. Write to Robb M. Stewart at robb.stewart@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires November 13, 2019 17:04 ET (22:04 GMT)
waldron
12/11/2019
18:51
Another Major Miner Turns Its Back On Coal By MINING.com - Nov 12, 2019, 11:30 AM CST Major Miner Coal Anglo American (LON AAL) could become the next top miner to walk away from thermal coal, as the commodity was barely mentioned Tuesday in a series of presentations to investors as one of the company’s main pillars of growth from 2020 and beyond. The diversified miner, which has consistently been offloading coal operations since 2014, has lowered its 2021 thermal coal target to 26 million tonnes from a previous goal of as much as 30 million tonnes. According RBC Capital Markets, Anglo should decide next year whether the controversial commodity fits into its future portfolio. The company is on a trajectory away from thermal coal and may be better off selling those assets, RBC analyst Tyler Broda said in a note to investors. “With rising ESG concerns, we would expect Anglo will divest this higher-quality and exports-focused business,” he wrote. Metallurgical or coking coal, however, does appear to be one of Anglo’s key commodities moving forward. Despite a slight production drop from 23-25 million tonnes to 22-24 million tonnes expected next year, Anglo’s metallurgical coal guidance for 2022 increases to an estimated 26-28 million tonnes. “We believe our iron ore, met coal and nickel businesses are well set to meet future demand trends,” the company’s Bulk Commodities chief, Seamus French, said in a presentation. Top mining companies have been reducing or eliminating their exposure to coal on environmental grounds. Rio Tinto (ASX, LON: RIO), the world’s second largest miner, fully exited the coal sector in March 2018, with the sale of its Kestrel coal mine in Australia to private equity manager EMR Capital and Indonesia’s Adaro Energy for $2.25 billion. Related: The Birth Of An LNG Superpower Rival BHP (ASX, NYSE:BHP) took a step in the same direction in July, revealing it had been mulling options to divest its thermal coal business, which includes assets in Australia and Colombia. Shareholders at the world’s largest mining company, however, don’t seem too keen to ditch coal. Last week, Australian investors voted against a plan that would have seen BHP leave lobby groups that promote policies at odds with the goals of the Paris climate accord. The agreement, signed in 2016 by almost 200 nations, aims at reducing emissions of planet-warming gases. Australia’s South32 (ASX, LON, JSE:S32), which spun out of BHP in 2015, is another company to have recently kissed the fossil fuel goodbye. Las week, it sold its thermal coal operations to Seriti Resources and two trusts, for 100 million rand ($6.78 million) upfront. By Mining.com
maywillow
12/11/2019
16:57
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 81.36 USD 1.06(1.30%) Gold COMEX 1,453.30 -0.26% Silver COMEX 16.71 -0.58% Platinum NYMEX 869.30 -1.28% Copper COMEX 2.65 -0.39% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 62.26 +0.13% Gasoline NYMEX 1.61 +0.49% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.71 -0.66% (WTI) 57.02 USD +0.72% Rio Tinto 4,145.5 +0.14% Bhp 1,696.4 +0.24% Anglo American 2,025 +0.77% Glencore 245.35 -0.06%
waldron
11/11/2019
17:06
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 80.30 USD -0.06(-0.07%) Gold COMEX 1,456.40 -0.44% Silver COMEX 16.79 -0.20% Platinum NYMEX 879.80 -1.49% Copper COMEX 2.66 -0.67% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 62.32 -0.30% Gasoline NYMEX 1.62 -0.17% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.73 -5.15% (WTI) 57.06 USD -0.05% Rio Tinto 4,139.5 -1.58% Bhp 1,692.4 -1.99% Anglo American 2,009.5 -2.66% Glencore 245.5 -3.50%
waldron
11/11/2019
06:07
MELBOURNE, Australia--BHP Group Ltd. (BHP.AU) has flagged a number of projects that could boost its oil production and help the global miner meet a supply gap that it anticipates even after demand for crude eventually peaks. In a presentation to be given to investors and shareholders in Sydney on Monday, BHP Petroleum President Geraldine Slattery said the company had a portfolio of assets and competitive growth options that are expected to generate strong cash flow and returns through the 2020s and beyond. BHP's oil and gas operations generate strong earnings margins, but it has faced criticism from some shareholders who don't see a fit between petroleum and minerals, including activist investor Elliott Management Corp. which has pushed for BHP to spin off its petroleum arm. The company last year exited its ill-fated onshore U.S. shale operations. Ms. Slattery said that if each of the oil and gas projects that BHP is involved in were to get investment approval, then the company's petroleum division could generate earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization margins of more than 60% and an average return on capital employed above 15% over the next decade. That, she added, would support average annual volume growth of up to 3% between the 2020 and 2030 financial years. The growth options include a stake in the Woodside Petroleum Ltd. (WPL.AU) controlled Scarborough natural-gas field off Western Australia, Wildling in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, Mexico's first deepwater oil development Trion and a deepwater gas discovery in Trinidad and Tobago. "In a decarbonising world, deepwater oil and advantaged gas close to established infrastructure can offer competitive returns for decades to come," Ms. Slattery said in her presentation. Over the last five years, BHP's petroleum portfolio has generated the highest Ebitda margin within the company at more than 65%. It has forecast a steady production decline from its aging base operations will be arrested for several years through the mid-2020s thanks to already approved projects like the expansion of the Mad Dog and Atlantis oil projects in the Gulf of Mexico, and output could grow from next decade if its other projects push ahead. As it now stands, BHP has forecast overall petroleum production from its operations of between 110 million and 116 million barrels of oil equivalent this financial year, a drop of as much as 9% on the year through mid-2019, and flagged output averaging about 110 million barrels over the medium term. In her presentation, Ms. Slattery said the company anticipates oil demand will be tempered in the years ahead by the electrification of transport and fuel-efficiency improvements, offset by rising living standards. Still, a supply gap of more than 50 million barrels a day could emerge by 2035 as global supply declines after several years of industry under-investment in both exploration and deepwater developments. Natural gas demand is at the same time diversifying and gaining a larger share of primary energy demand globally, with liquefied natural gas the fastest-growing fossil fuel. Woodside, which last week sharply lifted the resource estimate for the Scarborough gas field, expects a final investment decision on developing the field in the first half of next year. According to BHP, the first phase of Wildling could begin within two years and first oil could be produced from the 2023 financial year. The Trion project in Mexico could be producing from fiscal 2025 and the assets in Trinidad and Tobago continue to be assessed, but could begin production from fiscal 2027. Write to Robb M. Stewart at robb.stewart@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires November 10, 2019 19:24 ET (00:24 GMT)
misca2
08/11/2019
16:45
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 80.36 USD -2.19(-2.73%) Gold COMEX 1,467.60 +0.08% Silver COMEX 16.91 -0.62% Platinum NYMEX 895.10 -2.07% Copper COMEX 2.68 -1.61% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 62.07 -0.35% Gasoline NYMEX 1.62 -0.44% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.85 -0.38% (WTI) 56.78 USD -0.26% Rio Tinto 4,206 -2.92% Bhp 1,726.8 -1.43% Anglo American 2,064.5 -2.02% Glencore 254.4 -1.66%
waldron
07/11/2019
16:53
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 82.55 USD -0.43(-0.52%) Gold COMEX 1,463.00 -2.02% Silver COMEX 16.98 -3.54% Platinum NYMEX 908.40 -2.50% Copper COMEX 2.71 +1.63% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 62.50 +1.23% Gasoline NYMEX 1.63 +0.87% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.92 +0.31% (WTI) 57.36 USD +1.86% Rio Tinto 4,332.5 -0.36% Bhp 1,751.8 -0.64% Anglo American 2,107 +1.71% Glencore 258.7 +0.68%
waldron
07/11/2019
13:44
BHP Goldman Sachs Neutral Down from 1,900.00 to 1,800.00 Reiterates
adrian j boris
07/11/2019
13:37
Global mining companies are re-examining how they pay their chief executives, aiming to diminish the impact of external factors--like swings in commodity prices--that can mask a leader's true performance. At issue are big bonuses linked to total shareholder returns that can swell or shrink depending on how a company's share price performs. Miners--like companies in other sectors--say pay deals that rely too heavily on these bonuses can encourage risky behavior such as taking on big expansion projects or employing severe cost-cutting initiatives that, in some cases, take years to clean up. Instead, mining companies argue pay should be linked more closely with strategic targets, because that would better reflect what an individual executive can influence. A number of big miners including BHP Group Ltd., Rio Tinto PLC and South32 Ltd. are seeking to make changes to their executive pay plans, some starting from next year. "Mining companies' profitability, and therefore executive remuneration, is highly cyclical and strongly driven by market factors that are outside of their control," said Bill Hartnett, stewardship director at Aberdeen Standard Investments, which holds about 3.2% of BHP's London-listed stock for clients. BHP already has seen the pay for its CEO decrease in recent years. Marius Kloppers, who stepped down as CEO in 2013, earned as much as $16 million a year during a tenure that coincided with a China-led boom in prices for some of BHP's top commodities including coal and iron ore. His successor, Andrew Mackenzie, who took home a total of $3.5 million for fiscal 2019, has operated the company during a period of falling commodity prices as the world digests increasing amounts of supply from natural gas to iron ore. Messrs. Kloppers and Mackenzie declined to comment. Forecasting the cycle of commodity prices is a hazardous business. Bad weather sometimes disrupts supply, while demand for metals and minerals can rise or fall on political edicts, especially in China. Another big weakness in the current system: Building a mine or bringing an oil field into production can take longer than the time horizon for determining bonuses. That is especially the case when permits are needed from regulators or new infrastructure such as pipelines or railroads must be built. BHP's directors say linking more pay to a performance scorecard could be the answer. New stock awards would be held back for five years so that directors can be sure that management took decisions proven to create value. Those proposals were overwhelmingly accepted in final voting on the company's revamped policy at a meeting of Australian shareholders Thursday, with about 94% of holders of the U.K. and Australia listed shares agreeing to the changes. Had this policy been in place for Mr. Kloppers, he would have earned $19 million, or about 25%, less during the roughly five years through mid-2013, BHP said. Mr. Mackenzie would have earned only 2%, or $1 million, more than he has in the years since succeeding Mr. Kloppers. It might not be the last changes made by the company. Directors also plan next year to clarify and strengthen the link between performance on climate-change goals and pay, BHP said. "We are at the early stages of engagement with other major miners on their remuneration plans," said Mr. Hartnett, the fund manager, who supports BHP's proposal. Still, finding a balance that satisfies investors in different parts of the world isn't easy. Two years ago, Rio Tinto proposed replacing long-term performance share awards with restricted stock, while at the same time lowering the contribution of those long-run bonuses to the CEO's total pay packet. The proposal "was well-received in London. It was less well-received in Australia," Chairman Simon Thompson said at a shareholder meeting earlier this year. It was set aside. Rio Tinto says it is talking to investors and could try again, noting its remuneration policy must be reviewed every three years under U.K. law. "The board remains of the view that restricted stock has considerable merits in a long-term cyclical industry such as mining," the miner said. South32, which is also reviewing its pay structure, said it is hard to strike a balance that ensures it is still attractive to executives who might otherwise give the base-metals miner a pass. South32 Chief Executive Graham Kerr this year relinquished 4.7 million Australian dollars (US$3.2 million) in long-term bonuses that were part of a deal agreed when BHP spun off the business. The bonus in big part reflected a more than 40% rise in South32's share price since it began trading in 2015. "I don't think any of us expected to see South32 perform as strongly as it did over the first four years of its long-term plan," South32 Chairman Karen Wood said at an investor meeting recently. "We all felt--and by all, I'm including Graham very much in this assessment--that it would deliver an amount of money that we thought was not appropriate." Mr. Kerr was unavailable for comment. Write to Rhiannon Hoyle at rhiannon.hoyle@wsj.com and Robb M. Stewart at robb.stewart@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires November 07, 2019 08:14 ET (13:14 GMT)
adrian j boris
06/11/2019
17:03
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 82.98 USD 0.13(0.16%) Gold COMEX 1,489.30 +0.38% Silver COMEX 17.57 -0.02% Platinum NYMEX 932.20 +0.17% Copper COMEX 2.69 -0.54% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 62.29 -1.06% Gasoline NYMEX 1.63 -1.58% Natural Gas NYMEX 2.94 +0.03% (WTI) 56.82 USD -0.40% Rio Tinto 4,348 +0.12% Bhp 1,763 -0.09% Anglo American 2,071.5 -0.72% Glencore 256.95 -0.85%
waldron
06/11/2019
08:57
Https://www.bhp.com/investor-centre/upcoming-events NOVEMBER/06/2019 | 11:00pm Annual General Meeting NOVEMBER/11/2019 | 03:00am Investor Meeting perhaps more will be known tomorrow or at the investors meeting
sarkasm
06/11/2019
08:46
Was there any mention at what price BHP was selling these commodities for? As this is what is important.
loganair
06/11/2019
06:21
Nice. That's why strong then....Good time to be signing deals given level of iron ore prices compared to previous 2 to 3 years
the white house
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