Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Group Plc LSE:BHP London Ordinary Share GB00BH0P3Z91 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 1,677.20 1,679.20 1,679.80 0.00 0.00 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 34,886.2 11,854.3 126.3 13.5 35,424

Bhp Share Discussion Threads

Showing 651 to 672 of 675 messages
Chat Pages: 27  26  25  24  23  22  21  20  19  18  17  16  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
20/2/2020
17:19
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 86.15USD 0.45(0.52%) Gold COMEX 1,624.10 +0.76% Silver COMEX 18.37 +0.29% Platinum NYMEX 983.40 -2.10% Copper COMEX 2.59 -0.81% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 59.36 +0.41% Gasoline NYMEX 1.77 -0.46% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.99 +0.91% WTI 53.91 USD +0.30% Rio Tinto 4,209.5 +0.19% Bhp 1,677.2 -0.85% Anglo American 2,122.5 +1.65% Glencore 228.95 -1.31%
waldron
20/2/2020
15:17
Anglo American PLC, one of the world's largest miners, gave a full picture of fatalities related to its operations Thursday, a major shift in an industry that typically undercounts the number of deaths. A Wall Street Journal investigation revealed in December that many mining deaths are not captured by global safety statistics, making the industry seem safer to regulators, investors and consumers. Four Anglo American employees were killed at its managed operations in 2019, the company said in its full-year results. Taking into account other incidents -- including employees who died off-site in road accidents, two who died in 'security incidents' and one at a joint venture that Anglo doesn't manage -- a total of 18 miners died. Miners don't report deaths at joint ventures they don't manage, despite having influence over health and safety policy, leaving dozens of fatalities off the books. Fatalities that occur during the transportation of mined materials are also often undercounted. "We are not terribly good as an industry at reporting all incidents," said Anglo's Chief Executive Mark Cutifani. "They are our colleagues, we know them all, so we report all of those types of incidents," he said, talking of some of the deaths outside of mine sites last year. Between 2010 and 2018, the world's three largest publicly listed miners, BHP Group Ltd., Rio Tinto PLC and Vale SA, reported 117 deaths globally at their managed operations. There were an additional 89 deaths of workers during the same period at joint ventures the companies weren't running, according to a Journal analysis of company and government records, stripping out double counting. Miners have reduced fatalities and injuries in recent decades, but a lack of reliable accounting in the most basic safety metric makes it difficult to determine the extent of any gains. The pressure to improve safety and transparency is especially intense after a mine-waste dam operated by Vale burst last year, unleashing a river of mud in the Brazilian town of Brumadinho. In another example of how mining deaths are underreported, the Brazilian government doesn't count many contractors who die in mining accidents. As a result, as many as 139 of the 270 people who died at Brumadinho weren't classified as mining deaths. BHP, the world's largest miner, also recently began disclosing in some publications all deaths at all of its operations. Anglo went further on Thursday by tallying all deaths related to its operations high in its annual results announcement and placing that number alongside fatalities at managed operations. Write to Alistair MacDonald at alistair.macdonald@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires February 20, 2020 09:50 ET (14:50 GMT)
waldron
19/2/2020
17:18
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 85.70 USD 0.27(0.32%) Gold COMEX 1,611.00 +1.70% Silver COMEX 18.27 +2.84% Platinum NYMEX 1,004.80 +1.10% Copper COMEX 2.61 -0.80% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 59.11 +2.35% Gasoline NYMEX 1.77 +1.81% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.96 -0.56% WTI 53.15 USD +1.94% Rio Tinto 4,201.5 +0.71% Bhp 1,691.6 +1.44% Anglo American 2,088 +1.63% Glencore 232 +2.61%
waldron
19/2/2020
14:19
BHP’s half-year profits up almost 40% on strong iron ore prices Features & AnalysisMiningInvestment By James Murray 18 Feb 2020 BHP's underlying net profit after tax was $5.2bn on revenue of $23bn, for the six months ending in December BHP profits In its half-year update, BHP confirmed an interim dividend of $0.65 on its shares – a $0.10 increase from December 2018 (Credit: BHP Group) BHP recorded a 39% increase in its half-year profits, following a surge in global iron ore prices. The Anglo-Australian multinational, which is the world’s biggest mining firm, released figures today (18 February) showing underlying net profit after tax of $5.2bn, on revenues of $23bn, for the six months ending in December. That represents a major upturn from a year earlier, when profits stood at $3.7bn. In its half-year update, BHP also confirmed an interim shareholder dividend of $0.65 – a $0.10 increase compared to December 2018. Although that is the miner’s second-highest dividend payment, it is lower than the $0.71 anticipated by analysts. BHP’s new CEO Mike Henry, who took up the role at the start of this year, said the strong half-year results were grounded in “solid operational performance”. “From these strong foundations, we will build on our momentum to deliver exceptional performance,” he added. “I intend for BHP to be unquestionably the industry’s best operator – safer, lower cost, more reliable and more productive – with our portfolio and capabilities fit for the future. “We will be open to new ideas, more connected to those around us and more commercial in our thought and actions.” How BHP recorded its profits increase BHP recorded a profit on its operations of $8.3bn, up from $7.3bn a year earlier. This was attributed to higher iron ore prices, operational stability and favourable exchange rates. It also noted underlying earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation (EBITDA) of $12.1bn, rising from $10.5bn in December 2018 – while the EBITDA margin grew from 52% to 56%. Net debt rose 21% over the period from $9.2bn to $12.8bn, as a result of new leases in the second half of 2019. BHP also confirmed it had paid out $6m in costs related to the 2015 Samarco dam disaster, in which 19 people died in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The miner has been investing in restoration activities in the region as environmental and community rebuilding efforts continue. BHP warns coronavirus could continue to impact mineral demand Copper and iron ore prices have taken a hit following the breakout of the novel coronavirus, which originated in China and has been deemed a global health emergency. Quarantine measures and a wider slowdown in economic and industrial activity in the country have cut demand in this important region, putting significant strain on commodity markets. Although BHP expects the global economy to strengthen by between 3% and 3.5% this year, it warned those figures may have to be revised if the coronavirus is “not demonstrably-well contained” by the end of March. The firm said that “while it remains early days, it is clear there will be demand loss in oil and demand deferral in steel and copper”. The lasting impact of coronavirus is likely to depend on the speed of containment and China’s recovery, although BHP said it is “ready for whatever happens”.
sarkasm
19/2/2020
11:29
JP Morgan Cazenove Underweight but up from 1,860.00 to 1,890.00 Reiterates
sarkasm
18/2/2020
16:47
Glencore to shake up its top tier with younger leaders ‘Senior changes coming’ at commodities trader, says chief Glasenberg 22 minutes ago Only a handful of executives from the time of Glencore’s 2011 flotation are still at the company. Only a handful of executives from the time of Glencore’s 2011 flotation are still at the company. AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Email App Share to LinkedIn Glencore boss Ivan Glasenberg has said several more leadership changes are on the way as the miner and commodities trader makes the transition towards a new, younger generation of leaders in 2020. Speaking after the publication of annual results, which beat market expectations, Mr Glasenberg said the company was working on bringing through a fourth generation of leaders. “There will be a few senior changes coming,” Mr Glasenberg said, without giving further details. “As I have said, once the new generation is in place and ready to move on, it will also be time for me to move on.” In the almost half century that Glencore has traded commodities, the company has had just three chief executives, including its founder Marc Rich. Pressure Today, only a handful of executives from the time of Glencore’s 2011 flotation are still at the company. These include Mr Glasenberg, head of coal trading Tor Peterson, and Daniel Mate, who leads its zinc business. Bribery investigations by the UK’s Serious Fraud Office and the US Department of Justice have increased the pressure for more change at the top of the company, according to analysts and investors. They say the leading contenders to succeed Mr Glasenberg are: Gary Nagle, head of coal assets; Kenny Ives, who runs the nickel operations; and new copper boss Nico Paraskevas. Mr Nagle, a fast-talking South African, is the most similar to Mr Glasenberg - who once said his ideal replacement would be about 45 and look much like himself. Mr Glasenberg was speaking after Glencore announced a drop in annual profits. 2019 was a tough year for the company as it missed production guidance for its key commodities and faced a string of issues at its Africa copper business, which it is now starting to tackle. In addition, commodity prices fell because of uncertainty created by the US-China trade war. All that weighed on its share price, which dropped more than 20 per cent, underperforming the wider market and its peers. Learn more Glencore said adjusted earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation – the measure most closely followed by analysts – fell 26 per cent to $11.6 billion in the year to December on lower prices for its key commodities including copper, thermal coal and zinc. However, the result was ahead of market forecasts by about $400 million (€369 million). Revenue was $215 billion, down from $220 billion, while net debt increased to $17.6 billion, from $14.7 billion a year earlier, as Glencore was forced to add leading commitments to its balance sheet under new accounting rules. “Given we see a credible turnround in Africa. . .we don’t have too much concern over the balance sheet position today despite being slightly over the top end of the company’s desired level,” said Conor Rowley, analyst at Credit Suisse. After taking a string of impairment charges on assets, including copper mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia and Colombian coal businesses, Glencore recorded a loss for the year of just over $400 million. Assets Glencore said its Colombian coal assets had been hit by an oversupply of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the knock-on effect of weaker European demand. Its African copper mine Mutanda, which has been mothballed, suffered from low cobalt prices. The company declared a dividend of 20 cents a share, which will be paid in two equal instalments, but did not announce another share buyback programme. That would be on hold until net debt is around $14 billion to $15 billion, or about one times ebitda, Mr Glasenberg said. “We would like to do buybacks at some stage [in 2020] and if the free cash flow allows us to do it, we will do,” he said. Mr Glasenberg said Glencore was closely monitoring the coronavirus outbreak but it was too early to tell what impact it would have on growth in China and therefore commodities. Nonetheless, he said Glencore’s muscular trading arm, which is an important source of cash for the company, had enjoyed a good start to the year. “It is a bit too early in mid-February to start predicting exactly where [profits from the trading business] are going to be . . .but the year has started off fairly well,” he said. In a separate announcement, Glencore projected a 30 per cent reduction in its absolute Scope 3 emissions – which include those produced by its customers–- over the next 15 years. Mr Glasenberg said he expected the “depletionR21; of the company’s coal resource base in Colombia, and to a lesser extent, South Africa and Australia, to contribute to this reduction. “By 2035 we will not have any production in Colombia. [The] Cerrejón and Prodeco [mines] will not be running at that time.” Although Glencore has a large coal business, it already has lower Scope 3 emissions than many of its rivals such as BHP and Rio Tinto, which supply raw materials to China’s huge steelmaking industry. – Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2020
waldron
18/2/2020
14:13
On the turn
dround87
18/2/2020
13:33
BHP has lagged behind rivals such as Rio Tinto, which sold its last thermal coal mine in 2018. Buyers for its thermal assets, including Mount Arthur Coal and a third of Cerrejón in Colombia, are proving scarce. It may not want to make the same mistake with metallurgical coal, even if, for now, margins are sounder, and substitution is difficult.
loganair
18/2/2020
13:26
BHP's new chief executive Mike Henry has signalled the mining giant could exit thermal coal and boost exposure to minerals used in green technologies as it looks to reposition itself for a lower carbon world. In his first detailed comments about the implications of a "decarbonised" future for BHP, Mr Henry said he would consider a sale of the company's thermal coal assets "if someone presented us with an opportunity to exit for value". It would also pursue growth in nickel and copper, which will be increasingly needed to power green technologies, he said. Mr Henry said BHP was continuously reviewing the make-up of its portfolio and determined thermal coal – coal used to generate electricity – posed "downside" risks when it mapped out future scenarios such as the global transition to cleaner energy. Morgans analyst Adrian Prendergast said Mr Henry's remarks were reflective of a trend of businesses – even resources companies – recognising and responding to the power of the decarbonisation push globally. "Businesses are starting to rapidly implement at a higher, overarching level, strategic decisions to decarbonise rapidly ... divesting assets that are carbon-intensive," Mr Prendergast said. Finding a buyer of BHP's thermal coal mines, however, could prove challenging owing to the weak coal prices and a lack of interest in picking up emissions-intensive assets in a market under pressure, Mr Prendergast said. "The third factor is they would likely want to find a responsible bidder, and put the assets into the hands of a company that would look after them and wouldn't disadvantage stakeholders," he said. Discussing the future of BHP's portfolio, which is dominated by the steelmaking ingredients of iron ore and metallurgical coal, Mr Henry said he wanted to develop more growth options in its "future facing" commodities such as copper – used in wind turbines – and nickel – which is needed to make lithium-ion batteries. "We need more copper and we need more nickel. We do have some growth ahead of us in both of those commodities but I think to the far future and we'd like to have more options." Although a producer of fossil fuels, BHP has adopted a strong focus on sustainability and mitigating the long-term risks to its business posed by climate change.
loganair
18/2/2020
10:23
Https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/glencore-sees-carbon-emissions-falling-as-coal-mines-fade-away-1.1391633 Glencore Sees Carbon Emissions Falling as Coal Mines Fade Away Thomas Biesheuvel, Bloomberg News A bucket wheel excavates soil and rocks as a giant excavator operates at the open pit lignite mine, operated by RWE AG, in Hambach, Germany, on Monday, Aug. 13, 2018. Not far from Germany’s Rhine River, a fight to thwart giant excavators from grinding away what’s left of the 1,200-year-old Hambach forest came to a head this month as thousands of protesters faced off with police in a tense, and at times violent, showdown. Photographer: Alex Kraus/Bloomberg A bucket wheel excavates soil and rocks as a giant excavator operates at the open pit lignite mine, operated by RWE AG, in Hambach, Germany, on Monday, Aug. 13, 2018. Not far from Germany’s Rhine River, a fight to thwart giant excavators from grinding away what’s left of the 1,200-year-old Hambach forest came to a head this month as thousands of protesters faced off with police in a tense, and at times violent, showdown. Photographer: Alex Kraus/Bloomberg , Bloomberg (Bloomberg) -- Glencore Plc, the world’s biggest shipper of thermal coal, has mapped out cuts in carbon emissions generated by its customers as the company slowly retreats from the dirtiest fuel. The world’s biggest resource companies, from miners to oil majors, are under increasing pressure to account for the pollution created when their customers burn or process the materials they produce. Glencore said on Tuesday its so-called Scope 3 emissions will fall by 30% in the next 15 years, predominantly as a result of depleting mines in Colombia and South Africa. That’s a projection based on its current mine plans, rather than a fixed target. Glencore did not say how much coal production would be cut to meet the projection. Glencore has faced the brunt of a growing investor concern about climate change. While its biggest rivals are in the process of exiting coal, Glencore has been a staunch defender of the fuel, saying it’s essential to providing affordable and reliable power in developing countries. Still, the commodity trader’s billionaire chief executive officer, Ivan Glasenberg, has been forced to make concessions to keep investors. Last year, Glencore agreed to cap coal production, albeit above its current output level. The mining industry has yet to find common ground on how to deal with scope 3 emissions. BHP Group in July called on the mining sector to take ownership of emissions that result from product sales, a stance that’s been rejected by some rivals who argue it’s too difficult to calculate a supplier’s share. Rio Tinto Group is partnering with a Chinese steelmaker to develop methods to cut pollution and improve the steel industry’s environmental performance, while Vale SA has said it will develop ambitious targets to cut Scope 3 emissions. Arguably, the Scope 3 emissions of the oil industry are even more difficult to calculate. That hasn’t stopped companies like Repsol SA and BP Plc from setting net-zero emissions targets for all the oil and gas they extract and their customers burn. Glencore said the reduction in emissions will derive mainly from its Colombian coal assets, and to a lesser extent from its South African and Australian mines. The Colombian market is currently under pressure as it predominantly ships to Europe where countries are cutting their use of the fuel, while South Africa has challenges with labor relations and government policies. “Our capital expenditure reflects significant current investments towards growth in production of battery and conductive materials required for the transition to a lower carbon economy,” Glencore said in the statement. --With assistance from Akshat Rathi. To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Biesheuvel in London at tbiesheuvel@bloomberg.net To contact the editors responsible for this story: Lynn Thomasson at lthomasson@bloomberg.net, Dylan Griffiths, Nicholas Larkin
maywillow
18/2/2020
10:12
In an interview BHP saying they want to get more into commodities that are “future-facing metals” naming Copper, Nickel and Pot Ash while wishing to divest themselves of Energy/Thermal Coal. BHP did not mention anything about metallurgical coal for making steel.
loganair
18/2/2020
09:37
Analysts at Shore Capital said the results were "slightly" ahead of their expectations and "significantly" ahead of consensus.
loganair
17/2/2020
23:45
Australian mining giant BHP's profit soared nearly 40 per cent on the back of the boom in the price of steelmaking commodity iron ore, but warns demand could be affected by the deadly coronavirus outbreak in its biggest customer base, China. The first set of results delivered by BHP's new chief executive Mike Henry after he took the reins of the world's biggest miner in January 1 showed underlying half-year profit had soared 39 per cent to $US5.2 billion ($7.8 billion), broadly in line with analyst consensus. The bumper profit comes after an extraordinary run for the price of the steelmaking commodity iron ore, BHP’s biggest cash generator and Australia's top export, following strong demand from Chinese steel mills coupled with a global supply shortage last year. BHP declared its biggest-ever half-year dividend of US65¢. The dividend was lower than analyst forecasts of US71¢. BHP said it had taken a "cautious approach" in light of the near-term volatility posed by coronavirus. BHP is facing a period of uncertainty in the wake of the deadly coronavirus outbreak which has locked down plants and shipping ports in China, disrupting key supply chains for the resources sector, but Mr Henry expressed confidence in the miner's resilience. He said the human toll from the deadly virus was "tragic" but the the economic hit would be "muted" if the virus was contained by March 31. "Despite near term uncertainty – due to the coronavirus outbreak, trade policy and geopolitics – we remain convinced about the positive underlying fundamentals of our commodities," he said on Tuesday. "We see enormous potential to reliably deliver exceptional financial and operational performance, and to grow value and returns." Mr Henry said BHP had delivered a strong set of half-year results, grounded in solid operational performance. "BHP is in good shape. We have passionate and committed people hungry to perform," he said. "We have brought together high quality assets in a simple portfolio that allows us to create value at scale."
loganair
17/2/2020
23:36
Good looking results. Hopefully an UP day tomorrow.Interim dividend up 18%
gateside
17/2/2020
16:59
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 86.39USD 1.53(1.77%) Gold COMEX 1,584.70 -0.11% Silver COMEX 17.77 +0.20% Platinum NYMEX 973.70 +0.51% Copper COMEX 2.63 +1.04% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 57.35 +0.05% Gasoline NYMEX 1.73 +0.39% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.94 +4.36% (WTI) 52.1 USD -0.02% Rio Tinto 4,212.5 +0.37% Bhp 1,691.6 +0.98% Anglo American 2,103.5 +0.48% Glencore 236.65 +1.15%
waldron
17/2/2020
11:37
3 stocks I’ll be buying if the market crashes: “Be greedy when others are fearful.” This Warren Buffett quote captures the US billionaire’s approach to investing. When the market crashes, you’ll usually find him buying up good businesses at bargain prices. I share Buffett’s view that market crashes can provide great buying opportunities. I think the secret is to focus your cash on companies that offer essential products and have long track records. These normally recover quite quickly. Today, I want to look at three companies I’d hope to buy in the next market crash. Essential resources: Another sector where I’d be keen to buy during market crashes is the natural resources sector – oil and mining. These may be unfashionable, but the world economy remains heavily reliant on supplies of raw materials such as copper, iron ore, oil and gas. One company that provides all of these at scale is BHP Group (LSE: BHP). This Anglo-Australian firm reported revenue of £44bn last year, on which it made a profit of £8.3bn. I already own a few of these shares, which currently offer a dividend yield of 6.4%. This tasty income attracts me, but I’m aware profit margins are at the top end of the historic range achieved by the group. A global slowdown could cause commodity prices to fall, cutting into BHP’s profits. Indeed, forecasts for 2020/21 suggest the group’s earnings will fall by 10% over the coming year. I remain happy to hold BHP and wouldn’t mind buying more. But I’m saving myself for the next big slump, when I hope to buy big at much lower prices.
loganair
17/2/2020
07:55
BHP Goldman Sachs Neutral 1,750.00 - Reiterates
florenceorbis
14/2/2020
17:03
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 84.86 USD -0.28(-0.33%) Gold COMEX 1,584.80 +0.38% Silver COMEX 17.73 +0.63% Platinum NYMEX 967.40 -0.75% Copper COMEX 2.60 -0.54% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 56.97 +1.12% Gasoline NYMEX 1.72 -0.20% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.86 +0.05% WTI 51.85 USD +0.86% Rio Tinto 4,197 -0.51% Bhp 1,675.2 -1.14% Anglo American 2,093.5 -1.81% Glencore 233.95 -1.62%
waldron
13/2/2020
17:45
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 85.14USD 0.67(0.79%) Gold COMEX 1,579.50 +0.50% Silver COMEX 17.63 +0.73% Platinum NYMEX 974.20 +0.71% Copper COMEX 2.62 +0.60% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 56.32 +0.95% Gasoline NYMEX 1.74 +0.67% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.87 -0.21% WTI 51.62 USD +0.31% Rio Tinto 4,218.5 -1.04% Bhp 1,694.6 -0.70% Anglo American 2,132 -1.00% Glencore 237.8 -0.44%
waldron
12/2/2020
17:10
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 84.47 USD 1.11(1.31%) Gold COMEX 1,572.70 +0.17% Silver COMEX 17.52 -0.44% Platinum NYMEX 969.40 -0.42% Copper COMEX 2.60 +0.74% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 55.90 +3.50% Gasoline NYMEX 1.72 +3.35% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.86 +2.25% WTI 51.22 USD +2.19% Rio Tinto 4,263 +2.66% Bhp 1,706.6 +2.04% Anglo American 2,153.5 +4.92% Glencore 238.85 +2.36%
waldron
11/2/2020
17:57
BHP Is Now The World’s Top Copper Miner By MINING.com - Feb 11, 2020, 11:30 AM CST Copper BHP Group on Monday became the world’s largest copper miner based on production after Chile’s copper commission announced a slide in output at state-owned Codelco. close [x] Remaining Time -0:42 Hampered by declining grades Codelco production declined by 5.6 percent or about 100,000 tonnes last year. Overall, Codelco, nationalized in the early 1970s, churned out 1.706 million tonnes of copper, the lowest level since 2008, when output was at 1.55 million tonnes. At that time, the giant Ministro Hales mine, which contributes between 180,000 and 200,000 tonnes of copper a year, had not yet begun operation. Last month, the world’s number one mining company, BHP (NYSE:BHP) reported robust six months to end December numbers from its copper operations, including at Escondida in Chile, the world’s largest copper mine. For the first six months of BHP’s financial year, output was up 7 percent year on year to 885,000 tonnes with Escondida contributing more than 600,000 tonnes. In the six-months to end-June 2019, Melbourne-based BHP produced 864,000 tonnes bring the calendar year output to 1.749 million tonnes. The Anglo-Australian giant kept guidance for its 2020 financial year unchanged at between 1.705 million and 1.820 million tonnes. BHP may struggle to hang onto the crown despite spending $2.5 billion to expand its Spence mine in Chile. Freeport-McMoranR17;s Grasberg mine in Indonesia returns to full production after a transition to underground mining in 2022. US-based Freeport produced 1.47 million tonnes of copper in 2019. Codelco itself is in the midst of an ambitious, 10-year, $39 billion investment drive to open new projects and overhaul older mines so it may well catch up too. By Mining.com More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:
waldron
11/2/2020
17:04
Https://markets.businessinsider.com/commodities/iron-ore-price Iron Ore 83.36 USD 2.11(2.53%) Gold COMEX 1,568.40 -0.70% Silver COMEX 17.56 -1.27% Platinum NYMEX 974.00 +0.73% Copper COMEX 2.59 +1.47% Brent Crude Oil NYMEX 54.09 +1.54% Gasoline NYMEX 1.67 +0.47% Natural Gas NYMEX 1.81 +0.33% WTI 50.02 USD +0.46% Rio Tinto 4,152.5 +0.73% Bhp 1,672.4 +0.93% Anglo American 2,052.5 +1.86% Glencore 233.35 +1.63%
waldron
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