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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Bhp Group Plc LSE:BHP London Ordinary Share GB00BH0P3Z91 ORD $0.50
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  58.40 3.44% 1,757.00 4,006,623 16:35:28
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
1,758.60 1,759.00 1,763.60 1,705.60 1,710.00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 34,658.11 10,906.60 126.99 15.0 37,109
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
18:28:07 O 87,240 1,754.071 GBX

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DateSubject
01/12/2020
08:20
Bhp Daily Update: Bhp Group Plc is listed in the Mining sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BHP. The last closing price for Bhp was 1,698.60p.
Bhp Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 1,488.60p and a 12 week average price of 1,450p.
The 1 year high share price is 1,873p while the 1 year low share price is currently 939.80p.
There are currently 2,112,071,796 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 6,449,837 shares. The market capitalisation of Bhp Group Plc is £37,109,101,455.72.
01/12/2020
06:51
the grumpy old men: BHP seals deal with Shell to fuel LNG-powered ship fleet December 1, 2020 — 4.10pm Mining giant BHP has awarded Shell a landmark contract to supply fuel for the world's first fleet of liquefied natural gas-powered Newcastlemax bulk carriers as it seeks to lower shipping emissions. As part of the company's pledge to slash emissions across its supply chain, BHP this year said it would charter five vessels from Eastern Pacific Shipping, powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) instead of bunker fuel, to carry 10 million tonnes of iron ore a year from Australia to China from 2022. BHP has awarded Shell a contract to fuel the world's first fleet of LNG-powered bulk carriers. BHP has awarded Shell a contract to fuel the world's first fleet of LNG-powered bulk carriers.Credit:Robert Peet Using carriers powered by LNG rather than diesel would eliminate NOx (nitrogen oxide) and SOx (sulphur oxide) emissions, and sharply reduce carbon dioxide emissions, according to the miner. BHP chief commercial officer Vandita Pant said awarding the contract to Shell marked a significant step in the company's ambitions of reducing the carbon footprint across its shipping supply chain. "LNG-fuelled vessels are forecast to help BHP reduce carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions by 30 per cent on a per-voyage basis compared to a conventional fuelled voyage between WA and China, and contribute to our 2030 goal to support 40 per cent emissions-intensity reduction of BHP-chartered shipping of our products," Ms Pant said. BHP 'sets new bar' with carbon cuts targeting steel mills, shippers The contract, which BHP said was the result of a tender process including several potential LNG suppliers, comes as the resources industry faces pressure from some of the world's biggest investors to expand their carbon-reduction ambitions to take responsibility for emissions caused by the transport and end-use of their resources around the world, known as "Scope 3" emissions. BHP earlier this year became the first major resources company to commit to Scope 3 targets, aiming for a 30 per cent reduction in the emissions intensity of customers like steel mills and power plants that purchase their products, as well as the 40 per cent cut across its chartered shipping. Shell Energy executive vice-president Steve Hill congratulated BHP on reducing emissions in their maritime supply chain with the world's first LNG-fuelled Newcastlemax bulk carriers. "Decarbonisation of the shipping industry must begin today and LNG is the cleanest fuel currently available in meaningful volumes," he said. "This LNG bunkering contract strengthens the bunkering market in the region and we look forward to working with BHP and other customers in the maritime sector on their journey to a net-zero emissions future." In the shipping industry's biggest overhaul in decades, new emissions standards were introduced this year slashing sulphur levels permitted in maritime fuel. The changes prompted exporters including BHP to seek out cleaner alternatives to heavy fuel known as bunker fuel, which, until now, has been the shipping industry's main fuel source. The United Nations International Maritime Organisation has also set goals to halve carbon dioxide emissions generated by shipping by 2050 compared to 2008 levels. Mining BHP Billiton Nick Toscano Business reporter for The Age and Sydney Morning Herald.
06/11/2020
20:49
ariane: BHP ups stake in Shenzi oil and gas field to 72% MINING.com Editor | November 6, 2020 | 12:04 pm Energy Top Companies Latin America Oil & Gas Shenzi development. Image from BHP. BHP (NYSE: BHP) announced Friday that it has completed the transaction to acquire an additional 28% working interest in Shenzi from Hess Corporation for $505 million. The deepwater Shenzi oil and gas field lies in the Gulf of Mexico and holds estimated recoverable reserves of between 350 million and 400 million barrels of oil equivalent, although additional potential reserves will be targeted for follow-up development, Offshore Technology reported. Sign Up for the Energy Digest The transaction brings BHP’s working interest to 72% and adds approximately 11,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day of production (90% oil) as of the transaction closing date of November 6. Total petroleum production guidance for the 2021 financial year of between 95 and 102 MMboe will be updated at the second quarter Operational Review, released January 20, 2021, to reflect the additional production from Shenzi and other operational updates such as Gulf of Mexico hurricane impacts, BHP said in a media release. Shenzi is a six-lease development and is structured as joint ownership; BHP has a 72% interest and Repsol S.A. has 28% interest.
24/10/2020
00:59
gibbs1: BHP extends PPA with SCE for mining operations in Australia MiningPowerNickel By NS Energy Staff Writer 23 Oct 2020 The PPA that has been extended for 15 years has scope to include renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and waste-to-energy BHP BHP extends PPA with SCE to power its Western Australia operations. (Credit: BHP.) TransAlta Renewables announced that its subsidiary Southern Cross Energy has extended its current power purchase agreement (PPA) with BHP Billiton Nickel West (BHP) with respect to the 245MW generating facilities in the Goldfields region of Western Australia. The extension replaces the previous PPA which is scheduled to expire on December 31, 2023. With the new agreement, the PPA will be on force till 2038, supplying Nickel West all the electricity generated by SCE. With the extended PPA, BHP will be able to include renewable energy such as solar and wind along with energy storage, to meet its emissions reduction targets. Study phases are underway for an 18.5MW solar plant at Nickel West’s Leinster and Mount Keith operations, along with a battery energy storage system. The evaluation also includes a 17MW waste heat steam turbine system at the Kalgoorlie Smelter to supply low-emissions energy from furnace heat recovery. Adding renewable energy could help reduce Nickel West’s emissions by 15% The two renewable energy projects could reduce Nickel West’s Scope 2 electricity greenhouse gas emissions by up to 15% by 2023, based on 2020 levels. BHP targets a 30% reduction in carbon emissions from 2020 levels by 2030, with a long-term target of net zero operational emissions by 2050. Nickel West asset president Eduard Haegel said: “The PPA also provided Nickel West with the additional ability to integrate renewable electricity generation, including solar and wind, with energy storage technologies to meet its emissions reduction targets and deliver lower carbon, sustainable nickel to its customers.” “These projects contribute to the first phase of our emissions reduction strategy, as we continue to evaluate plans for additional renewable energy supply to decarbonise our nickel operations. “We are at the beginning of an energy revolution that will transform our world and materially increase demand for nickel. BHP Nickel West is well placed to provide our nickel units sustainably, and with one of the lowest carbon footprints.”
18/8/2020
13:18
la forge: BHP Group Ltd. left its guidance and production figures unchanged for all commodities as it reported fiscal 2020 results Tuesday. However, the world's largest listed miner by market value said it will seek to exit its thermal coal business to focus more on higher-quality coking coal, which is used in steelmaking. The Melbourne-headquartered miner was also cautious on the outlook for the commodities it mines, saying that while the initial demand shock due to Covid-19 has likely passed, possible second waves provide a level of uncertainty for the year ahead. Metallurgical & Energy Coal: BHP said it will seek to focus on higher-quality coking coals and exit its thermal coal business. The miner's thermal coal activities have been a target of environmentalists concerned about BHP's contribution to climate change. BHP said energy coal prices look challenging as the growth of coal power energy will be slower than global population growth. What's more, BHP expects coal power to lose out to renewable energy in both China and the rest of the world. In contrast, while metallurgical coal prices fell sharply as Covid-19 sapped demand in China, BHP predicts a "sustained improvement in prices" in the second half of 2021. "Over time, premium-quality coking coals are expected to be particularly advantaged given the drive by steelmakers to improve blast furnace productivity, partly to reduce emissions intensity," BHP said. Iron Ore: Iron ore prices have been rising since a mine dam collapse at Brumadinho, Brazil in 2019, with strong Chinese demand pushing prices to six-year highs. BHP said, however, that Chinese demand is likely to slow in the second half of 2020 as crude steel production, which uses iron ore, plateaus, while new supply of iron ore from West Africa is increasingly likely. Both factors would weigh on prices. "This implies that it will be even more important to create competitive advantage and to grow value through driving exceptional operational performance," the miner said. Copper: BHP said the pandemic will delay an anticipated deficit in the copper market to the mid to late 2020s and that, in the longer term, demand will be solid and prices would rise thanks to declining copper grades, higher input costs, and a lack of new mine exploration. Write to Will Horner at william.horner@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires August 18, 2020 06:19 ET (10:19 GMT)
18/8/2020
05:59
waldron: TOP NEWS: BHP Lowers Dividend As Revenue Falls Short Of Consensus Tue, 18th Aug 2020 05:15 Alliance News (Alliance News) - Anglo-Australian mining firm BHP Group PLC said Tuesday it lowered its annual dividend, as profit and revenue declined on lower prices and an increase in the closure of mines and rehabilitation provisions, as a result of Covid-19. For the year to the end of June, pretax profit dropped by 10% to USD13.51 billion from USD15.05 billion the year before, as revenue declined by 4.3% to USD42.39 billion from USD44.29 billion. BHP's revenue performance came in short of company-compiled expectations, which stood at USD43.07 billion. Profit from operations decreased by 11% to USD14.42 billion from USD16.11 billion the prior year, while underlying earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation slipped by 5% to USD22.07 billion from USD23.16 billion. The underlying Ebitda was just ahead of consensus expectations, which had the figure at USD22.01 billion. BHP said its performance was hurt by lower prices, particularly in coal, copper and petroleum, lower volumes including a decline in copper grades and petroleum fields, and a rise in the closure and rehabilitation provisions for closed mines. BHP declared an annual dividend of 120 US cents, down 10% from 130 cents the year before, as net debt as at June 30 was USD12.04 billion, up 28% year-on-year from USD9.45 billion. Looking ahead, BHP said it expects petroleum output for its current financial year to be in the range of 95 million to 102 million barrels of oil equivalent, reflecting a 6% to 13% fall from 109 million barrels of oil equivalent produced for the 2020 financial year. Copper production is set to be between 1.48 million and 1.65 million tonnes, a 5% to 14% drop from 1.72 million tonnes. Iron ore output is expected to be between 244 million and 253 million tonnes, reflecting a 2% drop to 2% rise from 248 million tonnes produced in the 2020 financial year. The metallurgical coal forecast is between 40 million and 44 million tonnes, marking a 3% fall to 7% increase from 41 million tonnes. Finally, energy coal is expected to be between 22 million to 24 million tonnes, reflecting a 5% drop to 4% increase from 23 million tonnes. "BHP delivered a strong set of results for the 2020 financial year that reflect the strength, resilience and quality of our people and our portfolio. In a year marked by the challenges of the global Covid-19 pandemic, social unrest in Chile and commodity price volatility, we were safer, more reliable and lower cost," said Chief Executive Officer Mike Henry. "We are moving to concentrate our coal portfolio on high quality coking coals, with greatest potential upside for quality premiums as steel makers seek to improve blast furnace utilisation and reduce emissions intensity. In oil and gas, we will continue to invest in opportunities that are resilient under a range of price scenarios, and which are aligned to our strengths. We will seek to divest oil and gas assets that are mature or which are likely to realise greater value under different ownership," Henry added. Shares in BHP were marginally higher at AUD39.87 on Tuesday in Sydney. By Dayo Laniyan; dayolaniyan@alliancenews.com
16/8/2020
07:34
misca2: THE GUARDIAN Observer business agenda BHP Who’s in the bigger hole when an ethical investor divests from BHP? The mining giant releases full-year results this week, but Britain’s biggest pension fund will no longer care Simon Goodley Sun 16 Aug 2020 00.05 BST At this point in history, time does not appear to have been especially kind to the views of the famed economist Milton Friedman. He may be one of the few recipients of the Nobel memorial prize in economic sciences that non-dismal scientists can actually name (others might be Friedrich Hayek, Joseph Stiglitz, Paul Krugman and, ahem, President Josiah Bartlet from The West Wing) but one of his most famous ideas is looking somewhat dated. In 1970, Friedman memorably wrote in a New York Times article that businesses existed purely to make money for shareholders, and that executives drivelling on about being “socially responsible” were “preaching pure and unadulterated socialism”. It was powerful stuff, which basically set the tone for US capitalism for 50 years. But it seems slightly less powerful now. Almost exactly a year ago, some of the highest-paid executives on the planet appeared to ditch Friedman’s idea of shareholder primacy as they attempted to convince their publics that they thought customers, employees, suppliers and communities might matter a little bit too. And this week will see another small landmark for that resistance, with the full-year results of the major miner BHP. Nest says that it is 'looking purely at the investment case' and that 'climate change risk is investment risk' The event will be notable as it showcases the performance of a company that, despite being one of the largest on the London Stock Exchange, can no longer boast of having the UK’s largest pension fund on its shareholder register. The government-backed National Employment Savings Trust (Nest), which, with 9 million members, is the most popular pension fund in the country, is divesting from fossil fuels in what climate campaigners have hailed as a landmark move for the industry. The self-imposed ban on holding such shares means that some of the world’s biggest mining companies, such as BHP, cannot be part of Nest’s future holdings, at least as long they derive profits from mining coal. This month, Nest sold its final BHP share. Friedman would have probably been pretty cross about all that, not least because what really got him grinding his teeth were business executives believing that they were “defending free enterprise” while also “promoting desirable ‘social’ ends”. Fifty years on, that is precisely what the promoters seem to be doing. Nest says that it is “looking purely at the investment case” and that “climate change risk is investment risk”, with shareholders possibly finding themselves stranded with assets that turn out to be worthless if they are reliant on burning fossil fuels. The Bank of England has said that as much as $20 trillion (£16tn) of assets could be wiped out by the climate crisis if it is not effectively addressed. Business Today: sign up for a morning shot of financial news Read more Meanwhile, folk who like to study these things will tell you that there is no evidence that buying ethical shares makes any difference to financial performance. They point you to the FTSE4Good – the City’s version of an ethical index – which pretty well matches the returns of the FTSE All Share. And yet the ghost of Friedman might say this reasoning is flawed, and that they would be better to stick with the do-gooder argument. If you compare the performance of FTSE4Good with, say, BHP shares, it would not just be a grizzled old economist who’d prefer to have the miner’s stock in their pension pot. Equally, one might wonder if the FTSE4Good is really so angelic a punt. Its 13th most significant stock just happens to be, er … BHP.
15/8/2020
09:21
la forge: NSENERGY Shareholders ask BHP to put activities near Australian cultural heritage sites on standby Mining By Andrew Fawthrop 13 Aug 2020 Amid growing concerns over the protection of native and aboriginal heritage sites in Australia, BHP has been asked to pause a planned mine expansion until legislation is reformed BHP iron ore western australia BHP plans to expand its iron ore operations in Western Australia (Credit: BHP) A shareholder group called on BHP to halt any mining activities that could damage cultural heritage sites in Australia “until relevant laws are strengthened”. The resolution – submitted today (13 August) by the Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR) – follows the destruction in May of the 46,000-year-old Juukan Gorge aboriginal cave shelters by miner Rio Tinto in Western Australia. It calls on BHP, one of the world’s largest mining companies, to introduce a moratorium on operations that would “disturb, destroy or desecrate cultural heritage sites” in the country until legislation to protect these regions has been reformed. The company currently holds permits to expand a mining project that could potentially disrupt up to 40 locations designated to be culturally significant to an aboriginal group in Western Australia. ACCR’s resolution is supported by the First Nations Heritage Protection Alliance, a coalition of more than 20 indigenous organisations from across Australia, representing every major aboriginal or native group in the country. BHP has vowed not to disturb Pilbara cultural heritage sites without ‘extensive consultation’ with land owners Following the Juukan Gorge incident – for which Rio Tinto has since apologised and faced a parliamentary enquiry into its actions – pressure has mounted for an accelerated reform of heritage-protection laws. Western Australia’s Aboriginal Heritage Act has not been updated since 1972 and is currently in the process of being redrafted. “Investors simply can’t stand by and allow another Juukan Gorge disaster to take place,” said ACCR executive director Brynn O’Brien. “Investors in BHP have the opportunity to ensure the company takes a cautious, best-practice approach in dealing with indigenous cultural heritage, by issuing a moratorium on any further destruction until laws are strengthened. “We believe it’s necessary that this shareholder resolution receives strong support – or is proactively adopted by BHP’s board – because there is far too much at stake to allow any further destruction of indigenous cultural sites.” In May, BHP secured permits to expand its South Flank iron ore project in Pilbara, Western Australia, in a region that is home to 40 cultural heritage sites linked to the Banjima aboriginal group. Despite the miner’s insistence that it “will not disturb the sites identified without further extensive consultation with the Banjima people”, the ACCR has pressed BHP to formalise this commitment by adopting the resolution. “Decisions about cultural heritage should be based on principles, not on a PR response to a crisis,” said O’Brien. In addition to the moratorium, the shareholder motion calls on BHP to remove “gag orders” preventing aboriginal land owners from speaking publicly about activities on their land, as well as for greater disclosure on the lobbying efforts of industry associations to which it belongs on issues of cultural heritage. ACCR calls for fresh review of trade-association memberships In a separate resolution, the ACCR also asks BHP to review the activity of its trade associations, and to suspend its membership with any that are found to be lobbying for Covid-19 stimulus measures that are inconsistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement. Such advocacy might include fast-tracked approvals for fossil-fuel projects or “aggressive deregulation”, according to ACCR director of climate and the environment Dan Gocher. “Global leaders have a once in a generation opportunity to accelerate decarbonisation through widespread economic stimulus measures,” he added. “If BHP is unwilling or unable to ensure that its industry associations support that transition, then it must suspend its membership.” Last year, more than a quarter of BHP shareholders voted in favour of a resolution calling for the miner to end its membership of trade associations that have lobbied for policies inconsistent with the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement. BHP has pledged to invest $400m over five years to develop technologies that will help it lower its emissions footprint, with a target of reaching net zero by 2050.
14/8/2020
08:28
grupo guitarlumber: Shareholders ask BHP to put activities near Australian cultural heritage sites on standby Mining By Andrew Fawthrop 13 Aug 2020 Amid growing concerns over the protection of native and aboriginal heritage sites in Australia, BHP has been asked to pause a planned mine expansion until legislation is reformed BHP iron ore western australia BHP plans to expand its iron ore operations in Western Australia (Credit: BHP) A shareholder group called on BHP to halt any mining activities that could damage cultural heritage sites in Australia “until relevant laws are strengthened”. The resolution – submitted today (13 August) by the Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR) – follows the destruction in May of the 46,000-year-old Juukan Gorge aboriginal cave shelters by miner Rio Tinto in Western Australia. It calls on BHP, one of the world’s largest mining companies, to introduce a moratorium on operations that would “disturb, destroy or desecrate cultural heritage sites” in the country until legislation to protect these regions has been reformed. The company currently holds permits to expand a mining project that could potentially disrupt up to 40 locations designated to be culturally significant to an aboriginal group in Western Australia. ACCR’s resolution is supported by the First Nations Heritage Protection Alliance, a coalition of more than 20 indigenous organisations from across Australia, representing every major aboriginal or native group in the country. BHP has vowed not to disturb Pilbara cultural heritage sites without ‘extensive consultation’ with land owners Following the Juukan Gorge incident – for which Rio Tinto has since apologised and faced a parliamentary enquiry into its actions – pressure has mounted for an accelerated reform of heritage-protection laws. Western Australia’s Aboriginal Heritage Act has not been updated since 1972 and is currently in the process of being redrafted. “Investors simply can’t stand by and allow another Juukan Gorge disaster to take place,” said ACCR executive director Brynn O’Brien. “Investors in BHP have the opportunity to ensure the company takes a cautious, best-practice approach in dealing with indigenous cultural heritage, by issuing a moratorium on any further destruction until laws are strengthened. “We believe it’s necessary that this shareholder resolution receives strong support – or is proactively adopted by BHP’s board – because there is far too much at stake to allow any further destruction of indigenous cultural sites.” In May, BHP secured permits to expand its South Flank iron ore project in Pilbara, Western Australia, in a region that is home to 40 cultural heritage sites linked to the Banjima aboriginal group. Despite the miner’s insistence that it “will not disturb the sites identified without further extensive consultation with the Banjima people”, the ACCR has pressed BHP to formalise this commitment by adopting the resolution. “Decisions about cultural heritage should be based on principles, not on a PR response to a crisis,” said O’Brien. In addition to the moratorium, the shareholder motion calls on BHP to remove “gag orders” preventing aboriginal land owners from speaking publicly about activities on their land, as well as for greater disclosure on the lobbying efforts of industry associations to which it belongs on issues of cultural heritage. ACCR calls for fresh review of trade-association memberships In a separate resolution, the ACCR also asks BHP to review the activity of its trade associations, and to suspend its membership with any that are found to be lobbying for Covid-19 stimulus measures that are inconsistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement. Such advocacy might include fast-tracked approvals for fossil-fuel projects or “aggressive deregulation”, according to ACCR director of climate and the environment Dan Gocher. “Global leaders have a once in a generation opportunity to accelerate decarbonisation through widespread economic stimulus measures,” he added. “If BHP is unwilling or unable to ensure that its industry associations support that transition, then it must suspend its membership.” Last year, more than a quarter of BHP shareholders voted in favour of a resolution calling for the miner to end its membership of trade associations that have lobbied for policies inconsistent with the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement. BHP has pledged to invest $400m over five years to develop technologies that will help it lower its emissions footprint, with a target of reaching net zero by 2050.
22/6/2020
06:43
maywillow: podgyted 22 Jun '20 - 07:21 - 3923 of 3923 0 1 0 hTTps://www.fool.com.au/2020/06/22/iron-ore-prices-are-the-rio-tinto-fortescue-and-bhp-share-prices-a-buy/ the Rio Tinto and BHP share price represent good long-term value at today’s prices. Both shares are within 15% of its recent highs and pay a moderate dividend yield of around 6%. The Rio Tinto and BHP share price appear good value at today's prices.
21/4/2020
07:18
grupo guitarlumber: SYDNEY--BHP Group Ltd. is reviewing spending plans for the 2021 fiscal year as the coronavirus pandemic disrupts operations producing commodities from copper to coal. BHP said capital and exploration expenditure in fiscal 2021, which begins in July, would be lower than the US$8 billion that management had originally signalled. A year-long delay to the Scarborough natural gas development offshore Australia has already been announced, and BHP said there was another US$200 million in non-committed spending on petroleum projects that could be deferred. Like many global resources companies, BHP is facing the twin threat of weakening demand for commodities as global economic activity slows with changes to the way it operates mine sites across the world. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, BHP has reduced the number of people on site at its mines, including halving its contractor workforce in Chile where it runs the Escondida and Spence copper pits. "While demand in China has strengthened in recent weeks, we expect other major economies, including the U.S., Europe and India, to contract sharply in the June 2020 quarter," Chief Executive Mike Henry said. "The situation remains fluid, however, with our strong financial position and low-cost operations, our business is resilient, with capacity to generate solid cash flow through his period and emerge well placed as the global economy recovers." BHP said it produced 60 million metric tons of iron ore in the three months through March, up 7% on the same period a year ago. Volumes were kept high despite a tropical cyclone that tore through Western Australia and travel restrictions that disrupted its use of fly in-fly out workers. On Tuesday, management stuck with annual guidance for between 242 million tons and 253 million tons from its Pilbara operations. BHP's Australian iron-ore shipments account for almost one-fifth of seaborne trade in the commodity. It is the world's third-largest iron-ore exporter, behind Vale SA and Rio Tinto PLC. However, BHP said annual production guidance for some other divisions is under review. In copper, BHP said it is assessing the impact of the temporary suspension of its Antamina operation in Peru as a result of coronavirus restrictions. Energy coal output guidance is also being reviewed after the Cerrejón mine was placed on temporary care and maintenance due to the pandemic. BHP said third-quarter output of petroleum products fell by 13% on-year to 25 million barrels of oil equivalent. That reflected the impact of Tropical Cyclone Damien on the North West Shelf gas-export facility in Australia in early February, which led management to signal that annual petroleum output would be at the lower end of fiscal 2020 guidance of between 110 million barrels and 116 million barrels. "Potential impacts from Covid-19, including weakness in customer demand, in the June 2020 quarter represent possible downside risk to full year guidance," BHP said on Tuesday. Quarterly copper output totaled 425,000 tons. BHP said first production from an expansion of its Spence copper mine could be pushed back by a few months after fewer workers were allowed on site. Write to David Winning at david.winning@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires April 20, 2020 19:17 ET (23:17 GMT)
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