Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Transense Tech. LSE:TRT London Ordinary Share GB00BDHDTH21 ORD 50P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 93.50p 92.00p 95.00p 93.50p 93.50p 93.50p 0.00 07:50:40
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Automobiles & Parts 5.1 1.6 0.3 359.6 8.83

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Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
08/12/2016 12:56:1494.852,5002,371.25O
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DateSubject
09/12/2016
08:20
Transense Technologies Daily Update: Transense Tech. is listed in the Automobiles & Parts sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker TRT. The last closing price for Transense Technologies was 93.50p.
Transense Tech. has a 4 week average price of 99.24p and a 12 week average price of 104.31p.
The 1 year high share price is 125p while the 1 year low share price is currently 46.25p.
There are currently 9,446,289 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 3,121 shares. The market capitalisation of Transense Tech. is £8,832,280.22.
28/11/2016
15:16
piggyinthemiddle: Don`t disagree at all patrick but the point of post 8886 was that I felt the share price was manipulated and it just wasn`t a level playing field. Yes,the small shareholder can buy if the share price falls but we don`t have the privilige of knowing how far and how long? Just saying grin and bear it doesn`t do much for me even though I think the company`s prospects are very bright. All IMHO of course and if it takes that to get instis aboard then so be it!
26/11/2016
11:44
gnnmartin: Major C., I can't really offer anything specific to back up my optimism. But there do seem to be enough green shoots to be optimistic about, and we have enough cash to give them the chance to flourish. The GE license deal, plus the fact we have one un-named user, plus the fact that a number of pilot schemes have commenced for Translogik and more are expected. In the past, attracting attention has been difficult: I don't think they have run a pilot scheme which failed to convince, but the time scales can be depressingly long. piggy, etc: small shareholders are not shafted by a sinking share price unless the company needs to raise more money. Small shareholders and institutions are 'shafted' by buying high and selling low (or holding until bankruptcy). The share price does not matter: small shareholders have a better chance than institutions of buying in at a bargain price: the difficulty is in spotting the difference between a bargain and a dog. If like me you have too many to think of buying more, then just grin and bear it. If you are not yet over-committed, and are optimistic, then lucky you: you can buy in more cheaply. No need to worry about a fund raising for a couple of years at least, and if we are still not cash flow positive by then I highly doubt I will still be optimistic.
25/11/2016
02:16
timbo003: This year’s Transense Technologies AGM was held on Wednesday 23rd November 2016 commencing at 14.00 at the company Broker’s HQ (Finncap, 60 New Broad Street, London, EC2M 1JJ). For Investors who are unfamiliar with the company. Transense Technology (TRT) is an Aim listed Technology SME with two main trading divisions: SAWsense: Sensor systems for measuring torque, temperature and pressure, wirelessly and without the need for batteries. Translogik: Innovative tyre management solutions for the OTR (Off-the-Road) and commercial vehicle markets The current market cap is approximately £9.5m with the shares priced at around 100p/share (post consolidation), they had net cash of around £3.6m (June 30th) following the sale of Intellisaw (their third business division) earlier this year to Emerson for net proceeds of £2.9m. The directors stated in the AR that they should now have enough cash to get through to break even. Links to the main web site, the annual Report and AGM resolutions are here: Web site: http://www.transense.co.uk/ Annual Report: http://tinyurl.com/z6a8jdt AGM Resolutions: http://www.transense.co.uk/downloads/aim/Final_AGM_Circular_FY16.pdf There were around 20 attendees at the AGM, including five ordinary shareholders and the board of directors. David Ford (Chairman) kicked off the meeting by first explaining that there would be no AGM presentation this year as they now intend to give twice yearly presentations to shareholders soon after the release of the interim and the final results (probably in March and September). The Chairman then read out a trading statement that had been issued earlier in the day and he stated that there was not much more he could add at this stage. We moved on to the resolutions, these were uncontroversial with the exception of resolution 6, which concerned a proposed 50 to 1 share consolidation. There were a few questions on the resolutions before voting which mainly concerned resolution 6 (see details below). All the resolutions were passed with a majority of >99% in favour with the exception of resolution 6 (the proposed 50 to 1 share consolidation) which was passed by a majority of just under 99%. The total votes cast for each resolution represented approximately 15% of the shares in issue. I commented that it was best practice to publish the details of the proxy votes following the meeting, the Chairman stated that they could do this; however, there has been nothing forthcoming (so far). We then moved on to a Q&A session, which lasted for around 30 minutes, brief details of this session and the questions on the AGM resolutions are summarised below (note: Q&As are paraphrased, they are not a verbatim account) Q: The company has seen a large decrease in share price over the last few years (70 fold decrease since 2007, but relatively stable since the last placing in June 2015) so does the share register now show a large number of shareholders with very small holdings? A: Yes Q: Given the company’s strong cash position, could it consider a tender offer to take some of the small shareholders out with no dealing costs? This sort of exercise has been conducted by other companies with a long tail of small shareholdings, for example Ingenta (previously called Publishing Technology). It would simplify the register and cut down on admin costs. A: This is something we could consider after we have received court approval for a reduction in capital which is scheduled to take place towards the end of December. Q: What is going to happen if shareholders have fractional entitlements to a share following consolidation (i.e. their pre-consolidation number is no divisible by 50)? A: Fractional entitlements will be aggregated, and then retained (or sold) for the benefit of the company (this assumes proceeds of the sale of fractional entitlements for each shareholder does not exceed £1). Q: There are no photographs of the Directors in the annual report, which one of you is responsible for sales and marketing? Many tech firms fail because their BODs are full of technical experts and accountants and there is no one concentrating on marketing. A: The CEO is the director responsible for Sales and Marketing and there are 11 people in the organisation designated to these roles (answered by Graham Storey CEO). Q: Why has it taken so long to get to where you are now (within sight of breakeven and sustained profitability)? You have been developing these products and loss making since I became a shareholder in 2005, why should we now believe it would be any difference going forward? A: We originally just focused on automobile applications of our technologies; it typically takes 20 years to get a new technology into the finished product within the auto industry. Surface acoustic wireless (SAW) transmission for sensors was just a concept when we started working on it. We are now a great deal more diversified (industrial aviation, marine, mining etc.) and these industries are generally much faster than the auto industry when adopting new technologies. Q: Mining is cyclical, in the past potential mining customers have been too busy to evaluate our systems, or in a downturn, there is not enough business to justify spending money on new systems. Itrack II has just been launched and it is claiming some success, would we have had the same interest if we had launched at a nadir in mining (15 months ago)? A: Miners are now much more aware of our Itrack system than they were a couple of years ago and they seem genuinely impressed with the savings it can produce, for example, JB Spence issued their own (independent) report which stated they were saving £1.2m in tyres as a result of employing Itrack. Operators are beginning to realise the largest cost savings are through reduction in production down time, rather than reduced tyre replacement costs. Q: Who are your main competitors for the TranslogiK division? A: for TranslogiK it is probably two tyre manufacturers (Bridgestone and Michelin) and the main non-tyre manufacturer competitor for mining applications is Rimex (who own Tyresense). http://www.tyresense.com/index.php/solutions/tyresense-industrial Q: Who are the main competitors for the SAWsense division? A: There are not any competitors at this stage. Q: What about someone like Perpetuum (held by Kings Arms Yard VCT) who use vibration harvesting to power wireless sensors for railway applications, especially bearing wear? Perpetuum have a nice SaaS recurring revenue model. https://perpetuum.com/ A: Perpettum are not on our radar screen, although will take a quick look. There are three other ways to power moving sensors: an external power source (battery), induction, or vibration. Batteries require recharging or replacement when exhausted, induction requires an adjacent power source and would not be suitable for hostile environments, and vibrational energy harvesters require continuous vibration to supply continuous power for uninterrupted transmission from a sensor. SAWsense sensors do not have these limitations and they can reliably function continuously in extreme environments. Q: What are the main threats to the business? A: No time to go into detail now, but there should be a SWOT analysis on the web site. Q: Can the sensors work in all environments, for example in environments where there could be ingress of water or oil? A: The SAWsense sensors are sealed hermetically, so there can be no fluid ingress. Q: Are Emerson pleased with the Intellisaw acquisition? Could we leverage the relationship with an “intel inside” sort of branding on their switchgear boxes? A: We are still in regular contact with Emerson; the two companies are mutually supportive. Q: Are we now cash flow positive? A: We were last year due to the sale of Intellisaw to Emerson and an upfront payment on the General Elestric deal (royalties to follow if adopted). Q: Do we charge potential customers to use our product in their field trials? A: That used to be our policy, but it is much easier to get the product trialled if we provide it free of charge. Q: When you started off, why did you just look at automobile applications, why not industrial, as it appears to be much quicker (and easier)? A: When we acquired the licence to use the SAW technology, it excluded industrial applications; the original patents expired in 2013, so that is when we started looking seriously at industrial applications. Q: How does you IP break down into patents, know how, trade secrets, software algorithms etc. A: All of the above, we have patents and 10 years of “know how” on something which is very difficult to develop. When we out-licence it is bundled altogether, but inevitably, trade secrets will become less secret despite confidentiality clauses. Q: Historically Transense have traded on a large spread, one argument put forward in favour of the share consolidation was that it should reduce the spread, some other small AIM companies have paid brokers/market makers to make a tight spread. Why don’t you consider that? A: finncap are the company brokers and they are also market makers, they generally run a flat book on Transense (answered by finncap).
24/11/2016
08:55
lord garry: I have been an investor in trt for 15 years. The worst of that period is in the last 7 years. The age profile of trt shareholders was over 55 ten years ago. Most of them are now retired and this BOD has dealt them a heavy hand. All we've had is heavy dilutions which the bod now regrets, hence the consolidation; having protected their own income and lifestyle with investors' fund, without providing any shareholders' reward. But this consolidation is not sincere. At 50:1 it's designed to cover up the failures of the past, boost the Bod's ego, possibly wipe out existing shareholders if it doesn't go to plan, and perhaps raise more funds in future, if they are so stupid. If however they are sincere and trt has finally turned the corner, after so many years and so much dilutions and destruction of value, the right time for consolidation is not now, but to wait for the share price to appreciate 10 - 15 pence and then do a consolidation of 10:1. As long as the bod have no clue about how aim works and is mainly interested in its selfish ambitions, it will set the cart before the horse. Now the deal is done and I sincerely hope it pans out well for the sake of fellow long suffering shareholders.
05/10/2016
00:22
glavey: Sojourno, 22 Sep '16 - 20:27 - 8726 You can interpret the artical in anyway you wish, with or without blinkers. ;-) But if the company is "at the right time, i.e. in the run-up, or shortly before it" enough to encourage buyers the share price will rise anyway. There is no evidence whatsoever that a consolidation is instrumental in effecting that and I do not think the writer is implying that there is. What is noted is that there is evidence of smaller long term holders being squeezed out and clear statistical evidence that in the majority of cases the share price fell in the short, medium and longer term, which lead the writer to condider that "there does seem to be a tendency towards poor performance". The three examples of given 'risers' are: two (apparently) unlisted 'growth' companies entering the market via a reverse t/o and one previously poorly performing business recovered and repaired it's balance sheet via a placing. The article concludes: "If the company is in a weak position there is a good chance that the share price will not hold up".
23/9/2016
08:57
major courtenay: Fair point DT. Maybe I'm thinking that because our products have already been used for many years, I would have expected a technological tipping point to have occurred by now. BTW, when I say single figure rises, I mean multiples of current share price. So I do think we could see three or five times current share price in two or three years, but I doubt we'll see 15 or 20 times. So maybe I am optimistic, but just not of seeing a return to the early days of stratospheric prices.
22/9/2016
16:57
greedfear: Going to vote against consolidation. Turns against investors 90% of the time. Directors love it though, it kind of covers up an abominable share price performance and it's cooler to be a director of a listed company not acting in the penny share league. It's not for "us" it's purely for "them". If they take good care of the business the share price takes care of itself.
22/9/2016
07:20
gnnmartin: Some discussion of the consolidation at the meeting, but not of the ratio. I agree that you have to trust the board, and anyhow I see this as having very little significance. The board think there are a number of institutions and wealthy individuals who will just not touch penny shares, so a share price above 50p could help pull in more investors. Consolidation is likely to reduce the spread too, which will help encourage buyers. One strong critic at the meeting said that it would be harder to get the shares to double from 100p than from 2p. To the extent that this is true, it reflects the fact that penny shares are more volatile. It is also easier to get the shares to halve at 2p than at 100p. Overall, I don't much care one way or the other. In the medium term, the company's earnings are going to dictate the share price.
21/9/2016
23:17
timbo003: I only hold EIS shares acquired in the last placing and I'm mildly positive about the consolidation. I certainly do not believe that the share price is likely to fall as a result of the consolidation, it is just as likely to rise as it is to fall. Irrespective of whether I think the share price is going to rise or fall, I am unable to sell and buy back (or buy more and then sell) during the three year holding period as the "first in first out" rule applies for EIS qualifying shares. The only exception would be if I held additional TRT shares in a wrapper such as a SIPP.
22/1/2015
01:42
spherical globe: KenOne 21 Jan'15 - 09:53 - 5602 of 5624 0 0 500,000 at 2.495 on ISDX. Asuume that is a buy. Someone is confident that all is OK. Makes me feel a little better ! That was my buy. I haven't had any contact with the board since the last placing so can't offer any "inside" info to support my buy. I'd like to see the share price lower as I'm still acquiring. But another couple of 0.5m buys will push me over the statutory disclosure limit. And that I'm trying to avoid. bitterchav 21 Jan'15 - 23:00 - 5620 of 5624 0 0 how to spot a placing That's a very good guide. But the only person I know of that's recently ramped the TRT share price in the media ahead of a placing is me. And that was over 7 years ago. The old board (pre-2008) did ramping all the time. The new board do tend to issue multiple "good news" RNS announcements immediately ahead of placings. The current lack thereof suggests no imminent placing.
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