Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tesco LSE:TSCO London Ordinary Share GB0008847096 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.90p -0.47% 189.10p 189.25p 189.40p 191.75p 188.30p 191.05p 20,495,165.00 16:35:03
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 54,433.0 162.0 1.7 111.2 15,458.60

Tesco (TSCO) Latest News (40)

More Tesco News
Tesco Takeover Rumours

Tesco (TSCO) Share Charts

1 Year Tesco Chart

1 Year Tesco Chart

1 Month Tesco Chart

1 Month Tesco Chart

Intraday Tesco Chart

Intraday Tesco Chart

Tesco (TSCO) Discussions and Chat

Tesco (TSCO) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
27/02/2017 17:07:54189.7460,515114,821.16NT
27/02/2017 17:03:58189.35515,385975,901.08NT
27/02/2017 17:02:03189.016,06411,461.78NT
27/02/2017 17:02:03189.2219,04136,029.19NT
27/02/2017 17:01:23188.9841,16777,798.45NT
View all Tesco trades in real-time

Tesco (TSCO) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
27/2/2017
08:20
Tesco Daily Update: Tesco is listed in the Food & Drug Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker TSCO. The last closing price for Tesco was 190p.
Tesco has a 4 week average price of 195.32p and a 12 week average price of 201.21p.
The 1 year high share price is 219.40p while the 1 year low share price is currently 143.45p.
There are currently 8,174,829,405 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 31,661,263 shares. The market capitalisation of Tesco is £15,458,602,404.86.
24/2/2017
11:49
sailastra: One more thing...the share price is not falling because the merger is unsound...It would be groundbreaking....The shares are falling because the merger might be blocked...
24/2/2017
11:44
sailastra: For those interested...Lewis put his feet under his desk September 2014. The share price started 2010 well above 400p The major collapse started in October 2013 when a down trend in the share price was established at 370p that down trend was finally broken in mid Feb of 2016 from which time the down trend line became a support level. The up trend began in June of 2016...That up trend has held although is being tested today... Blaming Lewis is like blaming the fireman for the fire....and arguing that he has destroyed the share price is asinine...In truth it has merely gone sideways at these levels....Tesco was badly managed and did not read the future, it is however a potentially great business but like Rome it will take more than a day to rebuild.
17/2/2017
09:14
loganair: Booker a plum prize for Tesco CEO By STAFFORD THOMAS: The fortunes of Tesco, the UK retailing stalwart, are changing, making it one to watch for investors locally and abroad. For the best part of a decade good news from Tesco (once a firm favourite of many SA fund managers) has been in short supply. Now things could be changing for the better for the £54bn annual sales UK food retail giant. Tesco has been battered by falling market share, plunging margins and an accounting scandal. But it is again attracting the attention of some astute SA fund managers and analysts in their personal capacities. Among them is Neville Chester of Coronation. “Tesco is way too cheap. It is a classic turnaround situation,” says Chester. Says independent retail analyst Syd Vianello: “It is the reason I bought a few Tescos.” Tesco is starting to live up to their expectations. It dropped a good-news bombshell on an unsuspecting market in late January, when it announced it had made a £3.9bn bid for Booker Group, the UK’s largest food wholesaler. Marking Tesco’s first move into wholesaling, the proposed deal has the full backing of Booker’s board. The deal, masterminded by Tesco CEO Dave Lewis. Booker will bring with it annual sales of £5bn and a distribution network serving 503,000 customers — including independent convenience stores, grocers, leisure outlets, pubs and restaurants. Booker reported a £155m operating profit in its year to March 2016. “It makes sense for Tesco to be consolidating its market position in its own backyard,” says Chris Gilmour of Barclays Wealth & Investment Management. He is alluding to Tesco’s disastrous foreign forays, particularly into the US and China. Tesco exited the US in 2013, taking a £1.2bn asset write-down in the process. China was effectively exited the same year when Tesco exchanged its Chinese operation (plus £558m) for a 20% stake in China Resources’ food retail business. The Booker deal is not without the risks one associates with a move into a new sector, says UK stockbroker Hargreaves Lansdown. But there are also some easy wins, with synergies in distribution and corporate costs, it adds. Tesco has put some initial figures on the easy wins. They include annual pretax synergies of at least £200m within three years of the deal’s completion. Financing of the deal, primarily through the issue of new Tesco ordinary shares, has also gone down well with the market, notes Hargreaves Lansdown. Only £770m is to be funded in cash to acquire Booker, which will bring with it £100m cash on its balance sheet and robust free cash flow (net operating cash flow less capex) of £150m/year. With Booker, Tesco is signalling to the market its determination to move forward after a turbulent period during which pretax profit plunged from £2.8bn in its year to February 2012 to a £5.8bn loss three years later. It was also a period during which Tesco was rocked by a £263m accounting scandal which has led to three former senior executives being indicted on fraud charges. Booker brings exposure to the fastest-growing segment of the UK food market and should provide Tesco with a useful growth kicker. In a market in which food prices have fallen by about 7% since September 2014, Booker bucked the trend, lifting sales 8.7% in the 24 months to September 2016. Operating profit lifted 19.5% over the period. By contrast, Tesco has been going backwards for many years. In part it was a victim of its own success, its market share soaring to a dominant 32% a decade ago. “Tesco reached a point where it could not gain more market share,” says Gilmour. Tesco’s market share and those of other big-name UK food retailers fell victim to aggressive pricing by German discounters Aldi and Lidl, which have used tough economic times to attract customers in their millions. Tesco seems to have stopped the rot, with research firm Kantar Worldpanel reporting that in the third quarter of 2016 it gained market share for the first time in five years. This took Tesco’s share to 28.2%. In its battle with Aldi and Lidl, Tesco has fared remarkably well, says Gilmour. But it has come at a big cost to its operating margin, which stood at only 1.7% in its past two financial years. Restoring margin is a key focus of Lewis’s recovery strategy for Tesco. His target is an operating margin of 3.5%-4% by 2020. In this respect, Tesco has much in common with a recovering Pick n Pay, where lifting operating margin is a key focus of its CEO, former Tesco UK CEO Richard Brasher. Results of Lewis’s strategy are already showing, with broker consensus forecasts indicating that Tesco’s EPS in the year to February will more than double and will rise by about a third in the following year. For SA investors looking to back Lewis, Tesco is an interesting play, however, Tesco’s share price is already discounting a big recovery, with even a doubling of EPS leaving it on a high 27 p/e. Some SA managers who once held Tesco are cautious. For Ricco Friedrich of Denker Capital it is a case of once bitten, twice shy. “The risk/reward trade-off does not make sense,” says Friedrich. Evan Walker of 36One Asset Management is not as dogmatic. “I would not rule out buying Tesco again but would first need to examine it very closely,” he says. For investors prepared to accept the risks that come with a turnaround play, Tesco is a share to be accumulated on price weakness. Weakness may come when Tesco faces competition authorities on the Booker deal in a process expected to stretch until late this year and even into 2018.
16/2/2017
09:45
loganair: Derek Stuart, who runs the £1 billion Artemis UK Special Situations fund, has asserted that Tesco’s acquisition of Booker can be positive for the share price. In his latest update to shareholders the top investor said that news of the deal is a ‘welcome surprise. ’Tesco announced that it is to acquire Booker, which is a cash-and-carry business, earlier this month. He continued, ‘Both companies have strong positions in their respective markets and the combined entity should enjoy significant synergies. They will, however, need to get the deal past the competition authorities. Assuming they do, we believe this combination will, by bringing together two of the best management teams in the food business, create value for shareholder.’ Competition authorities may be worried that, as Booker supplies groceries to a number of the convenience store chains in the UK that rival Tesco’s own convenience stores.
16/2/2017
09:44
loganair: Nigel Thomas: I don't like look of Tesco-Booker deal. AXA Framlington's Nigel Thomas, Booker Group's second biggest investor, doesn't understand logic of wholesaler’s £3.7 billion sale. Nigel Thomas, manager of the £3.9 billion AXA Framlington UK Select Opportunities fund, has questioned the decision of Booker Groupto sell to Tesco. Although shares in both companies have shot up since unveiling Tesco’s £3.7 billion takeover last month, Thomas, one of Booker’s biggest investors, said: ‘I don't like the look of it and I've actually been selling a few Booker shares because I don't understand it,’ he said. Announcing the deal two weeks ago, Tesco’s boss Dave Lewis hailed the acquisition as a way of injecting growth into the company’s convenience store chain and making Tesco the UK’s biggest food business. Investors in the supermarket group have largely accepted the argument while applauding its commitment to resume dividend payments. However, the deal sparked the resignation of Richard Cousins, Tesco’s senior non-executive director and chief executive of catering group Compass. Although the merger is partly predicated on using spare capacity in Tesco’s fleet of 3,000 delivery vans, analysts say the predicted £175 million of cost savings represent only 0.3% of combined sales. The Financial Times described the 12% premium Tesco is paying for Booker an expensive way for it to secure the services of its highly regarded boss Charles Wilson. Wilson, who has overseen a 675% rise in Booker’s share price in the past decade in contrast to a halving in Tesco’s stock, will join Tesco’s main board and is viewed as a potential successor to Lewis.
30/1/2017
12:44
capeview: I don't think share price is that big of an issue when you consider sainsburys has been in the same boat too. August 2014 £3.00 Today £2.55 Maybe They have the same issues as Tesco. Morrisons on the other hand, not being as big as sainsburys or Tesco, £1.60 in august 2014 now £2.40 Yes, the bigger issue is the directors paying themselves huge salaries when the share price is poor and there is no dividend, but that is an issue for the whole system not just one company. Too much you pat my back I'll pat yours, when it's the share holders and consumers that are being done over. Also, bigger companies take longer to turn around. More chaff to dump, more issues to resolve and more challenges to solve. Smaller companies have less baggage.
27/1/2017
10:25
alphahunter: As often with mergers/take-overs, there has been an overshoot in TSCO share price. Day-trading short is looking good.
22/4/2015
18:10
bobsidian: Given the relatively minor share price fall on the release of these results, it is well to see just how much had already been priced in en route to the lows of last December when the share price was in comparative freefall. Interesting to see the share price fall of today stall at the 200 day Simple Moving Average whilst already hitting technically oversold territory according to the 14 day Relative Strength Indicator. In the absence of a broader equity market sell off it would be surprising to see the share price revisit its December lows. Given the share price insanity elsewhere across equity markets as the discount mechanism incorporates multiple years worth of earnings and their cumulative perceived pace of growth, TSCO trading on a current P/E ratio of 25 is hardly demanding. And with the earnings bar now being set so relatively low, future earnings outperformance on an underlying basis could be perceived as achievable. However, should the day come when there is a broader equity market sell off on the back of generalised reduced earnings visibility then there is little doubt that the share price now has plenty of scope for a sympathetic downside move. With TSCO being the behemoth that it is, it can certainly release cash in a variety of ways to fund its rationalisation without the need to undergo a capital raising exercise. Being in such a position would doubtless make TSCO a source of envy to many other companies across different sectors. Time now for an effective business consolidator to tidy up the mess of previous business creators.
28/11/2014
08:20
mornington crescent: kazoom the chart was posted as much for its entertainment value as anything else One year charts for MRW and OCDO look very similar SBRY ia about a quarter of the size of TSCO and so is MRW so comparison is not very meaningful SBRY share price is lower than it was 20 years ago (thats as far back as my charts go, so I dont know where the floor might be TSCO share price has fallen to where it was 10 years ago but has reached an obvious chart support level
27/9/2014
21:31
minerve: 10 facts investors need to know about Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons Courtesy of HL webpage which includes all the graphs etc.. http://www.hl.co.uk/news/articles/10-facts-investors-need-to-know-about-tesco-sainsburys-and-morrisons Charlie Huggins | 26 September 2014 | A A A 10 facts investors need to know about Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons Sentiment towards the supermarket sector is at rock bottom following this week's shock announcement from Tesco - but are there bargains to be had? Here's what investors need to know. 1. The shares have performed very poorly As the chart below highlights, Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons shares have been subject to a brutal sell-off over the last year. Tesco's shares are the lowest they've been for more than a decade; while Sainsbury's is around the same price it was in the depths of the 2008 financial crisis. Morrisons share price is broadly similar to where it was in 2004, following its fraught £3bn acquisition of Safeway. 10 year share price performance No recommendation No news or research item is a personal recommendation to deal. All investments can fall as well as rise in value so you could get back less than you invest. Sainsburys Morrisons Tesco 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 £2 £4 £6 £0 Source: Lipper IM, to 24 September 2014 Past performance is not a guide to future returns. View Tesco share prices, charts and research View Sainsbury's share prices, charts and research View Morrisons share prices, charts and research 2. They're cheap On the surface at least, the poor share price performance of the UK supermarkets means valuations look cheap. Tesco currently trades on a price to earnings ratio (P/E) of 8.2, while Sainsbury's is on a P/E of 6.9. It should be remembered, however, that these are based on historic earnings figures and earnings for the coming year are likely to be substantially lower (Morrisons doesn't have a P/E because it made a loss last year). Another way of valuing a company is to look at the price to book ratio (P/B). This is calculated as the current share price divided by the net asset value per share. A ratio below 1 indicates the theoretical 'break-up' value of a business in the event of bankruptcy is greater than the current market valuation. The table below shows that Sainsbury's and Morrisons currently trade on a P/B of below 1, a strong indication of value. Tesco has a P/B of close to 1 so also looks attractively valued on this measure. As the table also illustrates, the current P/B for each company is significantly below its ten-year historical average. Company Current P/B 10-year historic P/B Discount to historical average Tesco 1.07 2.35 54% Sainsbury's 0.81 1.32 39% Morrisons 0.88 1.47 40% Source: Bloomberg, to 25 September 2014 Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 3. They're unloved Some analysts have described the UK supermarket sector as 'uninvestable', while the majority of fund managers continue to avoid it like the plague. Tesco is the most unloved of the three, with market consensus rooted at a sell. Even long-standing Tesco shareholders are starting to lose patience with the company, after it admitted to 'overstating' its profit forecasts by an estimated £250 million last Monday. BlackRock, one of Tesco's biggest shareholders, announced on Wednesday that it has sold £150m worth of shares, reducing its stake by around a fifth. 'Short interest' in the UK supermarket sector has also soared over the last year. 'Short sellers' seek to profit from shares that are falling in value, hoping to buy them back later at a lower price. Rising short interest therefore usually indicates a growing sense of doom and gloom regarding a company's prospects. Company Current net short interest Net short interest a year ago Year-on-year increase Tesco 1.14% 0.68% 68% Sainsbury's 9.41% 2.96 218% Morrisons 5.21% 2.68% 94% Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 4. They're losing market share One of the main reasons the UK supermarkets are cheap and unloved is because their sales are falling and they are losing market share, as the table below illustrates. Aldi and Lidl, on the other hand, continue to make significant inroads into the UK grocery market, while the likes of Waitrose are also enjoying decent growth. The UK supermarket sector has become polarised with Tesco, Morrisons and, to a lesser extent, Sainsbury's, trapped in the middle of the deep discounters and the upper-end grocery retailers. Company Change in sales Tesco -4.5% Sainsbury's -1.8% Morrisons -1.3% Aldi +29.1% Lidl +17.7% Waitrose +4.5% Source: Kantar Worldpanel, covering the 12 weeks ending 12 September Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 58p in every £1 spent in British shops is spent in UK supermarkets Source: The Grocer 5. They're suffering from a weak UK grocery market Another big problem facing Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons is that overall growth in the UK grocery market has slowed dramatically - to a new record low of 0.3% (according to the latest figures from Kantar). Therefore, not only is the slice of the pie shrinking for these three companies, but the size of the pie itself is not growing at anywhere near the rate that it has done in the past. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 6. They're changing their strategy The days of Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons rolling out large out-of-town supermarkets across the country have gone. Indeed, Tesco recently delayed the opening of a new £22m 47,000 sq ft store in Cambridgeshire. This is the second 'delayed opening' announced by the troubled supermarket giant this month. Customers who used to shop at large out-of-town stores are now doing more of their shopping online and in local convenience outlets. As a result, this is where the supermarkets are increasingly focusing their efforts. We're also seeing a renewed emphasis on cutting prices. Morrisons has been the first of the big three to cut prices aggressively with the launch of its 'I'm cheaper' campaign, but Tesco could follow suit when new CEO Dave Lewis announces his new strategy in the coming months. Sainsbury's, with its upmarket offering, may need to try different tactics, but is unlikely to be immune from the price war. We should get more details of their strategy when they report half-year results on Wednesday 1 October. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 7. They're cutting back on spending One way the supermarkets have responded to the extremely challenging market conditions is by taking a knife to costs. Tesco expects capital expenditure this year to be no more than £2.1 billion, a reduction of £600 million from the previous year. Morrisons slashed its capital expenditure by more than half in the first half of its financial year, as it cut back on new store expansion. This should, in theory, be good news for shareholders and their customers, allowing them to 'reinvest' these savings into lowering prices. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 8. They're no longer a reliable source of income Three of the top five highest yielding companies in the FTSE 100 are supermarkets and, on the surface, yields in the region of 7% look very appealing. The supermarket sector has, after all, traditionally provided a reliable source of income. However, Tesco has already announced a 75% cut to its interim dividend. While Sainsbury's and Morrisons have yet to follow suit (the latter actually increased its latest dividend by 5%), these yields could ultimately prove unsustainable. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 9. They have large property portfolios Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons all have substantial property portfolios, with a combined balance sheet value of over £40 bn. This compares with their combined market capitalisation of around £25 billion. All three companies have sought to release value from their property estates via property disposals and sale-and-leaseback agreements. Some activist investors are calling for them to go further by breaking up their property empires and spinning them off into separate listed firms. This could allow the value of the property to rise to more realistic levels. The supermarkets have, thus far, resisted the idea, but investors should watch this space closely. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 10. They're not going to give up without a fight Morrisons recently announced a three year plan to get growth back on track. Sainsbury's now has a new boss, Mike Coupe, who took over from long-standing CEO Justin King in July. He will be keen to put his stamp on the company and arrest the worrying recent decline in sales. Most of all, it will be interesting to see what Dave Lewis, Tesco's new CEO, has in store. He achieved great things in his previous roles at Unilever and comes with very high acclaim. However, he has no direct retail experience and appears to have inherited a business in complete disarray. Tesco also has a new chief financial officer, Alan Stewart, who has been parachuted into the role more than two months earlier than originally planned. With UK supermarkets still accounting for nearly 60p in every £1 spent in British shops, it's safe to assume that whatever happens, Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons are not going to go down without a fight. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox The dynamics of the UK supermarket sector are changing rapidly and, for investors, this means it is more important than ever to keep up-to-date with any developments. Sainsbury's is the next company to report results on Wednesday 1 October. This will be followed by Tesco's first set of results under Dave Lewis, on 23 October, and Morrisons will report its third quarter results the following month. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox
Tesco share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
Your Recent History
LSE
GKP
Gulf Keyst..
LSE
QPP
Quindell
FTSE
UKX
FTSE 100
LSE
IOF
Iofina
FX
GBPUSD
UK Sterlin..
Stocks you've viewed will appear in this box, letting you easily return to quotes you've seen previously.

Register now to create your own custom streaming stock watchlist.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P:35 V: D:20170228 03:26:29