Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tesco LSE:TSCO London Ordinary Share GB0008847096 ORD 5P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +1.20p +0.58% 206.75p 206.70p 206.80p 207.10p 203.80p 204.20p 14,326,503.00 16:35:09
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Food & Drug Retailers 54,433.0 162.0 1.7 121.6 16,900.12

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DateSubject
04/12/2016
08:20
Tesco Daily Update: Tesco is listed in the Food & Drug Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker TSCO. The last closing price for Tesco was 205.55p.
Tesco has a 4 week average price of 208.30p and a 12 week average price of 198.15p.
The 1 year high share price is 219p while the 1 year low share price is currently 137p.
There are currently 8,174,180,220 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 20,837,633 shares. The market capitalisation of Tesco is £16,900,117,604.85.
18/10/2016
09:48
khu1: Tesco backs on track now. According to investors predicting the Tesco share price will be up to £2.50 before Christmas. Everyone better jump in the ship now before it too late.
13/10/2016
07:53
icejelly: Which company TSCO or ULVR has taken the bigger hit on its share price today?
02/10/2016
17:41
alibx11: Typical of the FT.. Mail on Sunday reports on it's estimated pensions deficit and... "The company is expected to announce on Wednesday that sales have risen for the past three quarters after Tesco’s chief executive Dave Lewis started to turn the business around. Analysts say the interim profit could increase by 40 per cent to £487million. Its lower-price Farm brands range is said to be delivering rising volumes as sales speed up. Bruno Monteyne, an analyst at Bernstein, said: ‘Tesco’s large pension deficit will get worse when it announces its latest results. However, we expect that is already well reflected in the current share price. ‘It remains one of the strongest food retailers with solid sales growth, access to the fastest growing convenience and online channels and a well-executed own label strategy.’
30/5/2016
10:44
loganair: Because it has become so boring to chat about Tesco, being a company in my view that is not really going any where for quite some considerable time. The questions I ask my self are - Will Tesco´s: 1). Regain the 5.7% market share they have lost over the past 5 years. 2). Increase their margins to the 5% to 7% it once used to be. 3). Make the profit it used to make. It seems to me on all three questions the answer is very,very highly unlikely, therefore in my view the Tesco share price will not get up to where it was a few years ago and hence why I say Tesco has not become a share for Speculators who trade rather then the medium to long term investor. It is also highly likely that over the next few years Tesco will keep losing market share.
14/5/2016
10:58
loganair: By Alan Oscroft - It seems like people have been calling the bottom for Tesco for a couple of years now, declaring that the worst is over and that things are on the up again. There was a bit of a surge at the start of 2015, after a Christmas trading update seemed better than expected, but that soon tailed off and Tesco shares lost ground that year. Something similar happened at the start of this year. But after full-year results were released in April, the share price turned south again -- to 156p. Tesco shares are still up 12% since the start of 2016, but it's looking like it could be 2015 all over again. Looking back at the past year, forecasts for Tesco have been steadily scaled back too, as time after time the signs that it's returning to its old winning ways keep fading away. The latest disappointment has come from JPMorgan Cazenove, which has warned that a number of one-offs are flattering Tesco's financial appearance, and in the past week we've seen earnings forecasts scaled back again. Price wars: That leads me to the one thing that you really need to know before you consider buying Tesco -- it hasn't beaten the low-price competition threat from Lidl and Aldi, not by a long way. No amount of store revamps and "customer experience" improvement is going to change that. Tesco should see costs rising this year, after a year of unsustainably low capital expenditure and with a return to a more normal tax regime due. And to add to those woes, the latest Kantar Worldpanel report revealed a sales fall of 1.3% in the three months to 24 April 24, while Aldi and Lidl continue with their relentless growth. After several years of rapidly declining earnings per share, analysts are forecasting a rise of around 150% by the time the current year ends in February 2017. But to put that into context, EPS would still be less than a fifth of the levels it stood at in 2012. And even at such modest earnings, Tesco shares would still be on a forward P/E of over 23, which seems way too high to me, especially with its current uncertainty and risk. The harsh reality is that we're going to continue to see further price deflation, after Kantar also told us that groceries prices have now fallen every month since September 2014 -- and all indications suggest even the big four are ready for further price wars, with Asda set to try to regain its lost volume via aggressive price-slashing. That strongly suggests we'll be seeing further forecast downgrades for Tesco over the course of the next 12 months too, and I place little confidence in current predictions. No going back: Many observers seem to have seen Tesco as just having had a rough patch, like almost all companies at some time in their lives, and have assumed it will put things right and recover to its good old ways. The problem is that thinking can miss the fact that there's been a permanent change. It needed an assault from Lidl and Aldi to break the complacency of our big four, and we won't be going back to the high-margin retailing that Tesco used to enjoy. Tesco will surely get back to earnings growth, but I can see it as being at a significantly lower level than before -- and at a significantly lower share price too.
04/3/2016
12:12
capeview: Ive had a look in ALDI a few times. There produce looks good and fairly well priced, but considering I cant get everything I need there and sometimes lok for better quality meats and fish, I tend to shop elsewhere. Recently been using TESCO a few times for shopping, and find there produce pretty good and well priced, and I like the fact they actually take of the price of branded goods if found cheaper elsewhere straight from your shop, as opposed to sainsburys that give you a voucher that more often than not gets forgotten about. Plus, like Waitrose, they have those handy scanners which are a great idea. Have yet to see those in any Sainsburys I use. Plus the cost of things in Sainsburys have gone up. Tesco are reasonable on prices, quality foods and products along with Bonus points that you don't get in ASDA. However, I did sell my TESCO shares at a loss and bought Barclays as there was a huge drop in price which is immensely useful and made me far more money. Just a shame I lack funds otherwise I'd have both. I don't see TESCO going anywhere lately, but share price is definitely looking a lot better.
19/6/2015
11:43
andrewbaker: Tesco's share price is at the level that it was in 1999/2000, yet it is a much bigger business now. It made errors a few years ago, and has had management problems and changes, causing the big drop in the share price; but it is recovering. It is getting rid of non-core assets and businesses, which will bring cash in as well as remove poorly performing areas of the business, and it is improving the areas that matter. So often rises in share price are too much too soon, and likewise falls in share price are much overdone too: that is the reality here. Wise investors, meaning those who actually investigate any company in which they are thinking of buying shares, will appreciate that any short term fall in price at current levels is an opportunity to buy cheap stock, and they will do that. Hence, my prediction that over the summer the price will slowly but surely get to top 250p., and when future news and trading announcements are made regarding the business, that will then send it back north towards 300p. and higher. (A fair price now, taking future likely trading into account, would be around 350p. IMHO.)
22/4/2015
18:10
bobsidian: Given the relatively minor share price fall on the release of these results, it is well to see just how much had already been priced in en route to the lows of last December when the share price was in comparative freefall. Interesting to see the share price fall of today stall at the 200 day Simple Moving Average whilst already hitting technically oversold territory according to the 14 day Relative Strength Indicator. In the absence of a broader equity market sell off it would be surprising to see the share price revisit its December lows. Given the share price insanity elsewhere across equity markets as the discount mechanism incorporates multiple years worth of earnings and their cumulative perceived pace of growth, TSCO trading on a current P/E ratio of 25 is hardly demanding. And with the earnings bar now being set so relatively low, future earnings outperformance on an underlying basis could be perceived as achievable. However, should the day come when there is a broader equity market sell off on the back of generalised reduced earnings visibility then there is little doubt that the share price now has plenty of scope for a sympathetic downside move. With TSCO being the behemoth that it is, it can certainly release cash in a variety of ways to fund its rationalisation without the need to undergo a capital raising exercise. Being in such a position would doubtless make TSCO a source of envy to many other companies across different sectors. Time now for an effective business consolidator to tidy up the mess of previous business creators.
28/11/2014
08:20
mornington crescent: kazoom the chart was posted as much for its entertainment value as anything else One year charts for MRW and OCDO look very similar SBRY ia about a quarter of the size of TSCO and so is MRW so comparison is not very meaningful SBRY share price is lower than it was 20 years ago (thats as far back as my charts go, so I dont know where the floor might be TSCO share price has fallen to where it was 10 years ago but has reached an obvious chart support level
27/9/2014
21:31
minerve: 10 facts investors need to know about Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons Courtesy of HL webpage which includes all the graphs etc.. http://www.hl.co.uk/news/articles/10-facts-investors-need-to-know-about-tesco-sainsburys-and-morrisons Charlie Huggins | 26 September 2014 | A A A 10 facts investors need to know about Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons Sentiment towards the supermarket sector is at rock bottom following this week's shock announcement from Tesco - but are there bargains to be had? Here's what investors need to know. 1. The shares have performed very poorly As the chart below highlights, Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons shares have been subject to a brutal sell-off over the last year. Tesco's shares are the lowest they've been for more than a decade; while Sainsbury's is around the same price it was in the depths of the 2008 financial crisis. Morrisons share price is broadly similar to where it was in 2004, following its fraught £3bn acquisition of Safeway. 10 year share price performance No recommendation No news or research item is a personal recommendation to deal. All investments can fall as well as rise in value so you could get back less than you invest. Sainsburys Morrisons Tesco 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 £2 £4 £6 £0 Source: Lipper IM, to 24 September 2014 Past performance is not a guide to future returns. View Tesco share prices, charts and research View Sainsbury's share prices, charts and research View Morrisons share prices, charts and research 2. They're cheap On the surface at least, the poor share price performance of the UK supermarkets means valuations look cheap. Tesco currently trades on a price to earnings ratio (P/E) of 8.2, while Sainsbury's is on a P/E of 6.9. It should be remembered, however, that these are based on historic earnings figures and earnings for the coming year are likely to be substantially lower (Morrisons doesn't have a P/E because it made a loss last year). Another way of valuing a company is to look at the price to book ratio (P/B). This is calculated as the current share price divided by the net asset value per share. A ratio below 1 indicates the theoretical 'break-up' value of a business in the event of bankruptcy is greater than the current market valuation. The table below shows that Sainsbury's and Morrisons currently trade on a P/B of below 1, a strong indication of value. Tesco has a P/B of close to 1 so also looks attractively valued on this measure. As the table also illustrates, the current P/B for each company is significantly below its ten-year historical average. Company Current P/B 10-year historic P/B Discount to historical average Tesco 1.07 2.35 54% Sainsbury's 0.81 1.32 39% Morrisons 0.88 1.47 40% Source: Bloomberg, to 25 September 2014 Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 3. They're unloved Some analysts have described the UK supermarket sector as 'uninvestable', while the majority of fund managers continue to avoid it like the plague. Tesco is the most unloved of the three, with market consensus rooted at a sell. Even long-standing Tesco shareholders are starting to lose patience with the company, after it admitted to 'overstating' its profit forecasts by an estimated £250 million last Monday. BlackRock, one of Tesco's biggest shareholders, announced on Wednesday that it has sold £150m worth of shares, reducing its stake by around a fifth. 'Short interest' in the UK supermarket sector has also soared over the last year. 'Short sellers' seek to profit from shares that are falling in value, hoping to buy them back later at a lower price. Rising short interest therefore usually indicates a growing sense of doom and gloom regarding a company's prospects. Company Current net short interest Net short interest a year ago Year-on-year increase Tesco 1.14% 0.68% 68% Sainsbury's 9.41% 2.96 218% Morrisons 5.21% 2.68% 94% Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 4. They're losing market share One of the main reasons the UK supermarkets are cheap and unloved is because their sales are falling and they are losing market share, as the table below illustrates. Aldi and Lidl, on the other hand, continue to make significant inroads into the UK grocery market, while the likes of Waitrose are also enjoying decent growth. The UK supermarket sector has become polarised with Tesco, Morrisons and, to a lesser extent, Sainsbury's, trapped in the middle of the deep discounters and the upper-end grocery retailers. Company Change in sales Tesco -4.5% Sainsbury's -1.8% Morrisons -1.3% Aldi +29.1% Lidl +17.7% Waitrose +4.5% Source: Kantar Worldpanel, covering the 12 weeks ending 12 September Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 58p in every £1 spent in British shops is spent in UK supermarkets Source: The Grocer 5. They're suffering from a weak UK grocery market Another big problem facing Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons is that overall growth in the UK grocery market has slowed dramatically - to a new record low of 0.3% (according to the latest figures from Kantar). Therefore, not only is the slice of the pie shrinking for these three companies, but the size of the pie itself is not growing at anywhere near the rate that it has done in the past. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 6. They're changing their strategy The days of Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons rolling out large out-of-town supermarkets across the country have gone. Indeed, Tesco recently delayed the opening of a new £22m 47,000 sq ft store in Cambridgeshire. This is the second 'delayed opening' announced by the troubled supermarket giant this month. Customers who used to shop at large out-of-town stores are now doing more of their shopping online and in local convenience outlets. As a result, this is where the supermarkets are increasingly focusing their efforts. We're also seeing a renewed emphasis on cutting prices. Morrisons has been the first of the big three to cut prices aggressively with the launch of its 'I'm cheaper' campaign, but Tesco could follow suit when new CEO Dave Lewis announces his new strategy in the coming months. Sainsbury's, with its upmarket offering, may need to try different tactics, but is unlikely to be immune from the price war. We should get more details of their strategy when they report half-year results on Wednesday 1 October. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 7. They're cutting back on spending One way the supermarkets have responded to the extremely challenging market conditions is by taking a knife to costs. Tesco expects capital expenditure this year to be no more than £2.1 billion, a reduction of £600 million from the previous year. Morrisons slashed its capital expenditure by more than half in the first half of its financial year, as it cut back on new store expansion. This should, in theory, be good news for shareholders and their customers, allowing them to 'reinvest' these savings into lowering prices. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 8. They're no longer a reliable source of income Three of the top five highest yielding companies in the FTSE 100 are supermarkets and, on the surface, yields in the region of 7% look very appealing. The supermarket sector has, after all, traditionally provided a reliable source of income. However, Tesco has already announced a 75% cut to its interim dividend. While Sainsbury's and Morrisons have yet to follow suit (the latter actually increased its latest dividend by 5%), these yields could ultimately prove unsustainable. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 9. They have large property portfolios Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons all have substantial property portfolios, with a combined balance sheet value of over £40 bn. This compares with their combined market capitalisation of around £25 billion. All three companies have sought to release value from their property estates via property disposals and sale-and-leaseback agreements. Some activist investors are calling for them to go further by breaking up their property empires and spinning them off into separate listed firms. This could allow the value of the property to rise to more realistic levels. The supermarkets have, thus far, resisted the idea, but investors should watch this space closely. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox 10. They're not going to give up without a fight Morrisons recently announced a three year plan to get growth back on track. Sainsbury's now has a new boss, Mike Coupe, who took over from long-standing CEO Justin King in July. He will be keen to put his stamp on the company and arrest the worrying recent decline in sales. Most of all, it will be interesting to see what Dave Lewis, Tesco's new CEO, has in store. He achieved great things in his previous roles at Unilever and comes with very high acclaim. However, he has no direct retail experience and appears to have inherited a business in complete disarray. Tesco also has a new chief financial officer, Alan Stewart, who has been parachuted into the role more than two months earlier than originally planned. With UK supermarkets still accounting for nearly 60p in every £1 spent in British shops, it's safe to assume that whatever happens, Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons are not going to go down without a fight. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox The dynamics of the UK supermarket sector are changing rapidly and, for investors, this means it is more important than ever to keep up-to-date with any developments. Sainsbury's is the next company to report results on Wednesday 1 October. This will be followed by Tesco's first set of results under Dave Lewis, on 23 October, and Morrisons will report its third quarter results the following month. Register for free share research updates on Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons direct to your inbox
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