Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell B LSE:RDSB London Ordinary Share GB00B03MM408 'B' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 2,177.00p 2,180.00p 2,181.00p - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 189,165.5 4,539.8 47.0 46.7 81,539.25

Shell B Share Discussion Threads

Showing 9776 to 9797 of 9800 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
22/2/2017
13:39
FJ,Great post.Yes Motley Fool,take them with a pinch of salt.
garycook
22/2/2017
12:34
Yawn. Royston yet again. Signals next step up to £25. Re: : Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. That may well be true, but he certainly seems to have a determination to post relentless negative articles on Shell every few days, all year long. Have a look at: http://www.fool.co.uk/company/page/1/?ticker=LSE-RDSB Here are a few typical Royston Wild headlines from 2016, but there are many, many more to choose from the link posted above - enjoy. I've included the Closing Price of Shell to give you an idea of how helpful his advice has been so far this year if the casual investor had taken it. RDSB Shareprice today: £21.80 60% higher than when he posted his classic "I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain" when the RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51. That is why I personally choose to never take his opinion on Shell as anything other than comical. Best regards, FJ ------------------------- Why Now May Be The Time To Sell Anglo American plc, Tesco PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc By Royston Wild - Thursday, 14 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £18.13 Why I Wouldn’t Touch Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Tullow Oil plc With A Bargepole! By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.40 Can 1st Quarter Winners Royal Dutch Shell Plc (+10%), Unilever plc (+8%) & KAZ Minerals PLC (+67%) Keep Climbing? By Royston Wild - Friday, 1 April, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.83 Is It Finally Time To Give Up On Royal Dutch Shell Plc? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 24 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.88 Is Royal Dutch Shell Plc In Danger Of A Colossal Correction? By Royston Wild - Thursday, 17 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £17.38 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc’s Dividend Outlook Should Scare You By Royston Wild - Thursday, 10 March, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.41 Are Lloyds Banking Group PLC & Royal Dutch Shell Plc REALLY Great Value? By Royston Wild - Monday, 29 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £16.45 When Will Shares In Royal Dutch Shell Plc Finally Reach Bottom? By Royston Wild - Wednesday, 17 February, 2016 His comment: I believe much further trouble is in store for Shell looking ahead and expect shares to keep on falling. RDSB Shareprice was at £16.36 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & Vodafone Group plc: Value Titans Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Tuesday, 9 February, 2016 RDSB Shareprice was at £14.61 Why Royal Dutch Shell Plc Shares Could Easily Topple Another 15%! By Royston Wild - Friday, 29 January, 2016 His comment: A subsequent re-rating of Shell’s share price would leave the oil leviathan dealing at £12.80 per share, representing a vast 15% reduction from current levels. But even this projection be considered optimistic, in my opinion. RDSB Shareprice was at £15.21 Why Buying BP plc & Royal Dutch Shell Plc Is Utter Madness! By Royston Wild - Friday, 15 January, 2016 His comment: I believe investors should resist attempting to pick up a bargain. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.51 Royal Dutch Shell Plc & GlaxoSmithKline plc: Brilliant Bargains Or Value Traps? By Royston Wild - Friday, 8 January, 2016 His comment: I believe Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) can be considered a bona-fide value trap at the present time. RDSB Shareprice was at £13.75
fjgooner
22/2/2017
07:27
Why I think Royal Dutch Shell plc should be dealing 33% lower A Shell fuel nozzle Photo: Royal Dutch Shell. Fair use. Royston Wild | Wednesday, 22nd February, 2017 | More on: RDSB 0 inShare Signs that the oil market’s enduring material surplus may take longer to erode than hoped-for following OPEC’s landmark output freeze in November have seen Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) retreat from January’s highs around £23.80 per share. Indeed, the energy giant is now dealing 8% lower to those three-year peaks. But I believe the company’s share price should still be dealing much, much lower. The City expects earnings at Shell to explode 93% in 2017, resulting in a P/E ratio of 15.2 times. But I reckon expectations of such an electrifying rise remain on very shaky ground, given that a healthy uptick in barrel values is needed to make these forecasts a reality. I believe a forward P/E ratio of 10 times, anchored on the watermark reflective of stocks with high risk profiles, is a fairer reflection of Shell’s bottom-line prospects. And a subsequent share price re-rating would leave the crude colossus dealing at £14.37 per share, representing a stunning 33% discount to current levels Supply Swells Investor sentiment has been influenced by a relentless rise in the US rig count since late last year, with recent Baker Hughes numbers showing the number of units hitting fresh 16-month peaks last week, at 597. But exploding output in the States is not the only barrier to Shell’s earnings recovery as production levels leap elsewhere. In Brazil, for instance, state-owned producer Petrobras pulled a record 2.3m barrels of the black stuff out of the ground on average in December, taking out the previous record of three months earlier. Although production stepped back last month due to scheduled maintenance, average pre-salt production hit an all-time peak of 1.34m barrels per day. Investment in Canada’s fossil fuel industry is also driving output here to the stars. Indeed, latest export numbers from the National Energy Board showed crude exports averaged 538,089 cubic metres per day in November, surging from 485,863 metres in the prior month. Data from Baker Hughes last week also showed that 194 oil rigs were churning material out of the ground last week, almost double the number of units seen a year ago and suggesting that production levels should keep on climbing. Risky Business Oil prices received a fillip on Tuesday after OPEC Secretary General Mohammed Barkindo said the group is aiming to keep the compliance rate on an upward bent. The cartel saw conformity with autumn’s agreed production quota hit an impressive 90% last month. But whether or not the group can keep the rate rising in the months ahead, the viability of November’s deal lasting beyond the summer deadline will be hotly contested by many members seeking to ramp up their own production. A failure to extend the accord could prove catastrophic for oil prices as rising production elsewhere already threatens to keep global crude inventories at bursting point. US stockpiles struck a fresh record of 518m barrels last week, and are broadly expected to hit new highs when the EIA reports again this week. Clearly claims of a balanced oil market remain very much in the air, and with it a meaty earnings bounce at the likes of Shell. Given the murky supply and demand indicators still washing over the energy sector, I believe investment in the oil major is still extremely risky at present, and particularly at current share prices. This single stock could make you rich But whether or not you like the look of Shell, I recommend you take a look at this report revealing the identity of another London-quoted growth giant. The Motley Fool's A Top Growth Share report looks at a brilliant FTSE 250 stock that has already delivered stunning shareholder returns, and whose sales are expected to top the magic £1bn marker in the near future. Click here to enjoy this exclusive wealth report. It's 100% free and can be sent immediately to your inbox. Royston Wild has no position in any shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Royal Dutch Shell B. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
waldron
21/2/2017
07:47
Business News Home > Business > Business News Tuesday, 21 February 2017 Shell shakes up oil trading world by laura hurstandjavier blas image: Http://www.thestar.com.my/~/media/online/2014/03/14/04/06/shell.ashx/?w=620&h=413&crop=1&;hash=FF609B50CC202FFD2F4F3B914DF2F87ED7492F3A More buying: While none of those interviewed said Shell did anything illegal, they said the company violated the unspoken rules governing the market, which is lightly regulated. More buying: While none of those interviewed said Shell did anything illegal, they said the company violated the unspoken rules governing the market, which is lightly regulated. Read more at Http://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2017/02/21/shell-shakes-up-oil-trading-world/#eJ1xARr2Ia0QAiWl.99
waldron
20/2/2017
22:06
sitted at 2175 now its down towards 2075 for the next 8 weeks or so some might say a nice buying opportunity that comes once a quarter
waldron
20/2/2017
19:00
Doubt it's heading to £20 but wtfdik.Support 2145-2148.Will see.DD
discodave4
20/2/2017
16:44
Shell seems to be sitting on major trend line support. Interestingly bp has already gone south of trend line support. Is shell really heading back down to the clear double bottom 2000 area? Stochastic looks oversold daily. Rsi also heading to 30. Below 50 and 100 ma. Obviously trading xd so weak. Oil once again testing upper area of clearly defined range.
supermarky
16/2/2017
16:57
'Flurry' of billion dollar deals signals start of 'third wave' of North Sea activity, says expert Chrysaor's recent $3.8 billion acquisition of North Sea oil and gas assets from Shell will be the "catalyst" for a new wave of mergers and acquisitions in the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), according to an expert at Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com.15 Feb 2017 Energy and infrastructure finance Corporate Projects Equity capital markets M&A Oil and gas Energy UK Europe Energy deals expert Rosalie Chadwick described the deal as the likely "tipping point" leading to a "third wave of the North Sea's evolution and a number of other significant transactions in the months and years ahead". "More availability of funding, a stable oil price, better alignment of price expectations for both buyers and sellers, and a fresh approach to decommissioning responsibilities means that all the chess pieces are lined up with the North Sea poised for a period of productive M&A activity," she said. "The identity of a lot of owners will change quite considerably, but it is no bad thing to see well-capitalised new blood enter the sector and embracing new technologies, which make smaller recoveries in the more mature fields economically viable," she said. Over $6bn has been invested in North Sea assets in the last six months as a result of renewed interest in exploration and production activity, including the $1.24bn acquisition last week of Ithaca Energy by Israel-based Delek Group. Pinsent Masons provided legal advice to Ithaca on the deal, which Chadwick said "caps off a busy start to the year which has seen a renewed level of interest in North Sea assets as prices have stabilised and expectations adjusted". The private equity markets had provided an increasing source of finance for deals over the past six to 12 months, not just in funding management terms but also in capital deployment, Chadwick said. Innovative deal structures including the likes of Blackstone and Bluewater Energy's investment of over $500 million into Siccar Point Energy, Suncor Energy's acquisition of a 30% stake in the Rosebank project and EnQuest's £85m purchase of a stake in BP's Magnus field also pointed to the recovery of North Sea investment, she said. "This has been transformational after a four-year funding hiatus which left the North Sea perched on the edge of a chasm," she said. Chadwick said that the surge in activity could be attributed to businesses both successfully adjusting to the 'new normal' oil price of $50 per barrel following the steep decline in commodity prices, and taking a "more realistic" view of assets due for decommissioning. Shell, for example, has agreed to cover around $1bn worth of Chrysaor's future decommissioning costs as part of their deal; while Chrysaor noted the reduction in North Sea operating costs to "competitive economic levels" as part of its announcement to the industry. "This funding boom is a combination of businesses successfully adjusting to the new $50 oil norm and resetting their cost base which has resulted in a surge of confidence in investment in North Sea assets," Chadwick said. "We're also experiencing a transformation in terms of the treatment of decommissioning as assets change hands. Majors are taking a more realistic view, with recognition that some liabilities will need to be retained and the net result of this shift in attitude is that more deals will get over the line," she said. The average cost of extracting a barrel of oil or gas fell by 45% during 2015, according to the latest figures from industry body Oil and Gas UK.
sarkasm
13/2/2017
09:42
Why I believe Royal Dutch Shell plc’s dividend looks safe despite falling profits Shell petrol station Photo: Coolcaesar Licence: hxxp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en Rupert Hargreaves | Monday, 13th February, 2017 | More on: RDSB 0 inShare For much of the past three years, investors have continually questioned the sustainability of the Royal Dutch Shell (LSE: RDSB) dividend payout as the price of oil has languished. Indeed, as the price of oil has fallen to its lowest level in over a decade, Shell has been paying out more than it can realistically afford to investors, filling the gap between income and spending with debt. For example, during 2015 the company paid a total dividend of $9.4bn to investors even though free cash flow after capital expenditure was only $4bn. Last year, including capital spending and the dividend, the company spent $10bn more than cash generated from operations. In both of these cases, borrowing filled the gap between spending and income. As a result, and including the acquisition of BG Group, Shell’s debt has ballooned to a staggering $92.5bn, a gearing ratio of 50%. Five years ago, its gearing was 22%. But despite the cash crunch and rising level of debt, I believe the group’s dividend payout is here to stay. The worst is over It looks as if the worst is now over for the oil market. After the price of Brent crude collapsed to a low of $35/bbl at the beginning of 2016, the price of black gold has now rallied back above $55/bbl, and Shell’s income has also steadily improved. During the first quarter of 2016, the group generated $661m in cash from operations, hardly enough to cover 10% of capital spending commitments for the period. However, during the last two quarters of 2016, cash generated from operations came in at just under $18bn. This total was more than enough to cover capital spending commitments, the dividend and to reduce debt from a high of $98bn at the end of the third quarter to that $92.5bn by the end of the year. Asset sales also helped bulk up cash flows. Shell’s dividend payout costs the company around $2.5bn per quarter, which is usually easily covered by cash generated from operations. As the price of oil has languished, cash generation has failed to meet spending commitments, but Shell’s management has reacted quickly to improve dividend longevity. Crunching numbers Shell’s capital spending obligations have fallen by half since 2013. This year the group is planning to spend $25bn, down from around $29bn for 2016. During 2015 the average Brent crude price was $52.4/bbl on which Shell managed to generate $30bn. This year the price of Brent has averaged $55bbl so looks as if Shell will be able to generate $30bn or more in cash from operations. Cash generation should easily meet capital spending commitments and when combined with the group’s targeted $30bn of asset disposals it looks highly likely that Shell will be able to both cover its dividend and pay down additional debt during 2017. So overall, it looks as if Shell’s 6.6% dividend yield isn’t going away any time soon. Looking for dividends? If it's dividends you're after, I strongly recommend you check out this special report, which gives a rundown of what I believe is one of the hottest dividend stocks in London today. The exclusive report entitled A Top Income Share looks at a hidden FTSE giant that's already an income champion but is also investing for growth and these ambitious expansion plans should power dividends through the roof in the years ahead. To discover more just click here and enjoy this exclusive wealth report. It's 100% free and comes with no obligation. Rupert Hargreaves owns shares of Royal Dutch Shell B. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Royal Dutch Shell B. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
waldron
12/2/2017
18:06
Thanks for that waldron; interesting take on the BG deal.
sogoesit
12/2/2017
17:16
Https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/02/08/5-things-royal-dutch-shells-management-thinks-you.aspx
waldron
12/2/2017
08:32
google translation from french Shell: Société; Générale is no longer buying. Share with facebook share via e-mail 0 0 31/01/2017 | 10:05 Analysts of Société; Générale (SG) lowered their advice on the class B share of Royal Dutch Shell this morning, which comes back from "buying" to "keeping". After a good performance, it is time for the title of the 'major' oil and gas to "catch its breath," according to analysts. The 12-month target price is pegged from 2,500 to 2,450 pence. In fact, the Shell share performed well in 2016, posting a total performance (including dividends) of 36%, thanks to the re-appreciation of the stock which accompanied the recovery in crude oil prices. Without forgetting the smooth running of the asset disposal program linked to the integration of BG Group, a successful transaction welcomed as a growth accelerator for Shell. Societe Generale confirms a certain optimism: "We consider that Shell can potentially turn into a world class investment file", but not immediately: the horizon would be rather "several years", according to analysts. In the short term, Shell should put more emphasis on reducing its debt (about $ 20 billion) than its over-dividend, says SG. Hence the change of foot of the specialists.
waldron
11/2/2017
13:48
Http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/02/11/north-sea-set-roll-barrels-region-thrown-unlikely-lifeline/
waldron
11/2/2017
07:01
Http://www.hl.co.uk/shares/shares-search-results/r/royal-dutch-shell-plc-b-shares-eur0.07/broker-forecasts
waldron
11/2/2017
06:50
was asked to follow shares in a friends portfolio list i was surprised that rdsb was not included was told NEVER SELL SHELL I BELIEVE RDSB MIGHT WELL BREAK THRU 2275 NEXT WEEK TAKE CARE ALL
waldron
08/2/2017
19:53
Shell B Share News (RDSB) Italian Prosecutors Request Eni CEO, Shell Stand Trial--Update 08/02/2017 7:43pm Dow Jones News Shell B (LSE:RDSB) Intraday Stock Chart Today : Wednesday 8 February 2017 By Eric Sylvers MILAN -- Italian prosecutors have requested that Royal Dutch Shell PLC and the chief executive officer of Italian oil group Eni SpA stand trial over allegations of corruption tied to a large Nigerian oil deal, according to a person familiar with the situation. The prosecutors have requested that Eni CEO Claudio Descalzi and 10 other people, including former Eni executives and Nigerian officials, be tried for alleged corruption tied to a deal Shell and Eni struck in 2011 to gain control of an offshore oil block in Nigeria. At the time, the two companies won rights to the block after paying $1.3 billion. Eni paid the money to the Nigerian government, but about $1.1 billion was later transferred to a former oil minister, Dan Etete, according to documents from cases in the U.K. and Italy. Shell had already invested a large amount of money in the oil block and agreed to share the rights with the Italian group. In documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, Italian magistrates have maintained that Mr. Descalzi, then the head of exploration, and Paolo Scaroni, Eni's CEO at the time, knew the government escrow account was a stopover for the money before it moved onto an account controlled by Mr. Etete and was eventually paid as kickbacks. Mr. Descalzi took the helm in 2014 and has worked to refocus the companyand cuts costs to better prepare Eni to cope with low oil prices, He and Eni have denied any wrongdoing. The company has maintained that it doesn't use middlemen and that its executives only dealt with the Nigerian government in the deal for the offshore block. Eni has said that it bears no responsibility for where the money subsequently went. In a statement released Wednesday, Eni's board said that it believes Mr. Descalzi is innocent and expressed its support for the chief executive. A spokeswoman for Shell had no immediate comment. It will take weeks or even months before an Italian judge rules on the prosecutors' request for a trial. The requested indictments come just days after a Nigerian court ordered Eni and Shell to give up control of the large offshore oil block, which is known as OPL 245. Indictments in Italy could further embolden Nigerian officials to take on the two oil companies, according to analysts. The Nigerian case has proved embarrassing not only for Eni, which has long been dogged by corruption allegations, but also the Italian government that owns 30% of the company and appoints the top management. Mr. Descalzi's three-year term is set to expire in April and his renewal could be complicated by the court case. A trial and eventual appeals could drag on for more than five years. --Manuela Mesco contributed to this article. Write to Eric Sylvers at eric.sylvers@wsj.com (END) Dow Jones Newswires February 08, 2017 14:28 ET (19:28 GMT)
waldron
08/2/2017
15:22
Looks like a good place to be buying back in to me ...
mnomis
08/2/2017
15:02
Added a few.
essentialinvestor
08/2/2017
09:47
Shell's Brent plans to spark North Sea jobs boost hTtp://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/02/08/submits-plans-dismantle-north-sea-stalwart/
xxxxxy
07/2/2017
23:17
Oil Prices Tank After API Reports 2nd Biggest Crude Build In U.S. History By Julianne Geiger - Feb 07, 2017, 3:54 PM CST shale gas U.S. crude oil inventories increased by a whopping 14.227 million barrels, according to this week’s American Petroleum Institute (API) inventory report published on Tuesday afternoon, pressing down further on already falling prices. The build is the second largest build in U.S. history, according to Zerohedge. Analysts were anticipating a much more conservative crude oil inventory build of 2.38 million barrels, according to Market Realist. While reduced OPEC production for January has seemed to support higher oil prices, reports of OPEC’s accomplishments have lost some sway in recent weeks in the wake of the American Petroleum Institute and the Energy Information Administration reports, which have both reported weeks of builds for crude oil, along with Baker Hughes, which showed that US drillers are putting rigs into production at rates not seen since mid-2014 before the oil price crash began. Ads by While OPEC is reporting a 91% compliance to the deal reached in November 2016, Baker Hughes reported a 17-rig gain for oil, which followed a 15-rig increase the week prior. Prior to the API’s data release, Brent crude had traded down $0.22 since Friday’s rig count release. Brent crude was trading at $54.89 ($55.11 on Friday), while WTI crude traded at $52.03 ($52.83 on Friday). Related: Oil Prices Fall Ahead Of Inventory Data The API reported a 2.903-million-barrel build in gasoline inventories, and a 1.373-million-barrel build to distillates. Supplies at the Cushing, Oklahoma, facility also rose this week by 624,000 barrels. Last weeks’ EIA report showed a crude oil inventory build of 6.5 million barrels, which came a day after the API reported a 5.8-million-barrel build; and a 3.9-million-barrel build to gasoline compared with a 2.9-million-barrel build reported by the API. By Julianne Geiger for Oilprice.com
maywillow
07/2/2017
17:03
Business Energy BP, Shell hit after Opec output cuts end oil-trading boom February 7, 2017 | 6:56 PM by Bloomberg News AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to PrintShare to EmailShare to More Although better known for their oilfields, refineries and gas stations, Shell and BP are the world’s top energy traders, handling about 20 per cent of global oil demand. - Bloomberg News [BP, Shell hit after Opec output cuts end oil-trading boom] Sharelines BP, Shell hit after Opec output cuts end oil-trading boom BP, Shell hit after Opec output cuts end oil-trading boom London: The oil-trading boom that cushioned the profits of Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc through the price slump of 2015 and early 2016 is over. BP said on Tuesday it made a "small" loss trading oil in the fourth quarter, while Shell last week said trading profits "flattened" in late 2016. The fall off in trading contributed to worse-than-expected fourth-quarter profits at Europe’s largest oil and gas producers. Although better known for their oilfields, refineries and gas stations, Shell and BP are the world’s top energy traders, handling about 20 per cent of global oil demand between them and dwarfing independent trading houses such as Vitol Group BV, Trafigura Group and Glencore Plc. BP "simply had a weak fourth quarter" in oil trading, Brian Gilvary, the company’s chief financial officer, said in an interview, adding that BP managed to make a profit in overall trading once natural gas was included. BP said a court ruling late last year, which cost the trading division about $70 million, further hurt earnings. Oil traders thrived in 2015 and 2016 by taking advantage of an oversupply that led to an unusually strong contango market structure -- where contracts for future delivery trade higher than spot prices. The contango allows traders to buy oil cheap, store it and profit later by locking in their profit through derivatives in so-called "cash-and-carry" deals. As onshore depots filled up over the last two years, oil traders relied on supertankers for "floating storage" deals, at times anchoring ships for months in natural ports or near trading centers like Singapore. The contango has narrowed sharply since the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia cut production. The price difference between Brent crude for immediate delivery and the one-year forward dropped to a contango of $0.52 a barrel on Friday, the narrowest since September 2014 and well below the 2015 peak of $12 a barrel. Oil curve Oil traders predict the market could flip later this year into the opposite condition, backwardation, where prices for immediate delivery trade at a premium to forward contracts. The oil curve is “flat as a pancake,” Gilvary said, using an expression from his days as head of trading at BP. While contango opportunities no longer exist in crude trading, some remain for gasoline, he said. Oliver Wyman, a consultancy that publishes a benchmark annual review of the commodities trading industry, said the trading arms of BP and Shell enjoyed in 2015 their best year ever thanks to "low, volatile spot prices that created cash-and-carry opportunities." Total, the other major oil company with significant trading operations, reports quarterly earnings on Thursday. In contrast to their European rivals, Exxon Mobil Corp. and Chevron Corp. have smaller trading operations. Independent commodity trading houses have also seen profits from energy trading decline. Vitol, the largest independent oil trader, posted a 42 per cent drop in first-half 2016 profit, according to people familiar with the matter. Trafigura, the third-largest independent oil trader behind Vitol and Glencore, said in December that full-year gross profit from crude and petroleum product trading fell 13 per cent.
maywillow
04/2/2017
11:09
This week’s top Shell stories Shell news Written by Alan Shields - 04/02/2017 7:00 am Energy giant Shell was at the front and centre of some massive announcements this week that sent shockwaves through the oil and gas industry. After lengthy speculation the Anglo-Dutch firm finally announced the $3.8billion sale of it’s North Sea assets to Chrysaor. The package includes Shell’s interests in the Buzzard, Beryl, Bressay, Elgin-Franklin, J-Block, the Greater Armada cluster, Everest, Lomond and Erskine fields, plus a 10% stake in Schiehallion development. The Press and Journal’s Energy editor Jeremy Cresswell was one of the first to hail the handover as a “terrific deal”. Related Articles Ben van Beurden: Shell "reshaping" is beginning to bear fruit Shell's $30bn divestment programme: What we know so far Shell boss says stop viewing North Sea with 'nostalgia' He gave his insight into how much City sources knew about the deal and the movers and shakers who made it happen. Hot on the heels of the announcement was Shell’s fourth quarter and full year results for 2016. CEO Ben van Beurden said the supermajor was “streamlining its portfolio” following the landmark $52billion takeover of BG last year. Van Beurden was also quick to comment that the asset sale did not signal the end of the energy giant’s involvement in the North Sea but warned of nostalgia. The chief executive also said he did not anticipate any significant implications from Brexit.
maywillow
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