Buy
Sell
Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Vodafone Group Plc LSE:VOD London Ordinary Share GB00BH4HKS39 ORD USD0.20 20/21
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 127.92 0.00 00:00:00
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
127.92 128.00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mobile Telecommunications 39,964.45 706.45 -2.78 34,324
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:47:41 O 1,000,000 127.9098 GBX

Vodafone (VOD) Latest News

More Vodafone News
Vodafone Investors    Vodafone Takeover Rumours
Smart Money!
VOD is a large holding in the following funds:
 Fund  Percentage of Fund  Last Updated 
 EP GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES TRUST PLC 2.90% 2020-11-30

Vodafone (VOD) Discussions and Chat

Vodafone Forums and Chat

Date Time Title Posts
21/1/202116:29Vodaphone - 5G Into The Blue 2,418
21/1/202114:35Vodafone - Charts & News989
19/1/202116:23THE VODAFONE THREAD37,904
23/9/202006:09Vodafone1
01/9/202008:08 ***** Vodafone *****3,438

Add a New Thread

Vodafone (VOD) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
07:15:10127.911,000,0001,279,097.60O
07:15:09127.70100,000127,697.50O
2021-01-21 17:29:04127.941,000,0001,279,400.00O
2021-01-21 17:07:01127.883,4924,465.71O
2021-01-21 17:05:41127.6811,00014,044.91O
View all Vodafone trades in real-time

Vodafone (VOD) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
21/1/2021
08:20
Vodafone Daily Update: Vodafone Group Plc is listed in the Mobile Telecommunications sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker VOD. The last closing price for Vodafone was 127.92p.
Vodafone Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 119.78p and a 12 week average price of 101.86p.
The 1 year high share price is 157.86p while the 1 year low share price is currently 92.76p.
There are currently 26,832,067,065 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 63,737,457 shares. The market capitalisation of Vodafone Group Plc is £34,323,580,189.55.
18/1/2021
11:36
geckotheglorious: Vivek Badrinath, chief executive of Vantage Towers: 'I won't have Vodafone interfering in my life' Europe’s biggest mobile operator is selling off its masts under a new company called Vantage Towers When Vivek Badrinath was asked to leave Vodafone, on one level he was relieved. After three years jetting around the pre-pandemic world, selling off far-flung parts of the mobile empire as head of its non-European businesses, he was tired. “You spend two nights a week sleeping on a plane,” he recalls. “It’s the kind of job you do for some time and then at some point the music has to stop.” This was autumn 2019 and Vodafone’s chief executive, Nick Read, was asking Badrinath to lead his biggest sale yet on his way out. Saddled with too much debt from expanding its German broadband network, the operator needed to spin off and cash in its portfolio of 80,000 mobile masts across Europe. Badrinath leapt at the chance to lead the new company, now called Vantage Towers. “Nick came to see me in my office and said ‘Vivek I need to talk to you about something’. He told me about the opportunity and to think about it in the morning and by 5pm I was in his office telling him not to waste time thinking about other people for the role.” Little over a year later Vantage is almost ready to make its debut on the Frankfurt stock exchange at an expected valuation of more than €20bn (£17.8bn). Vodafone aims to capitalise on strong demand from investors for telecoms infrastructure assets, but it has been a tricky separation through the pandemic. “This is a startup that’s been born in a few hundred living rooms, home offices and children’s bedrooms,” says Badrinath. “And yet now we are coming to life.” Mobile operators themselves are out of favour with investors due to low growth and tight margins, under pressure from tough competition, tight regulation and the need for continuous investment in new equipment to meet demand for data. However companies who own the masts, or towers, on which that equipment sits are viewed as strong growth prospects with dependable, high-margin income from rent paid by their mobile operator tenants. Only in recent days Telxius, a mobile mast business spun out of the former Spanish state telecoms monopoly Telefonica, has been sold to an American towers specialist for €7.7bn, more than 30 times its trailing income. Last year in the UK the mobile masts arm of Arqiva, which rents access to all four operators, was acquired for £2bn. The buyer, Cellnex, went on to secure a €10bn pan-European takeover of masts owned by CK Hutchison, the owner of Three, including its UK sites. Vodafone’s UK masts, which are shared with rival O2, are to be rolled into Vantage under a deal thrashed out only last week. They will add €62m of annual earnings to take the total pot to €742m. At the same valuation maths as Telxius that would make Badrinath’s new venture worth getting on for €23bn. “The sector is exciting,” says the 51-year-old, who climbed the ranks of France’s former state operator, Orange, then made a detour into the hotel business with Accor, before joining Vodafone in 2016. “There is this big trend towards the commercialisation of towers and Europe is maybe 20 years behind the US.” Vodafone, Europe’s biggest mobile operator, played no small part in creating that gap. Its previous chief executive, Vittorio Colao, was a firm opponent of selling off what he saw as the family silver. Read clearly sees things differently, and Badrinath says the mobile world has changed such that owning and controlling masts is not so much of a competitive advantage. “It was a chief technology officer on the mobile side of Orange in 2004,” he says. “At that point in time the battle was probably still around coverage. “But once the main operators reached 90pc-plus coverage they lost the ability to differentiate just because they own a mast site. Now it is more efficient economically, operationally and for the environment to share the load of heavy duty infrastructure.̶1; Badrinath’s task is to convince more operators across its 10 European territories mobile industry to rent from it. While its relationship with Vodafone, which will remain a majority shareholder, is guaranteed, it needs to deliver growth by increasing the average number of tenants on each of its masts. The figure is currently 
less than 1.5. Vantage is confident the sheer demand for mobile data – he expects an increase of 2.4 times by 2025 – will boost occupancy. Developing 5G networks to cope will require denser patterns of masts, especially in cities, and sharing space will make sense for all. “It’s not just that we’re taking to the bank the number of contracts that we have for the existing networks,” says Badrinath. “There is growth for a number of reasons. There is absolutely no doubt that 5G will entail the need for more network and more capacity. Governments are selling spectrum on the condition that coverage is developed too.” Some mobile operators claim equipment breakthroughs have reduced the need for more masts, but even with its current 86pc revenue dependence on Vodafone, Vantage has more than 7,000 in the works. Badrinath says the question is one of timing, not need. “The need may not be instant,” he says. “Our model expects bigger densification after 2025, but it will come.” Following a court defeat for the European Commission’s competition watchdogs last year, hopes have risen among mobile operators that they may be allowed to consolidate via mergers. Such a wave might reduce the number of potential customers for Vantage over time, but Badrinath insists Vantage’s long, country-by-country Vodafone contracts and existing market structures would shield it. Vantage is not only depending on technological forces to deliver on high expectations for its independent future, anyway. Badrinath has been busy sharpening up its commercial operations, with a new sales staff to forge relationships with new customers. Meanwhile he plans to negotiate harder with the freeholders who it rents from. “What we have learned is we are good at managing masts from a technical point of view. We’ve been doing it for 25 years, so we should get no credit for that really. “Where we are not as good is on the commercial side and an area we can probably do better is landlord management. So I stood up a team and we’ve been hiring hungry commercial people from outside Vodafone. He or she doesn’t quite look like the nerdy, techie who is inside the operations.” For some Vodafone shareholders, the decision to list Vantage in Frankfurt rather than London is a disappointment. It reflects the company’s centre of gravity, however. It will have more than 19,000 German masts compared with a 50pc share in 14,200 in the UK, and most of its technical staff are based there. London stock exchange rules would also prevent a German corporation with less than 50pc of its shares in a free float from obtaining a premium listing, potentially cutting Vantage off from large pools of capital. “Germany was the most logical place to run this company from, that’s very clear,” says Badrinath, who will be overseen by chairman Rüdiger Grube, a veteran industrialist who “understands corporate governance and the need to give independence to the company in a very clear way”. “I won’t have Vodafone interfering in my life on operational and commercial decisions,” he adds, aware that potential new customers may be nervous of the link, at least at first. “We took care of that. It’s done, it’s put to bed.” It is perhaps a sign that as Badrinath and Vantage advance, Vodafone may be somewhat diminished.
22/12/2020
17:11
estienne: Shares Magazine: Vodafone said on Tuesday that it has offered more than €2 billion euros to buy out minority shareholders in Kabel Deutschland in a deal aimed at ending the saga with hedge fund Elliott Advisers and others over the buyout price offered for Kabel Deutschland. Vodafone shares drifted 0.7% lower on Tuesday to 121.07p. LOW TAKEOUT PRICE CLAIMS The UK company bought a near 77% stake in the German cable company in 2013 for €7.7 billion, a deal that Elliot and other minority stake owners argued was too low. This had led German courts to rule in favour of Vodafone in 2019, finding that the compensation offer was ‘adequate̵7;. Kabel Deutschland minority shareholders launched an appeal of that ruling. Today’s deal offers all minority shareholders a €103 per share cash payout, a settlement that Vodafone said shareholders representing 17% of stock had accepted, including Elliott Advisers. Vodafone, which acquired 76.8% of KDG in 2013, said it would own at least 93.8% of the business following completion of the offer. EARNINGS AND CREDIT RATING LIFT The company said consideration for the shares for which it had received undertakings would total €1.56 billion, rising to €2.12 billion if all minority shareholders accepted the deal. The acquisition sum would be funded from Vodafone's existing cash resources. Vodafone said the offer would be immediately earnings accretive, neutral to its credit ratings, and reduce its exposure to legal proceedings related to the Kabel Deutschland acquisition.
17/12/2020
06:41
muscletrade: Working from home connectivity failed to stop a “vicious”; 2020 for telecoms stocks, but a City bank’s telecoms team now sees substantial opportunities amid price upgrades for BT (LSE:BT.A) and Vodafone (LSE:VOD). The scale of the sell-off for the traditionally defensive sector surprised Deutsche Bank after European stocks were treated as super-cyclical with high correlation to their local indices. Even after recent vaccine breakthroughs helped BT, Vodafone and other European shares to rebound by 30%, total shareholder returns for the year-to-date still lag the rest of the market at 8% lower — continuing a five-year run of underperformance. Deutsche said in a note today: “This was remarkable as telcos are relatively less impacted by the economy and they are logically relative beneficiaries of home working.” ii view: Vodafone strategy can deliver much more Vodafone’s prospects and 7% dividend yield remain undervalued The immediate loss of mobile roaming and business-related revenues in the pandemic hurt sentiment, even though infrastructure valuations continued to rise over the period. Deutsche expects this focus on the monetisation of assets, such as Vodafone's plans for the Frankfurt IPO of its mobile towers business, to drive momentum in 2021 alongside an expected upward swing in economic fortunes. They wrote: “We expect a substantial improvement in European telco stock performances next year as growth improves, as returns become more sustainable, and as a number of operators move to highlight material discrepancies between public and private market valuations.” Its top picks in the European sector include Vodafone, whose target price it upgraded this week to 237p from 230p. The shares were 103p at the start of November and now trade at 131.76p. Deutsche expects Vodafone to see a pick-up in service revenues growth next year, particularly as global travel recommences and roaming metrics lap last year's sudden downturn. The company has a loyal following among retail investors, with a projected dividend yield of more than 6% for 2020 attractive at a time of pressure on FTSE 100 pay-outs.
11/11/2020
16:41
grupo guitarlumber: Vodafone’s prospects and 7% dividend yield remain undervalued by Graeme Evans from interactive investor | 11th November 2020 15:07 Share on: The shares are up over 10% this week, but there should be much more to come, argues this expert. vod tower The potential for a re-rating of Vodafone (LSE:VOD) shares was raised today when a leading industry analyst signalled the mobile phone giant is over the worst of its revenues downturn. UBS's Polo Tang said next Monday's second-quarter and half-year results were likely to represent a low point, with Q2 service revenues set to be 2.3% lower due to the impact of travel bans on roaming activity. He expects a recovery in the current quarter to 1.2% lower and says shares should be trading at 188p, compared with the 116p seen this afternoon after a rally of 9% so far this week on the back of the Pfizer vaccine breakthrough. The FTSE 100 stock is still no better off than in August, with Vodafone and BT (LSE:BT.A) among telecom stocks shunned in the pandemic despite their exposure to working from home trends. Vodafone shares: 8% dividend yield and potential to double Vodafone: Q1 results and an IPO in 2021 Vodafone: the logic behind 80% share price upside explained Take control of your retirement planning with our award-winning, low-cost Self-Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) Data usage on both mobile and fixed broadband continues to grow strongly, which should drive average revenues per user amid evidence that consumers are willing to pay more for services. The recent launch of a new 5G iPhone should stimulate demand, with Tang noting anecdotal evidence that Vodafone has performed relatively well in Germany, the UK and Netherlands. Tang thinks that the share price currently assumes no improvement in service revenues, leading to low-to-mid single digit annual earnings declines. He said: “While the shape of any recovery may not be linear, we see Vodafone as too cheap and see scope for the shares to re-rate as European service revenues recover.” The company has a loyal following among retail investors, based on factors such as its sheer size, cash generative ability and chunky dividend yield, which, at a projected 7.3% for 2020 trading, is attractive when many big companies have chosen not to pay out at all. UBS is not alone in thinking the company is undervalued, with Deutsche Bank recently highlighting a 230p price target based in part on the value of infrastructure assets and the prospect that the company will resume growth next year. A day after its Q2 update, Vodafone will shine a light on the broader value of the company's assets when it hosts a capital markets day for the planned Frankfurt IPO of Vantage Towers, which boasts 68,000 towers and leading positions in almost all of its nine markets. Vodafone: the logic behind 80% share price upside explained Take control of your retirement planning with our award-winning, low-cost Self-Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) Deutsche analyst Robert Grindle said recently that deals elsewhere in the sector had given a favourable view on assets within Vodafone, which he calculated were the highest of the European telco large-caps and equivalent to 75% of enterprise value. UBS's Tang thinks that next week's guidance from Vodafone will continue to point to a broadly flat underlying earnings picture for the full year and free cash flow in the region of more than 5 billion euros. European service revenues are forecast to be down 3.5% in the second quarter, improving to a fall of 2.1% in the current quarter. Deutsche recently noted the biggest threats to the Vodafone recovery as increased competition, foreign exchange volatility and execution risk on recently acquired assets from Liberty Global, as well as longer term economic malaise due to Covid-19. These articles are provided for information purposes only. Occasionally, an opinion about whether to buy or sell a specific investment may be provided by third parties. The content is not intended to be a personal recommendation to buy or sell any financial instrument or product, or to adopt any investment strategy as it is not provided based on an assessment of your investing knowledge and experience, your financial situation or your investment objectives. The value of your investments, and the income derived from them, may go down as well as up. You may not get back all the money that you invest. The investments referred to in this article may not be suitable for all investors, and if in doubt, an investor should seek advice from a qualified investment adviser. Full performance can be found on the company or index summary page on the interactive investor website. Simply click on the company's or index name highlighted in the article.
21/10/2020
11:00
spud: https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/news/vodafone-share-price-one-best-092443416.html Vodafone has been working through some severe headwinds over the past few years. Rising competition in its core UK and European markets, as well as an ongoing battle with authorities in India, have dampened investor sentiment towards the group. A highly leveraged balance sheet also forced management to cut the company’s dividend last year, to free up more cash for debt repayment. However, it looks as if the business has worked through many of these issues. A couple of months ago, the group announced that it would stick by its final dividend for the year. This was thanks to free cash flow growing by more than a tenth to €4.9bn during the first half. Meanwhile, pre-tax return on capital employed — a measure of profitability for every £1 invested in the business — rose from 5.3% to 6.1%. These numbers tell me that Vodafone is progressing with its transformation. Indeed, management attributed part of the higher return on assets to the group’s digital transformation and improving asset utilisation. Unfortunately, group debt continues to weigh on the Vodafone share price. Net debt ballooned by more than half to €42.2bn in the first part of the company’s current financial year. The purchase of Liberty Global‘s European assets was responsible for a large part of the increase. Still, the group says it’s on track to list its European tower business in the first half of next year, which should give the company a cash infusion. It’s also planning to deliver €1bn net cost savings from its three-year digital transformation programme. Considering all of the above, I reckon that while the near term outlook for the Vodafone share price is uncertain, in the medium to long term, the stock should prove to be a good investment. More importantly, it doesn’t seem as if the company is going to cut its dividend again any time soon. That’s good news for income investors. The stock currently supports a dividend yield of 7.5%, giving it one of the highest dividend yields in the FTSE 100. This level of income also implies that investors will be paid to wait for the company’s turnaround to play out. Further, the Vodafone share price looks desperately cheap after recent declines. The stock is trading at an enterprise value-to-earnings before interest tax depreciation and amortisation (EV/EBITDA) ratio of 4.2. The rest of the telecommunications sector is dealing at an EV/EBITDA ratio of 5.2, suggesting Vodafone is undervalued by around 25%. spud
08/10/2020
06:00
muscletrade: The working from home trends driving tech stocks Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) have so far done little for shares in the telecoms sector after a woeful year for the likes of Vodafone and BT Group. The gulf in tech/telco performance was highlighted today by Deutsche Bank in a note focusing on Vodafone, whose share price it thinks is out of kilter with fundamentals. As such, it should be trading at 230p rather than near to a post-Covid low of around 110p currently. Deutsche said telco business models are substantially resilient to Covid-19 and should benefit from the working from home phenomenon, given increased internet usage and data traffic. The lack of international travel is one negative factor due to the impact on roaming revenues, with Vodafone's exposure to emerging market currencies another drag in the pandemic. The shares had rallied 40% to 141p by mid-June — helped by the payment of a 4.5 cents final dividend in annual results — but have fallen back again in recent weeks. They are now trading at just 12p or 12% above their March low, despite Q1 figures in July highlighting service revenues in line with expectations. It's been a similar share price story at BT Group (LSE:BT.A), although its lowly £10 billion valuation more reflects the uncertainty caused by the cost of funding the rapid roll-out of full-fibre broadband. Deutsche thinks market forces may be at play in the sector's underperformance, given that local indices account for about 75% of the variation in European telco stock price moves. Following on from this logic, a post-Brexit trade deal could work in favour of the sector. The bank added: “In the absence of a deal, telcos should be less impacted due to their predominantly domestic nature and outperform the UK market at least.” One big reason for Deutsche favouring Vodafone is the company's ability to continue paying a healthy dividend with an 8% yield. The bank also highlighted the value of Voda's infrastructure assets and the prospect that the company will resume growth next year. It is also looking forward to next year's Frankfurt IPO of Vantage Towers, the company's phone masts business boasting 68,000 towers and leading positions in almost all of its nine markets. A capital markets day due on 17 November will focus on the Vantage sale and should at least help shine a light on the broader value of the company's assets. Deutsche also expects half-year results due the day before to provide investors with some encouragement on Vodafone's trading outlook and dividend policy. The company has a loyal following among retail investors, based on factors such as its sheer size, cash generative ability and chunky dividend yield, which is particularly attractive when many companies have recently chosen not to pay out at all. Deutsche added: “Chief risks to our ‘buy’ rating stem from increased competition, forex volatility, execution on integrating recently acquired assets and longer-term economic malaise due to the virus.”
07/10/2020
12:56
ariane: Vodafone shares: 8% dividend yield and potential to double by Graeme Evans from interactive investor | 7th October 2020 12:55 This expert believes a post-Brexit trade deal could boost the sector and share prices. The working from home trends driving tech stocks Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) have so far done little for shares in the telecoms sector after a woeful year for the likes of Vodafone and BT Group. The gulf in tech/telco performance was highlighted today by Deutsche Bank in a note focusing on Vodafone, whose share price it thinks is out of kilter with fundamentals. As such, it should be trading at 230p rather than near to a post-Covid low of around 110p currently. Deutsche said telco business models are substantially resilient to Covid-19 and should benefit from the working from home phenomenon, given increased internet usage and data traffic. The lack of international travel is one negative factor due to the impact on roaming revenues, with Vodafone's exposure to emerging market currencies another drag in the pandemic. The shares had rallied 40% to 141p by mid-June — helped by the payment of a 4.5 cents final dividend in annual results — but have fallen back again in recent weeks. They are now trading at just 12p or 12% above their March low, despite Q1 figures in July highlighting service revenues in line with expectations. Vodafone: Q1 results and an IPO in 2021 Share Sleuth: putting profits to work to add a new holding It's been a similar share price story at BT Group (LSE:BT.A), although its lowly £10 billion valuation more reflects the uncertainty caused by the cost of funding the rapid roll-out of full-fibre broadband. Deutsche thinks market forces may be at play in the sector's underperformance, given that local indices account for about 75% of the variation in European telco stock price moves. Following on from this logic, a post-Brexit trade deal could work in favour of the sector. The bank added: “In the absence of a deal, telcos should be less impacted due to their predominantly domestic nature and outperform the UK market at least.” One big reason for Deutsche favouring Vodafone is the company's ability to continue paying a healthy dividend with an 8% yield. The bank also highlighted the value of Voda's infrastructure assets and the prospect that the company will resume growth next year. It is also looking forward to next year's Frankfurt IPO of Vantage Towers, the company's phone masts business boasting 68,000 towers and leading positions in almost all of its nine markets. A capital markets day due on 17 November will focus on the Vantage sale and should at least help shine a light on the broader value of the company's assets. Deutsche also expects half-year results due the day before to provide investors with some encouragement on Vodafone's trading outlook and dividend policy. The company has a loyal following among retail investors, based on factors such as its sheer size, cash generative ability and chunky dividend yield, which is particularly attractive when many companies have recently chosen not to pay out at all. Deutsche added: “Chief risks to our ‘buy’ rating stem from increased competition, forex volatility, execution on integrating recently acquired assets and longer-term economic malaise due to the virus.”
05/10/2020
14:54
davius: I have been mostly out of everything since March, just trading shares from time to time whenever I thought something looked good value, or when the markets took one of their frequent hits. Lately I've been buying Vodafone, I've always been attracted to it in the region of a pound and have been buying for a month or so. The indicative price of the towers business is worth about 70p per share, a share price under 140p looks attractive. II Closing report this afternoon: Vodafone closed up 4.7% after the telecommunications firm noted progress on the merger of Indus Towers and Bharti Infratel following the satisfaction of certain conditions. The merger - first agreed in April 2018 - will see Vodafone merge its Indian mobile tower joint venture with a local rival to create the world's second largest tower mobile company. The FTSE 100-listed telecoms company said the agreement to proceed with the merger was conditional on consent for a security package for the benefit of the combined company from Vodafone's existing lenders for the EUR1.3 billion loan used to fund Vodafone's contribution to the Vodafone Idea rights issue in 2019. On Monday, Vodafone stated that consent has now been received from its lenders, adding that all parties will now approach the National Company Law Tribunal to make the merger scheme effective.
05/10/2020
10:55
spud: https://www.standard.co.uk/business/vodafone-ipo-flotation-vantage-towers-a4563161.html Vodafone today hired a big shot German industrialist to chair its huge international phone masts division ahead of its stock market flotation planned for next year in an IPO that could value it at e20 billion. Rudiger Grube, former boss of the German rail giant Deutsche Bahn and ex-chairman of Airbus was hired to head Vantage Towers' supervisory board "in preparation for its IPO in early 2021", Vodafone said. The business is expected to float on the Frankfurt exchange, leading to Vodafone shareholders getting back billions of euros of value for the business, which owns 68,000 towers across nine countries. Grube had a long career at Daimler before becoming chief executive of Deutsche Bahn. Vodafone cited his experience in running capital intensive infrastructure projects as well as service-based industries. It also said he had strong political and business connections in Europe and was used to dealing with companies with varying stakeholder interests to manage. Vodafone is assembling an independent board for Vantage Towers as it prepares the ground for its giant flotation. The company's shares have underperformed for years and the flotation is hoped to reinvigorate the price. Vantage's team are expected to be urging fund managers to invest in the IPO to capture profits from future growth from 5G rollout as big telecoms operators use its masts to put up their infrastructure. They are also expected to pitch it more generally as an investment play in the growth of data usage. Vantage Towers chief executive Vivek Badrinath said: "I look forward to working with [Grube] and the wider supervisory board to drive our strategy to enable Europe's digital transformation and to benefit from the attractive long-term trends delivering growth and value opportunities across each of our markets." Grube said he looked forward to "delivering a successful IPO". Vodafone will retain a majority stake in the business after the flotation, which Barclays analysts have valued at about e21 billion based on the value of Italian towers company Inwit. Towers businesses such as Inwit and Spain's Cellnex have increased in value over the past 18 months, encouraging big telecoms companies to sell. Vodafone chose Frankfurt over London for the float during the summer. It was seen as a blow for the London Stock Exchange but Vodafone chief executive Nick Read said the decision had been made because the lion's share of the masts were in Germany so it would attract more investors there. Vodafone hired long-term Heineken chief executive Jean-Francois Van Boxmeer as its group chairman in May. spud
30/8/2020
22:14
buywell3: What will happen in 2021 ? SARS-CoV-2 does not look like going away IMO as worldwide case numbers confirm India is in a very bad situation and looks like taking worldwide numbers to 50M by Nov 5th IMO Is there a case to be made for increasing Covid-19 case numbers = increasing VOD share price ?
Vodafone share price data is direct from the London Stock Exchange
ADVFN Advertorial
Your Recent History
LSE
VOD
Vodafone
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20210122 07:36:00