Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Rolls-Royce Holdings LSE:RR. London Ordinary Share GB00B63H8491 ORD SHS 20P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -2.50p -0.28% 888.00p 888.00p 888.50p 891.00p 886.00p 889.50p 654,256 12:47:22
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Aerospace & Defence 14,955.0 -4,636.0 -220.1 - 16,344.44

Rolls-Royce Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3276 to 3297 of 3300 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
20/11/2017
09:41
New Accounting Rule to Revamp Firms' Financials -- WSJ 20/11/2017 8:02am Dow Jones News Rolls-Royce (LSE:RR.) Intraday Stock Chart Today : Monday 20 November 2017 Click Here for more Rolls-Royce Charts. By Nina Trentmann This article is being republished as part of our daily reproduction of WSJ.com articles that also appeared in the U.S. print edition of The Wall Street Journal (November 20, 2017). Finance managers at Rolls-Royce Holdings PLC two years ago predicted a plunge in the aircraft engine maker's 2018 revenue and profit. Starting Jan. 1, 2018, Rolls-Royce will no longer be able to put money from maintenance contracts on its books years before it begins to do the work. The company must wait to record that revenue until the actual service is provided, said John Dawson, director of investor relations. This is typically years after the company sells the engines at a loss. The change is the result of a new accounting standard that will force businesses in more than 100 countries to rejigger how they recognize revenue. It is similar to a rule U.S. public companies will have to follow as of Dec. 15. The new rules come as Rolls-Royce's order book is growing. Customers have placed around 500 orders for large engines that include Rolls-Royce's "TotalCare" maintenance program for next year, up from 450 this year and around 320 in 2016. When executives at Rolls-Royce recalculated some of the company's 2015 results using the new accounting rules, both revenue and profit were GBP900 million ($1.18 billion) lower than reported. Rolls-Royce started updating investors, analysts and other stakeholders about potential changes to its financials about a year and a half ago, earlier than most other companies. "We have been proactive in handling this," said Mr. Dawson. The new rules will supersede virtually all existing revenue recognition requirements under International Financial Reporting Standards. A similar change is under way with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Under both standards, companies will be required to provide more detailed information about their contracts and accounting judgments, some of which they haven't gathered before. Some sectors, such as telecommunications, media and pharmaceuticals, are expected to be affected more than others. So far, 29% of FTSE 100 companies still haven't disclosed an impact assessment, according to a September report by KPMG LLP. "The impact will vary, depending on the individual company, their sector and their business model," said Nick Chandler, a partner at KPMG. The new revenue standard "requires a far deeper understanding of companies' contracts than previous rules. It's a huge exercise," Mr. Chandler said. According to the KPMG study, only a small number of firms -- 9% -- expect the new rules to have a material effect. Still, all listed companies filing results under international financial reporting standards must publicly disclose that they have assessed the impact. Deutsche Telekom AG is one company that expects a material change to its financials. The German telecommunications company's 2018 opening balance sheet will reflect a one-time increase of EUR3 to EUR4 billion ($3.5 billion to $4.7 billion) in retained earnings. Going forward, the company is expected to post lower revenue in its mobile-service business but higher revenue in its hardware business starting from the first quarter. The company also will have to provide more details about how it subsidizes the cost of a mobile phone with revenue from contracts sold alongside the device, said Guillaume Maisondieu, head of group accounting. Deutsche Telekom has had around 50 people working on implementing the new standard for the past two years, Mr. Maisondieu said. That compares with several hundred employees are involved with preparing the company's financial statements. The company plans to host webinars and calls to educate investors and other stakeholders about the accounting changes early next year, Mr. Maisondieu said. By contrast, competitor Vodafone Group PLC has only indicated that the rules will apply to its results for the financial year commencing April 1, 2018. "We will have something to talk about later this year," said a spokesman of the British telecommunications firm. Analysts say companies' impact assessments of accounting rules help them adjust their forecasts. "In terms of my models, there were many material changes to the numbers in the profit and loss account" for Rolls-Royce, said Sandy Morris, an analyst at Jefferies LLC who covers the company. Mr. Morris said the company's disclosures and information sessions "were extremely helpful." But not every company is so forthcoming. There have been limited instances of companies sharing "insightful" information, said Vincent Papa, director of financial reporting at the CFA Institute, the global association of investment professionals. "Many companies seem to be crawling to the starting line," he said. The last opportunity for companies to disclose the potential impact of the new rules is in their financial results for the period ending Dec. 31, said KPMG's Mr. Chandler. These are usually filed six to eight weeks after companies close their books. Germany's SAP SE has indicated the new accounting standard won't be material for its revenue. Still, some components of the balance sheet at SAP could look different next year, said finance chief Luka Mucic. "The transition to the new standard requires a considerable amount of work," he said.
waldron
17/11/2017
08:24
Mrs at wanted an economy that was not dominated by militant trade unions. Low wage increases are a feature of the global economy a present e.g.USA,Japan,Germany,UK,France.
standish11
16/11/2017
20:48
Evening Standard article pumping RR bid to build SMRhTTps://www.standard.co.uk/business/anthony-hilton-rollsroyce-could-have-what-hammond-needs-a3692606.htmlUnfortunately Mrs T wanted a service economy and after all governments since have followed her lead, that's exactly what we have, along with the low wages that go with it. So no point government bleating on about low productivity if they are not prepared to do what's necessary to change it.
rogerrail
16/11/2017
12:25
but many other companies in the same position as RR. do not bother.
careful
16/11/2017
12:18
Try this (for a start) which explains the individual shareholder's position regarding the payment (not necessarily the reason why the company uses this mechanism): https://www.rolls-royce.com/investors/shareholder-information/payments-to-shareholders.aspx#tax-implications As the link states, it's implications make the payment tax free for most people, except those who have to complete a CGT return each year. Undoubtedly, it's a bit of a pain for those few individuals, but once you get the hang of it, it's a straightforward calculation using the figures provided each six months by the company. As a side effect, it does reduce the original acquisition cost as you go along.
grahamburn
16/11/2017
12:05
grahamburn Yes, you are right. I read the same years ago.
minerve
16/11/2017
11:51
You need to go way way back (many years) to see the rationale for the use of C shares (ie return of capital rather than a dividend as such). From memory it's because there are distinct corporation tax advantages for the company due to the high level of foreign earnings.... but sure someone will have the info at their fingertips. nb Sorry can't be bothered to go back to look at the relevant announcement, though it might be on their website somewhere.
grahamburn
16/11/2017
11:12
Take the cash and then buy back in on your timing and not theirs.
minerve
16/11/2017
11:10
Seems like the divi is in C shares amy views on keeping them or the other options?
tonsil
13/11/2017
12:35
Surprised that wasn't publicised more. The loss of water in the Dead Sea is a problem but much from rivers is used in agriculture now. There was a proposal to feed water from the Gulf of Aqaba.
dafrog
13/11/2017
12:35
dafrog they have , it's the government that are dragging their feet, but nothing new there spineless waste of space the lot of them: "In 2015 the then chancellor George Osborne promised £250m over five years for a nuclear research and development programme, an undisclosed sum of which was for a competition to pave the way for small modular reactors. These reactors are much smaller than conventional nuclear plants with a capacity of less than 300MW – or a 10th of what Hinkley Point C should provide. Britain's energy supply is in jeopardy after Brexit, warn MPs But the government has failed to even publish results of the first phase of the competition, expected last autumn, which the Lords science and technology committee said was “particularly alarming” hTTtps://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/may/02/alarm-sounded-over-delays-to-develop-uk-mini-nuclear-reactors
rogerrail
13/11/2017
11:32
Thursday, 9 November 2017 Rolls-Royce has today signed a Memorandum of Understanding with state-owned Jordan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) to conduct a technical feasibility study for the construction of a Rolls-Royce Small Modular Reactor (SMR) in Jordan, highlighting the growing international interest in small modular nuclear technology. The signing took place at the British Embassy, Paris, between Alan Woods, Strategy and Business Development Director, Rolls-Royce and Dr. Kamal Araj, Vice Chairman, JAEC. Harry Holt, President – Nuclear, Rolls-Royce, said: “We’re pleased to work with JAEC to look at the benefits that SMRs could deliver to Jordan. “With demand for global energy set to rise due to new technologies such as electric cars and increasing requirements for water desalination and district cooling, international interest in Rolls-Royce small modular reactor technology is growing. It represents an important British export opportunity.” Dr. Khaled Toukan, Chairman JAEC, said: “SMRs offer unique opportunities to address many of the challenges confronting Jordan, in particular water scarcity and small grid size, through the introduction of nuclear in the country as part of the energy mix.” The two organisations will now work together to define the technical, safety, economic and financial requirements for constructing a Rolls-Royce SMR power station in Jordan for electricity generation and water desalination. The outcome of the feasibility study will be used to inform an investment decision by JAEC to move forward to project delivery phase. Rolls-Royce is leading a consortium of British companies to design a small modular reactor power station to deliver low cost, low carbon energy to help the UK meet its carbon commitments. The Rolls-Royce-led UK SMR could produce reliable energy for as low as £60 per megawatt hour – competitive against wind and solar – and through its innovative approach to modular construction, can avoid the complexities, delays and overspends often associated with large infrastructure projects.
standish11
13/11/2017
11:28
They should put in hard proposals then and let the government put up its view.
dafrog
13/11/2017
11:25
Brief piece in The Times Business News today in its "Commentary" column on a potential growth area (if only government would sort its policy out!): ________________________________ Nuclear option It is said that the head of nuclear at Rolls-Royce can kill a man with a spoon. In reality, former senior army officer Harry Holt doesn’t need a spoon. Bare hands or not, he may feel like wringing a few BEIS departmental necks in the coming months. Mr Holt is a one-man, joined-up industrial strategy. He is proposing that Rolls takes its 50 years’ experience powering the nation’s nuclear submarines to develop small modular reactors, 440-megawatt mini-nuclear plants that can be sited to replace the country’s soon-to-be-retired nuclear power stations. In doing so, he promises to recreate a British nuclear industry, build three factories, employ 40,000 people and then export the technology to help with the balance of payments. Not only will such mini-reactors fill Britain’s need for baseload energy generation, they will deliver it more cheaply than offshore wind. This is all so seductively appealing that you’d think it would be on page one of the industrial strategy. It won’t, of course, and there are no signs of BEIS moving on it at anything other than glacial pace. Yes, it is unproven technology from a company not quite off the naughty step with either investors or fraud investigators. Yet if we are to have a bold industrial policy, then there are some projects worth co-investing in and turning into winners.
grahamburn
13/11/2017
08:55
Emirates selecting the 787 and most likely GE engines rather than the A350xwb is a massive blow for RR. There is also speculation that if Emirates place a further order for A380s they will revert to the competing American engines.
standish11
13/11/2017
08:32
So, nothing announced?
rayrac
07/11/2017
10:06
https://www.rolls-royce.com/~/media/Files/R/Rolls-Royce/documents/customers/nuclear/smr-brochure-july-2017.pdf
minerve
31/10/2017
10:27
Qatar Airways has agreed to pick up four finished Airbus A350-900s, four months after the Middle Eastern carrier cancelled delivery of the aircraft. Airbus says the airline has agreed to "continue to take delivery" of the four associated aircraft by the end of the year. Qatar Airways had 43 A350-900s on order but cut four of them in June, leaving it with a total commitment of 39. By the end of September the carrier had taken delivery of 15 of them. Qatar Airways has also ordered 37 A350-1000s. The first of these is still due for delivery before the year-end. Airbus chief financial officer Harald Wilhelm, speaking during a third-quarter briefing, said the ramp-up of A350 was progressing well.
standish11
27/10/2017
22:05
Do I see an impending 2 yr high? My portfolio could do with a bit of a surplus for a change...
wad collector
27/10/2017
19:36
Another positive is the pension fund surplus. This is a rare situation in these times. This months pension statement says that the surplus will further increase from last years healthy surplus. It will not confirmed for a while, but it is 'anticipated'. Good news.
careful
27/10/2017
16:52
RogerRail. Possibly,although the Letter of intent to buy the 787s was actually signed in Feb 2017 and it was the formal contract which was signed a few days ago. I am hoping that it could be due to some positive update from Emirates re an A350 or A380 order in the light of Emirates CEOs comments in Sept. http://www.aviationbusinessme.com/airlines/airline-operations/2017/sep/10/446962/
standish11
27/10/2017
16:06
Maybe its due to another 19 x 787 orders for Singapore Airlines on its way, though I doubt it hTTps://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/news/60810-singapore-airlines-finalizes-order-for-39-widebody-aircraft
rogerrail
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