Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Oxford Biomedica LSE:OXB London Ordinary Share GB0006648157 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 10.40p 10.20p 10.52p - - - 0 06:40:26
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Pharmaceuticals & Biotechnology 27.8 -20.3 -0.6 - 323.14

Oxford Biomedica Share Discussion Threads

Showing 101701 to 101725 of 101725 messages
Chat Pages: 4069  4068  4067  4066  4065  4064  4063  4062  4061  4060  4059  4058  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
21/1/2018
23:37
Mystic Meg forecast for this coming week... Low volume days with a steadily rising price. Lucky colour - grey. Lucky tyre - Goodyear. Lucky postman - Cyril.
harry s truman
21/1/2018
13:08
Interesting HTTPS://youtu.be/h2vs3lPPtBo?t=613 5T4 is found in tumors including the colorectal, ovarian, and gastric. Its expression is used as a prognostic aid in these cases. It has very limited expression in normal tissue but is widespread in malignant tumours throughout their development. One study found that 5T4 was present in 85% of a cohort of 72 colorectal carcinomas and in 81% of a cohort of 27 gastric carcinomas.[8] Its confined expression appears to give 5T4 the potential to be a target for T cells in cancer immunotherapy. There has been extensive research into its role in antibody-directed immunotherapy through the use of the high-affinity murine monoclonal antibody, mAb5T4, to deliver response modifiers (such as staphylococcus aureus superantigen) accurately to a tumor. 5T4 is also the target of the cancer vaccine TroVax which is in clinical trials for the treatment of a range of different solid tumour types.
marcusl2
21/1/2018
12:45
I must admit to thinking we might end up with 5.95%. But I see you are right, max seems to be 2 x 1.95%.
rrr
21/1/2018
11:51
rrr, The (near) 4% that we mention is the initial percentage plus that figure you mention (should it all go to planned). Pretty sure that we don't end up with nearly 6% and that what we have already is just below 2%.
harry s truman
21/1/2018
11:50
Also in The Times a child getting Strimvelis for ADA-SCID. Orchard should get their version passed this year. Perhaps OXB have transferred Lenti technology to Orchard? HTTPS://www.thetimes.co.uk/imageserver/image/methode%2Fsundaytimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2F6f9f3868-fe22-11e7-ba61-5366488da64d.jpg?crop=2250%2C1500%2C0%2C0 HTTPS://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/drug-that-rewrites-genes-offers-hope-to-children-ht78vkxcb WHY GENE THERAPY IS NO LONGER A PIPE DREAM After decades of disappointment, cures to once-incurable diseases seem within reach. HTTPS://psmag.com/social-justice/gene-therapy-no-longer-pipe-dream
marcusl2
21/1/2018
10:39
Re Celgene bid for Juno from Sunday Timeshttp://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/b9d7ab04-fe13-11e7-9455-432f4ff19004
beanol
20/1/2018
22:01
Whether this actually developed at all is not clear to me. The whole thing is written in future tense. Oxford WILL receive..... etc. etc. RNS Oxford BioMedica Announces a Strategic Alliance with Orchard Therapeutics Oxford, UK & London, UK- 29 November 2016: Oxford BioMedica plc ("Oxford BioMedica" or "the Group") (LSE: OXB), a leading gene and cell therapy group, today announces it has entered into a strategic alliance with Orchard Therapeutics ("Orchard"), a biotechnology company dedicated to bringing transformative ex-vivo stem cell based gene therapies to patients with serious and life-threatening orphan diseases. As part of the agreement the Group will develop and supply lentiviral vectors used by Orchard for the manufacture of ex-vivo gene therapy products in primary immune deficiency disorders and inherited metabolic disorders, including adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), Mucopolysaccharidosis-IIIA (MPS-IIIA or Sanfilippo Syndrome type A) and undisclosed follow-on indications. Orchard will lead the global clinical development and commercialisation of collaboration programmes in Europe, the United States and in other regions. Under the terms of the collaboration and licence agreement, Oxford BioMedica will receive a 1.95% equity stake in Orchard and will be entitled to royalties on future sales of products covered by the collaboration. The Group will provide process development services and manufacture clinical and commercial GMP-grade lentiviral vectors for Orchard. The process development arrangements include performance-related incentives through which Oxford BioMedica could receive a further 1.95% equity stake in Orchard. The Group has also granted an exclusive intellectual property licence to Orchard for collaboration programmes. John Dawson, Chief Executive Officer of Oxford BioMedica, commented: "We are delighted to initiate a Strategic Alliance with Orchard Therapeutics and look forward to working with them to develop and launch much needed treatments for patients in desperate need of better treatment options. The alliance combines Oxford BioMedica's world-leading capabilities in lentiviral vector process development and bioprocessing expertise with Orchard's expertise in the development and commercialisation of gene therapies for orphan diseases. This further demonstrates Oxford BioMedica's position as a "go to" partner for companies and academic institutions working with lentiviral vector based products." Stewart Craig, Chief Manufacturing Officer of Orchard Therapeutics Ltd., commented: "Orchard is a leader in bringing transformative gene therapies to patients with serious and life threatening orphan diseases. This alliance with Oxford BioMedica represents a key element of the supply chain for manufacture of our ex vivo gene-modified stem cell products. We expect that Oxford BioMedica's expertise in the development and manufacture of lentiviral vectors, along with their proven experience of working with global pharma companies will accelerate our ability to potentially address a series of devastating genetic diseases. We are excited about the potential for this alliance to deliver real patient benefits."
prambigear
20/1/2018
21:35
So orchard are building their own in house vector capability? I thought we were supplying them? Does anyone understands the business relationship we have which means we own 4%.
philh75
20/1/2018
21:15
It`s a shoe-in H. Just a case of when. Orchard’s lead program, OTL-101, autologous lentiviral gene therapy for ADA-SCID (adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency), is anticipated to become one of the first gene therapies approved by the FDA. HTTPS://www.biospace.com/job/1825933/it-service-delivery-analyst-innovative-gene-therapy-start-up/ Such activities will include building and leading the team responsible for development, scale-up, validation and execution of lentiviral vector manufacturing processes and controls to support OTL’s programs from pre-clinical studies through to product commercialization. HTTPS://www.biospace.com/job/1825929/vice-president-vector-operations-innovative-gene-therapy/
marcusl2
20/1/2018
12:25
old sage, I'm really hopeful for this year too and like you I feel that the first Novartis payments (for commercial production batches) will be banked now, with that continuing as the norm and thus OXB shouldn't be burning cash any longer. It's difficult to say for sure until JD actually tells us, but even if they haven't actually achieved break even on a month by month basis yet, the cash burn will be minimal. For me the upsides for this year are the new markets (and new diseases) to be treated by Novartis with CAR-T. Downsides would be the usual shortfall between the possibilities that JD muses in his biannual speeches and what actually transpires. At the end of the day his job is to sell OXB, both to customers and investors, and so he has to be constantly optimistic (at least publicly). He has done some good things for OXB, the Orchard deal being an example. If that works out well (and the odds of that are quite good) then OXB will end up with nearly 4% of that company. But, the jury is out for 2018's performance and we are all interested in what he can actually pull off. He did say in one of his 2017 speeches that the commercial / contracts department at OXB was struggling to cope with the number of approaches (or similar words to that effect). With the benefit of hindsight though, the flip side of that optimism was another comment from the same presentation where he was also hoping to make important announcements towards the end of 2017. He has a difficult job (can't please everybody) and takes a lot of flak. But he also gets paid a lot of money to take that and in past years has taken quite a bit from me. But his factory based business plan (whether actually as intended or not) has worked out really well for us and I'm very happy with that result. If he can bring in more partners / more deals during 2018 (those prospects from 2017 may simply be late - both JD and Tim have opined about how long these things take) then I will be pleased to see that too. Just have to wait and see really (not that we have much of an option), but he runs a company which holds the I.P. for a commercially approved LentiVector which is proven safe and effective in many different trial treatments, is recognised as having a large payload and he has 2 factories to manufacture it. It should all be there for him.
harry s truman
20/1/2018
11:52
But at the risk of sounding a bit flippant Marcus, why would they not approve it? Appreciate that we have a vested interest in this, but so do the patients. For those who respond well to the current best first line treatment then this makes no odds. But for those who relapse on that (possibly multiple times) then it's the odds of finding a good bone marrow donor or CAR-T. The latter seems to do a lot better for patients - certainly on the data of people treated so far. Can't imagine the EU regulator saying no. If they do say no, or possibly delay, then all it means is that people who can raise the funds will travel to America for treatment. People who can't will suffer the consequences of that decision.
harry s truman
20/1/2018
10:08
Heitner Enschede said: “They (Novartis) shared an interesting interim analysis showing complete remissions and sustainability up to six months. I think that what is key is that Kymriah is going beyond the paediatric B-cell ALL indication.” Kymriah is already under review in the EU, and there was interest in whether regulators sitting on the European Medicines Agency’s CHMP committee will reach the same conclusions as their colleagues at the FDA. “The next question for CAR-T is when is it going beyond the US? Are we going to have approvals in Europe? That’s what is expected for Kymriah in 2018. I think this is key to broaden the program globally.” Although CAR-Ts dominated this year’s ASH, small molecule drugs still have a role to play in blood cancer, and gene therapies could start to transform care for diseases such as haemophilia. The field is also fast moving as CAR-Ts are getting approved on the basis of smaller trials, because of the strong efficacy data. It’s therefore hard to predict what will be headlining at the next ASH conference, and scientists’ understanding and perception of these cutting-edge therapies could be very different by the time ASH 2018 opens its doors in San Diego in December. HTTPS://pharmaphorum.com/views-and-analysis/car-ts-dominated-agenda-ash-2017/
marcusl2
19/1/2018
21:54
Novartis Full Year report this Thursday... HTTPS://www.novartis.com/investors/event-calendar#ui-id-1=0 Might be some snippets
trovax
19/1/2018
21:15
Excellent research HST & Marcus, I share your optimism regarding prospects for OXB- especially as we're into positive cash flow territory, after decades(?)in the doldrums. Should be an interesting year for OXB, their SP,and their LTH.
old sage
19/1/2018
19:59
This great era that we have been waiting for is here, and we now have a therapy that works for patients who don't have any other options. How have you noticed the approvals of axicabtagene and tisagenlecleucel impacting the treatment landscape? We have seen a big uptake in referrals. People with large cell lymphoma have a great chance at cure. Frontline treatment cures 60% to 70% of patients, and if they relapse, second-line treatment cures about 25% of patients. Historically, patients who don't respond to the second-line treatment have no options, and their 1-year survival rates are somewhere around 10%. Therefore, these patients would not have been referred to major centers, historically; they would have been managed locally and in a palliative manner. However, now we are seeing all of these patients being referred because they believe there is finally an option that can work. Everyone has a good chance. HTTP://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/considerations-for-car-tcell-therapy-in-nhl
marcusl2
19/1/2018
19:16
Pram, I can't help but think that your recollection of what Peter said "but brought back to life a decade... later" applies equally well to OXB as a whole. By that I mean 2008 OXB's major hope of the TroVax TRIST trial gets halted. OXB does the one step forwards, two back then one forwards again shuffle for the next decade. But now, 2018, profitable on a month by month basis? More indications for the Novartis drug which LV is a part of? Possibility (after maybe seeing a star in the east) of JD pulling a rabbit out of the hat with something new too?
harry s truman
19/1/2018
19:05
... or as OXB become better financed, or who's reputation becomes so much better that their assets become better appreciated. (Shame for the potential patients though).
prambigear
19/1/2018
18:10
Marcus, Harry - thank you both for an illuminating discussion. Pram - maybe that will happen as gene therapy becomes increasingly accepted as mainstream. rrr
rrr
19/1/2018
16:17
I agree with both of you from everything I have heard from people in the company. However, I also recall the very experienced director Peter Blake (?) reminding the audience at an AGM that he could list several cases of drugs that had been shelved but brought back to life a decade or more later.
prambigear
19/1/2018
16:11
I'd agree with that too. It's sad because RetinoStat would have been an outpatient injection, but if the business case is not there then they won't do it. Just have to wait and see - never say never, etc. - but it has been a long time now with that since the end of the first trial.
harry s truman
19/1/2018
15:59
Maybe. Was it Peter Nolan who said it would need a company with big pockets to move it forward? I am much more hopeful about the other candidates, particularly Prosavin II.
marcusl2
19/1/2018
15:56
Marcus, I'm pretty sure we've seen something on here regarding the difference in cost between Lucentis and Avastin (extremely similar drug made in the same factory but marketed for a different disease). The bottom line is that Lucentis has paid back development costs many times now, so it's just a case of keeping market share (and the profit at whatever price is needed to keep market share). They can theoretically cut the price so low that more expensive treatments would never pay back. For what it's worth I agree with your last line, but before paying for a P3 I'm sure this would be one of the things that made Sanofi drop it.
harry s truman
19/1/2018
15:36
It`s at I/II trial prep. They stopped spending on the trials but are hoping for licence/ spin out. Retinostat may need reformulated as efficacy was not good enough if I understand it correctly. If I had wet AMD I would be paying for a one-off gene therapy instead of regular eye injections.
marcusl2
19/1/2018
15:32
rrr, If you want my 2 cents, then they'll do nothing with it other than try to sell it as it is. Sanofi had 2 dogs in this fight, which were AAV2-sFLT01 (wholly owned) and RetinoStat (via licence deal with us). It is a while now, but I seem to remember that both were on a par in the early trials and it was expected that Sanofi would take one forwards into a bigger dose / bigger trial. They dropped both. When returning RetinoStat to us for free, they said something nice to the effect that they thought it worked but that the Wet AMD market was going to be saturated, so they weren't going to spend the money. They were happy to take StarGen and UshStat further (very similar drugs as you know) because those needs were unmet and it made much more business sense. OXB have had a long time to spin out RetinoStat. Must be 5 years now since the trial ended? Not a sniff. Sanofi have similar clout to Novartis and the cost of further RetinoStat trials would not have been onerous for them. They considered it and gave it away. I remember a YouTube presentation by OXB (in Japan I think) where they had a slide regarding eye opportunities for our delivery method, the last 5 of which had no competition / unmet need. These were glaucoma, juvenile glaucoma, LCA10, uveitis, retinitis pigmentosa, x-linked retinitis pigmentosa and choroideraemia. Perhaps one of those is more likely as a way forwards - following proof of concept in RetinoStat / UshStat / Stargen. As for your question to Marcus about EncorStat, then that's the one with the government grant I think - so there will be something going on.
harry s truman
19/1/2018
14:56
rrr, I would think so, based on other products. One thing to bear in mind - biosimilars of Lucentis and by that time, also perhaps Eylea, will be available, so that could impact pricing somewhat.
stocktastic
Chat Pages: 4069  4068  4067  4066  4065  4064  4063  4062  4061  4060  4059  4058  Older
Your Recent History
LSE
GKP
Gulf Keyst..
LSE
QPP
Quindell
FTSE
UKX
FTSE 100
LSE
IOF
Iofina
FX
GBPUSD
UK Sterlin..
Stocks you've viewed will appear in this box, letting you easily return to quotes you've seen previously.

Register now to create your own custom streaming stock watchlist.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P:40 V: D:20180122 07:58:39