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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jpmorgan Japanese Investment Trust Plc LSE:JFJ London Ordinary Share GB0001740025 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  10.00 1.69% 602.00 601.00 603.00 603.00 600.00 600.00 519,117 16:35:15
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 0.0 9.4 5.2 115.5 971

Jpmorgan Japanese Invest... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 301 to 325 of 475 messages
Chat Pages: 19  18  17  16  15  14  13  12  11  10  9  8  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
29/7/2007
14:23
hagd: Overall I agree with your comments and observations re Japan in the above post. Maybe short term ragarding the chart above for this Find, the following is my view. I like 'high volume' - be it buys or sells, there have been some million vol days recently quite strong. I dont see the MAcD rising much, but it is widdling along a bit. But it IS diverging upwards compared with the RSI. One of my favourites is the RSI. In this case there are two strong RSI lows in 2006 ( as low as 10!) this year only as low as 20. At the moment the RSI is still slipping down and is 35. - I would tend to buy ( If I do) on a turn up of the RSI, which means I prefer to wait for two rising share days in succession before coming in. OK one misses the 'bottom' but avoids possible further drift ( to 20! or 10!) I'd really intend to hold for 1 -3 years if at all possible. - Looking back it is odd that the Market was so high in early 2006, but all helps to show where is might be in a year. My tareg would be the 270p resistnce of recent times however. Even that is a 50P rise! which is not easy to find now for example even in a good FTSE Mid cap growth stock. regds H.
hectorp
29/7/2007
11:52
On the chart, note that the MACD has been steadily rising as the price has been falling. That's positive divergence. There is also a large falling wedge pattern. Recently, it has seen above average volume. The conclusion of that pattern is normally a sharp upward chart break. All the ingredients are there.......
haveagoodday
29/7/2007
11:43
Hello Hectorp, well done for your migration from NRK! It's cheap principally because of the devaluation of the Yen, and has run to a discount. After the last few days though, as you know, that devaluation has abruptly stopped and reversed. Credit crunch in Japan? Quite the reverse, Japan has been the world's banker and the money is now flowing back as the US and UK have burnt themselves out. China is now the main trading partner, and growing fast. The chart is finding support around this 220 area. When it rises that discount quickly disappears and goes to a premium. (when it falls, the opposite happens). Japan officially has 0% inflation. That is disputable though, as The Yen has devalued, gold has risen, the oil price in USD has risen. 0% - are the figures correct? Regardless, at sometime in the foreseeable future interest rates will rise proportionally by 50%, from 0.5 tp 0.75%, that will no doubt accelerate the Yen's rise. Japan is finally recovering from a 17 year depression and the Treasury is reluctant to stop the sharp growth. GDP is 5.0% and rising. That's the difference between Japan and western economies (US and UK anyway). They are faltering and going into recession, Japan is coming out the other side. It's one big market as you say, but the economies are opposite ends of the financial spectrum. The turmoil in the markets is due to investors swapping sides as they realise what's happening. As far as I'm concerned it's better to be on the side that's going up. When it does, most Japanese funds will follow. Why this one? A large fund £0.5bn, small spread and well managed. Have a look at recent announcements. It has been purchasing a lot of shares for cancellation. That says a lot about where the managers think it's going. rgds ps if you do buy, buy in the afternoon. In the mornings the spread is wide and narrows as the day progresses, so with no change you get in a couple of pence cheaper.
haveagoodday
29/7/2007
10:54
Buy JAPAN Funds. ?? watty could be very right. The rising yen, but will the World not suffer as a whole when the US and Europe suffer eg from the credit crunch? Would Japanese companies be fairly immune? its one big market. Still i can see the advantages. But why is thus TRust at nearly 30p discount to NAV? why has it fallen from January high? If it is so desireable what is the chart telling us about the outlook? It SEEMS cheap. WHat is the P/E of Japan companies, is it lower than the UK average of 13-14%? If someone can give some replies, I may consider buying these Funds. regds H.
hectorp
29/7/2007
08:42
Morning Watty, hope business is going well for you in China. rgds
haveagoodday
29/7/2007
06:17
Hello everyone, i feel sorry for equities bulls in the west. but those who are investing jap equities will have a lot to smile about soon. Jap companies have been accumulating cash for a few years now. But as yen has been suppressed, the companies can afford to good spending on capital expenditure which will no doubt put Jap businesses very good advantages in the long run. Secondly, the strengthening of yen, which i strongly believe is an eventuality, will suddenly strengthen their balance sheet and hence their values. i don't have an expertise to look at individual jap stocks, so i just buy its which are trading at good discounts as well as a tracker fund from hsbc. while jap market looks increasingly interesting, the opposite is happening here in uk, europe and us. in the past few years, very few business pay attention on capital expenditure. instead, increasing dividends on borrowing money has become a norm here. home depot borrowed money for share buyback. tate and lyle, i used to hold, return it sales proceed to investors rather than knocking off debt or other expenditure. in one word, businesses here became too short-sighted in the past few years which alone, let alone credit problems, is a good reason to take extra caution before buying equities here. i hardly know anything about technical analysis, but some of them who knows have been talking positive things about this one. fingers crossed. gl, from mild western china
watwungyi
28/7/2007
15:56
Yen up 10 on the week (240 now) v GBP as carry trade unwinds What the Yen does against the £, the dow follows
haveagoodday
26/7/2007
14:11
Carry trade unwinding? Yen strongly up today at 244
tiraider
25/7/2007
15:17
Watwungyi Yes I should have but even they have gone nowhere eg SF33 which is the one I watch. I hoped/expected JMF and BGFD to do better than a tracker not worse! Big mistake
hosede
24/7/2007
12:19
THE NET ASSET VALUES IN PENCE WITH DEBT VALUED AT PAR AS AT MARKET CLOSE ON 23rd JULY 2007 WERE AS FOLLOWS: JPMORGAN JAPANESE INVESTMENT TRUST PLC: 250.81
tiraider
19/7/2007
23:05
I can see a falling wedge in the chart, MACD has been rising as the price has been falling - postive divergence. Falling wedges are always difficult to call, but worth bearing in mind should JFJ start moving upwards. If confirmed, the rise would be fast. On the other hand I could be completely wrong!! free stock charts from www.advfn.com
haveagoodday
19/7/2007
22:56
Hello Wattie, nice to see you here too. Latest tonight from the US, BS $50 - $100bn losses. There's still $1000bn of cheap mortgage deals ending this autumn / winter / spring. Expect carry trade to be unwound rapidly. lots in FT, http://www.ft.com/markets/capitalmarkets rgds ___________________________________________________________ http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6906914.stm Last Updated: Thursday, 19 July 2007, 19:55 GMT 20:55 UK Fed warns of $100bn credit losses Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke has warned that the crisis in the US sub-prime lending market could cost up to $100bn. In a second day of testimony to Congress, Mr Bernanke said credit losses associated with sub-prime mortgage failures were "significant". Wall Street is nervous about the exposure of banks and other lenders to the riskier sub-prime market. Earlier this month Bear Stearns bailed out two sub-prime focused hedge funds. It has since said one of them has "very little value" and the other is now worthless. Downbeat note Fears that the downturn in the housing market, prompted by more people's inability to pay their mortgages, will cause instability and retrenchment in the wider economy have grown in recent weeks. Mr Bernanke, in two days of testimony before US legislators, has sounded a persistently downbeat note on the state of the housing market and the woes of the sub-prime sector, which have led to the collapse of about 30 lenders. More than a million Americans lost their homes last year Senator Robert Menendez "The credit losses associated with sub-prime have come to light and they are fairly significant," Mr Bernanke told a Senate Committee. "Some estimates are in the order of between $50bn and $100bn of losses." The Fed's handling of the sub-prime market, which it regulates, came under fire from Senators who argued it should have done more to protect vulnerable consumers from inappropriate and improper mortgage practices. "More than a million Americans lost their homes last year," said Senator Robert Menendez. "In my mind, this is not just simply a time for suggestions, it is a time for solutions." Mr Bernanke said the Fed was reviewing current regulations on lending practices in a "responsible" manner. Wider problems? The Fed remained "alert" for any signs that housing weakness may destabilise the economy as a whole, Mr Bernanke added. It has already acknowledged the impact of reduced activity in the housing market on consumer spending, cutting its forecast for economic growth this year. It has also said it expects the unemployment rate to rise from 4.5% to 4.75% by year-end. Despite the impact of the crisis in the sub-prime mortgage market, the US economy has performed better in the second quarter of the year than the first. The economy has continued to create new jobs at a healthy clip while the number of unemployment benefit claimants is now at its lowest since early May. But the Conference Board, publishing its latest economic analysis on Thursday, said that it expected economic growth to slow in the next few months.
haveagoodday
19/7/2007
16:48
JPM bought back another 100,000 JPMorgan Japanese Investment Trust plc has today purchased 100,000 ordinary shares for cancellation at 222.90 pence per share. ______________________________________________________________ solid support building at 221. NAV 249.5 today. With the collapse of the Bear Stearn funds beginning to spread to other markets, and more hedgies going down, the carry trade could be nearer to reversing than we think.
tiraider
18/7/2007
13:01
Sterling has appreciated 25% against the Yen over the last eighteen months from Y200 to Y250 worth 60p or so on the share price It wont always be like that the 'carry trade' will get so out of control something will happen to call the turn. Also company buying in treasury stock in the past their timing has been good.
a0148009
18/7/2007
11:53
Bear Sterns funds "written off" could spark off the carry trade unwinding _____________________________________________________________________ Metals - Gold up as the dollar falls to new all-time low against the euro UPDATE (Updates prices, adds details) LONDON (Thomson Financial) - Gold was up slightly in early trade as the dollar fell to a new all-time low against the euro, though gains were capped by waning interest from physical buyers as prices rose. Gold tends to move in the opposite direction to the dollar, as it as seen as an alternative asset to the most common reserve currency. "The tone has been far more bullish this morning... as the dollar lurched lower following reports of hedge fund losses from Bear Stearns, increasing speculation that investors are losing faith in the greenback," said TheBullionDesk.com analyst James Moore. At 10.45 am, spot gold was trading at 667.60 usd an ounce, compared with 665 usd in late New York trade yesterday. However, gold's gains have been limited by low levels of buying by jewellers in the seasonally quiet summer months, and the high prices putting off bargain hunters. "I don't think gold has been as responsive as it could have been," said Barclays analyst Suki Cooper. "It's a slow period for gold, unlike Q1 when we saw really strong physical demand." Market players are also poised ahead of US Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's semi-annual testimony to Congress, and the release of US core inflation data later today, as they look for clues to the future direction of the dollar. Oil prices have also eased from close to all-time record highs, weighing slightly on bullion. Gold tends to rise in line with oil prices, as it is seen as an inflationary hedge against higher energy costs. However, with the dollar continuing to be placed under pressure, some analysts see gold prices continuing to rise in the short-term. "There's probably still room for a move to the upside - gold prices have a stronger correlation with the dollar than with oil at the moment," said Cooper at Barclays. Among other precious metals, platinum is flat at 1,308 usd, underpinned by news that South African mine workers rejected a pay offer from Northam Platinum, increasing the likelihood of strike action. Its sister metal palladium fell to 361 usd against 366 usd. Silver was edged up to 12.96 usd against 12.93 usd.
tiraider
18/7/2007
09:23
By tracker fund hosede. HSBC Japanese tracker funds are there. But the probelm is weak yen. it needs to get strengthened.
watwungyi
17/7/2007
12:19
Its very frustrating (to put it mildly!)to see the NI225 climbing steadily while JFJ and BGFD which I also hold are going nowhere - got out of FJV as it was even worse. NAVs quoted in Yen would be a useful addition - then at least you could quantify the currency part of the loss
hosede
14/7/2007
13:31
haveagoodday, good to see you here. i am not a veteran investor as you said i appear to claim to be. btw, i almost finished reading the shipley's japanese money tree, a good book from ft which i would recommend anyone interested in investing in japan. the author pointed out interesting sectors to look value in particulars. real estate and technology with strong protection by means of intellectual property rights. Some key events to look out. Japanese investors've been sending their money abraod because of their perception that valued can't be found in the country. so there's a large capital outflow which weakens yen and result in unattractive returns from domestic investment. but that is going to change as japanese economy shows consistent signs of sustained recovery and jap investors will take profit from overseas investment and put their money in domestic investment and that should be good for japanese investment. and next is interest rates rise by BoJ which should be a good thing, first many companies are valued on the assumption of deflation, which means market cap for the companies are less than their NAV. But interest rate hike means their worth should be revalued and boost share price, this should reinforce capital inflow and visciious circle began. so two things we need to look out, capital inflow and interest rate( last week it was 8 1) so there is no certainty in August decision. But it will come soon. two invst trust in particular: jfj and melchoir jap trust, some may opt for fidelity jap values. anyone any interesting investment here. but for me for the next ten years, vietnam(+southeast asia) and japan are good places to invest in Asia pacific, and aus and nz to a lesser extent due to seemingly undiminshing commodity bull market. by the way, i have been making heavy losses betting against dow jones and ftse though i haven't closed my short positions. thursday rally was more of hedge funds desperately trying to cover their shor hedges and that reinforced the gains which follow, unfortunately for me, the following day. I am not panic but apparently nervous. next week there will be lots of inflation data to come out and i don't think we'll see any positve for those expecting rate cut because friday import prices data show they are on the increase. and wsj reported china's disinflation pressure is waning. but of course it's market interpretation which counts. and i am increasingly nervous. fingers crossed and good luck all
watwungyi
11/7/2007
13:02
THE NET ASSET VALUES IN PENCE WITH DEBT VALUED AT PAR AS AT MARKET CLOSE ON 10TH JULY 2007 WERE AS FOLLOWS: JPMORGAN JAPANESE INVESTMENT TRUST PLC: 255.29 Big jump in NAV in 1 day. GP; agree some turmoil ahead (already started). I would rather be invested in Japan than in Europe, UK or US at the moment. Only holding gilts / cash in those areas. Last year has been disappointing. I've had a reasonable run from '01. Doubled my holding in JFJ yesterday. Good luck rgds
tiraider
11/7/2007
09:40
The problem I think is that JFJ has bet on smaller companies catering to the domestic market whereas it is the large exporters benefiting from the lower yen where the action is at the moment. An ageing population is not going to help the domestic market either. An unwinding of the yen carry trade should lift the yen but any benefits from that side of things may well be negated by the potential turmoil a rapid unwinding of that trade would do to world credit markets. I thought the time had come two years ago to invest in Japan but so far that has not been one of my better investment decisions.
greenpastures
10/7/2007
12:17
THE NET ASSET VALUES IN PENCE WITH DEBT VALUED AT PAR AS AT MARKET CLOSE ON 9TH JULY 2007 WERE AS FOLLOWS: JPMORGAN JAPANESE INVESTMENT TRUST PLC: 245.37 I see JFJ was in the market yesterday for 250,00 of it's own shares. Chart seems to be finding good support at 220 level. JFJ must think it's good value at this level.
tiraider
09/7/2007
20:45
Post from NRK thread. The poster appears to be a US trader who claims to be an investment veteran. He likes JFJ anyway.......... watwungyi - 7 Jul'07 - 11:14 - 486 of 492 hello fellas, i was just so bored yesterday and ended up spending a few hours at waterstone. two interesting books in particular caught my attn: tony bolton's new book and japanese money tree. the latter i took home for weekend reading as i decided not to be at sw19 as anna is out. one line that caught me from bolton's book is this: (well i don't remember exacq quote) the purchase price you paid for a stock is immaterial, it's only psychological, if things do not seem to be going well, just snap it instantly. i suddenly remeber those lovely charming people sticking with nrk. :-) so guys this is a useful piece of advice from an investment veteran. second book is very interesting. equites in europe, emerging markets and real estate all look so boringly high. and japs market has been really drawing my interest lately. that book sort of try to explain why we should look at japs. but sadly i don't find what i reall want to find out about japs. it's yen. the declining yen has been eroding my gains in jap truts. and i want to know the likelihood of yen strengthening. sadly couldn't find so far. but if you want to put some money in jap, i think jp morgan japanese trust and melchoir japanese(mlt or mjt) are worth looking. both trading at good discount. long term buy i think. gool luck all, http://www.advfn.com/cmn/fbb/thread.php3?id=9305719&from=472
haveagoodday
08/7/2007
12:29
Japan is hitching a ride with China By Liam Halligan, Sunday Telegraph Last Updated: 12:50am BST 08/07/2007 This Thursday, it's the Bank of Japan's turn to decide if interest rates should rise. But, whatever happens, the world's second-largest economy seems to be sustaining its long, gradual recovery from the stagnation of the 1990s. The closely watched Tankan index of business confidence, published last week, showed a sharp rise in firms' profit forecasts for the rest of the year. In particular, big Japanese exporters are benefiting from the weak yen - now, in real terms, at its lowest for 20 years. In February, Japanese rates rose to 0.5 per cent - the second increase since the infamous zero-rate policy ended in July 2006. And with the economy set to expand by 2.6 per cent this year, rates will soon hit 0.75 per cent. If that doesn't happen this week, Bank of Japan Governor Toshihiko Fukui may signal a rise in August. Japan still has serious problems. The consumer price index just fell marginally - a chilling reminder of the deflationary spiral which once dragged the economy down. But the Land of the Rising Sun should continue its long march back to rude health. That's because China has recently usurped America as Japan's biggest trading partner. So even if the US hits the skids, an ongoing Asian boom will keep Japan on the mend. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtml?xml=/money/2007/07/08/ccliam208.xml
haveagoodday
04/7/2007
21:44
Japan Tankan survey shows robust 2Q business sentiment Monday, July 02, 2007 5:10:46 AM ET newratings.com LONDON, July 2 (newratings.com) – Japanese business sentiment continues to be high, according to data published on Monday in the Bank of Japan's Tankan survey. The Tankan survey showed that the diffusion index of sentiment among large manufacturers stood at 23 in the second quarter, flat at the first quarter's level. The diffusion index for large non-manufacturers was 22, again sequentially flat. The strong reading of the widely watched index did not have a significant impact on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, with the TOPIX index up merely 0.31%, or 5.48 points, at 1,780.36. The Bank of Japan had surveyed 10,839 enterprises of all sizes in the latest survey.
knowing
01/7/2007
23:52
Tokyo shares seen retesting 7-year high as first-half gains may extend TOKYO (Thomson Financial) - The Tokyo stock market is expected to extend its first-half gains into the second half, propelling the benchmark Nikkei 225 index toward 20,000, its highest level in seven years and more than 10 percent above the close on Friday. In a continuation of trends seen in the first half, the industrialization of the so-called BRIC countries -- Brazil, Russia, India and China -- and a firm economic outlook in other parts of the world are expected to encourage investors to buy shares of exporters, while concerns about the strength of domestic demand remain, analysts said. In the first half, Hitachi Zosen, Japan Steel Works and Sumitomo Metal Mining enjoyed the biggest percentage gains among Nikkei components as investors eyed growing demand in the BRIC countries and greater Asia for industrial materials and cargo transportation. Those gains helped power the blue-chip market gauge to a 5.3 pct gain to 18,138.36 on Friday from 17,225.83 on December 29, its last trading day in 2006. Not all stocks took part in the rally. Shinsei Bank, Casio Computer and Sky Perfect JSAT suffered the steepest percentage declines, hit by earnings worries. The Nikkei touched a seven-year closing high of 18,240.30 on June 21, after overcoming the global stock market turmoil triggered by a sharp sell-off in the Chinese market in late February. The steep decline on the Shanghai stock exchange caused the Nikkei to shed its year-to-date gains and sent it to a March 5 closing low of 16,642.25, a full 8.6 pct below the February 26 close of 18,215.35. For the rest of the year, the Nikkei is likely to advance further into territory not seen since mid-2000, as the benefits of a weaker yen are felt, boosting investor confidence in the export-oriented Japanese economy, analysts said. "The market will probably trend higher to a little above or below 20,000 on the Nikkei by the year-end. This is based strictly on the condition that the yen stays near current levels and thereby leads to the upgrading of earnings projections by major exporters," said Hiroyuki Fukunaga, strategist at Rakuten Securities. The dollar has climbed to just below 124 yen in recent sessions, up almost eight yen from its March level with half of the four-month gain coming after Japanese companies had hammered out earnings projections that were based on an outlook for a firmer yen. By sector, producers of steel and other industrial materials, as well as shipping companies and shipbuilders, are expected to remain investor favorites in light of strong demand from BRIC countries and broader Asia. "Steel makers and marine transporters are best placed to benefit from surging demand in such emerging countries as China. Nippon Steel and Mitsui OSK Lines, the leaders of these sectors, are a must to have in portfolios," said one trader at a European asset management firm. Nippon Steel has forecast that its revenues would expand 11 pct to 4.76 trln yen in the current fiscal year. Mitsui OSK has forecast an 8 pct rise in revenues to 1.70 trln yen in the year to March 2008. Shares of carmakers, such as Toyota Motor, may also gain in popularity as the yen weakens, raising hopes that these companies that are heavily dependent on offshore demand may beat the earnings projections made in April and May, analysts said. A weak yen buoys the yen-converted value of earnings received in foreign currencies. Shares of high tech companies, on the other hand, may not enjoy as much investor interest despite their deep ties to demand abroad, as they are faced with stiffer competition from players in not only the US and Europe but also Asia, analysts said. Bridgestone, the world's largest tire maker, on Wednesday lifted its earnings guidance for the year to December, attributing its improved outlook to the weaker-than-expected yen so far this year, as well as surprisingly firm sales in the US. Analysts said Bridgestone's announcement is the first sign of the impact the weak yen is having and bodes well for all the carmakers, the major constituents of the Nikkei index. "There is a possibility that the yen's recent weakness may lift earnings sharply" at carmakers, while their business fundamentals have also improved, thanks partly to the increasing weight of China and other emerging markets, said Shinya Naruse, a car-sector analyst at Nomura Securities. Rising gasoline prices have made fuel-efficient cars popular, and this should also help Japanese carmakers escape much of the impact of softer demand in the US where top Japanese carmakers generate roughly 60 pct of their operating profits, he said. The Nomura analyst on Wednesday lifted his investment recommendation on the auto sector to bullish from neutral, and said car shares are broadly undervalued at current levels. But although most analysts are bullish on the stock market, they caution that political uncertainty may pressure the Nikkei towards 17,500 or slightly lower before the upper house election on July 29. "The election, along with a probable rate hike by the Bank of Japan, is the most significant event when looking at the market's prospects through the year-end," said the trader at the European asset manager. Investors are wary that the vote may sap Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling Liberal Democratic Party and drag on the government's efforts to reform the Japanese economy. Reforms have been a key market driver in recent years. The Nikkei began its advance in October 2005 when the Parliament passed a bill to privatize the postal services, a plan proposed by Abe's predecessor, the reformist prime minister Junichiro Koizumi. At that time, the Nikkei was trading around 13,000. "If a loss by the LDP in the vote removes foreign investors' hopes in Japan's chances to reform, they may unload the holdings built in positive response to the passing of the postal services reform bill. That would be a major pressure on the market," Rakuten's Fukunaga said. The lack of a steady recovery in consumer demand may continue to be a source of concerns for investors as it has been for the Bank of Japan which aims to "normalize" its super low interest rates. Even so, investors expect the central bank to raise its overnight call rate target by 25 basis points to 0.75 pct after the election, most likely in August. "Share prices have factored in the possibility of one rate hike this year, while uncertainties remain on chances of a second move," said Tsuyoshi Segawa, strategist at Shinko Securities. Investors will monitor closely the effects of one or two rate hikes on the economy and on the yen, analysts said. The best timing to launch into buying will be around September if a possible August rate hike fails to spark the active unwinding of yen carry trades, which would cause the yen to strengthen again. "An upgrading of earnings projections by carmakers and other exporters in or around September will trigger the buying spree which I expect to send the Nikkei rising towards its highs for the year," Rakuten's Fukunaga said. (1 usd = 123.21 yen)
knowing
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