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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Jpmorgan Japanese Investment Trust Plc LSE:JFJ London Ordinary Share GB0001740025 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  10.00 1.69% 602.00 601.00 603.00 603.00 600.00 600.00 519,117 16:35:15
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 0.0 9.4 5.2 115.5 971

Jpmorgan Japanese Invest... Share Discussion Threads

Showing 326 to 350 of 475 messages
Chat Pages: 19  18  17  16  15  14  13  12  11  10  9  8  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
27/9/2007
21:24
Hi Wattie, not too late! rgds
haveagoodday
27/9/2007
21:18
I should have added some at #2.
watwungyi
27/9/2007
14:26
Looks like it may have at last broken out of that falling wedge. Whatever, it has formed a bullish inverse h & s.
tiraider
27/9/2007
14:23
Thanks haveagoodday.
greenpastures
26/9/2007
07:44
Last Updated: Wednesday, 26 September 2007, 06:05 GMT 07:05 UK Japan sees jump in trade surplus Japan's trade surplus hit a 24-year high in August, with surging exports to other Asian nations and Europe offsetting slower sales to the US. The monthly surplus grew 288% from a year earlier to 743bn yen ($6.47bn; £3.2bn), led by rising car exports. While exports to other Asian countries soared 16.4% and to Europe by 15.6%, those to the US rose by just 4.6%. The weak US figure is being seen as a further sign that the American economy is slowing. 'Offsetting US dip' The trade surplus recorded in August, as reported by the Ministry of Finance, was ahead of market expectations. Analysts said the big increase in exports across Asia and to Europe, would ease fears that the apparent economic slowdown in the US could hit Japan's economy. Japan's overall exports rose 14.5% in August with car exports up by 22%, while imports grew by 5.7%. "Asian economies will likely continue to grow strongly and Japanese exports to this region will continue to rise," said Mamoru Yamazaki, chief economist for RBS Securities Japan in Tokyo. "That should offset the expected slowdown in the US economy and US demand." http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7013621.stm
haveagoodday
19/9/2007
16:06
Thanks for posting the above. I also read comments from other pundits and analysts that Japan will be the place to be invested in over the next few years. Perhaps I need to review my pessimistic stance.
greenpastures
19/9/2007
09:20
Japan year to July average commercial land price rises for 1st time in 16 years TOKYO (Thomson Financial) - The average price of commercial land in Japan rose 1.0 percent in the year to July 1, its first rise in 16 years and the strongest evidence yet that the world's second-largest economy is gradually escaping from years of deflation, the Land Ministry said Wednesday. According to the results of a survey conducted by the ministry, the average price of residential land in Japan slipped 0.7 percent during the period, falling for the 16th year, although the fall was smaller than the 2.3 percent decline a year earlier. The ministry's annual survey examines the prices of 24,374 properties based on appraisals by real estate valuers, every July 1. In the metropolitan areas of Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya, average prices of both residential and commercial land increased for the second straight year. The average price of residential land rose 4.0 percent and the average price of commercial land increased 10.4 percent, the largest increase since 1990, when it rose 16.6 percent. Amid Japan's economic recovery, the rising trend of land prices in each metropolitan area continued to be supported by brisk demand for condominium units and offices as well as by a recovery in corporate profits. The uptrend in prices also spread to the surrounding areas. In metropolitan Tokyo, the average price of residential land increased 4.8 percent, rising for the second consecutive year. The average price of commercial land increased 12.1 percent, also rising for the second straight year and posting its biggest increase since 1988, when it rose 15.8 percent. In Tokyo's 23 central wards, the average price of residential land was up 13.1 percent from the previous year and the average price of commercial land was up 20 percent. In metropolitan Osaka, the average price of residential land rose 2.9 percent after being flat the year before. It was the first rise in 17 years. The average price of commercial land climbed 8.0 percent, rising for the second straight year. In metropolitan Nagoya, the average price of residential land price grew 2.4 percent, the first rise in 16 years, while the average price of commercial land rose 7.2 percent, up for the second straight year. But economists doubt there would be a repeat of the asset price bubble of the 1990s that later burst, leaving Japanese banks with saddled with huge debts. The annual survey showed that the downtrend in land prices in most of the rural areas remained. The average price of residential land in rural areas fell 2.3 percent, down for the 15th straight year, while the average price of commercial land dropped 2.6 percent, down for the 16th year. But in both cases, the declines were smaller than previously. "The mini-bubble in the major cities appears to be nearing its end due as massive redevelopment projects appear to have peaked," Societe Generale Asset Management senior economist Akio Yoshino said. "Because of lessons from past experience, Japanese financial institutions continue to show a conservative stance in extending loans related to asset investments, while investors have become more reasonable in weighing risks and returns, shifting funds quickly to other investment assets such as stocks, when the returns on asset-related products such as real estate investment trusts fall," said Daiwa Institute of Research senior economist Junichi Makino. "So, it is fair to think that land prices will continue to be reasonably priced going forward," he said. A much-awaited rebound in land prices appears to support the Bank of Japan's case for increasing interest rates from their present low levels, but economists are cautious about reading too much into the latest figures. "When signs begin to emerge that the rise in land prices may be moderating even in the major cities, the Bank of Japan could misjudge its policy call if it pegs monetary policy solely on land prices," Yoshino said. BoJ governor Toshihiko Fukui has said he is not worried about the possibility of another asset bubble. He said that while rising land prices in major cities such as Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya look "somewhat rapid, they have not deviated notably" from fair value levels based on a discounted cash flow method. "It is difficult for us to base our monetary policy just on land prices or the foreign exchange market, but we will bear in mind these developments and make appropriate policy judgements," Fukui said.
tiraider
12/9/2007
13:26
GP I'm holding onto my position, the strengthening yen is mitigating the losses, the USD is falling and taking the £ with it. The N225 is my only exposure to equities so it's a bit of a hedged risk. The Japanese numbers are a bit erratic so not too reliable. The Japanese economy is growing quickly whereas the US is falling. I think it's a much safer bet than the US and UK for now.
tiraider
12/9/2007
13:16
Thanks for posting that tiraider. I am coming round to the position that it is probably best to forget about Japan as far as investing is concerned. An ageing population is not going to help matters.
greenpastures
11/9/2007
17:37
From Times Online September 10, 2007 Tempus comment: Sinking sun Japanese stocks took a beating as investors flinched at the announcement of a negative quarter of real economic growthLeo Lewis in Tokyo Although yesterday's contraction represents an unexpected end to Japan's longest period of postwar growth, some economists were quick to dismiss its importance. The numbers are notoriously volatile during the April-to-June quarter, and many analysts continue to forecast good things for Japan's big manufacturers. But there were definite warning signs both in yesterday's figures and in the recent clutch of consumer and business sentiment reports. The worry for Japan is now twofold. A US slowdown undoubtedly will hurt Japan's exporters, but nobody is sure how bad the sub-prime lending fiasco has been, so the extent of the impact on Japan is also opaque. But more unsettling for economists is the prospect that the "virtuous circle" of rising wages and rising consumer spending - the transmission mechanism that powers 50 per cent of the Japanese economy - will not kick-start as soon as hoped. Many growth forecasts for Japan depend on that mechanism roaring into life in the coming fiscal year, and any blow to that scenario could leave the outlook bleak. http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/economics/article2424795.ece
tiraider
09/9/2007
15:06
last week, i went for a walking tour arranged by british library which is making a sort of awareness campaign about enviroment. there i met a student from japan studying at soas. and out of curiosity, i asked if she would go back to jap for job or find one here. she said she's already got a job from japan and said employment prospect are getting better and better. baby-boomers are retiring and the surging of jap's economy means japs are entering a new phase. secondly, japs are gradually changing their tight immigration policy and the declining population will eventually force them to accept more naturalization, not only talented brazillian footballers. so prospect seems ok for jap's future. recent data though are weak and crisis in western markets have dragged the share price. but prospects are good for long termers.
watwungyi
23/8/2007
13:48
looks like the market is regaining its confidence and so much for me thinking the carry trade was coming to its end. Doesn't appear to be happening just yet.
greenpastures
19/8/2007
12:15
I sold out the week before last. I am watching the situation at the moment. I do wonder what impact the financial turmoil will have on the real economy. A cut in US consumption will have its impact I think on Asian economies even if they have become more sustaining over the last few years. Plus the ending of the carry trade which is now probably in sight will be also hit Japanese exporters too. Going long on the yen is probably a good bet but don't take my word for it. I am not a currency expert nor a financial adviser. It is only an opinion.
greenpastures
15/8/2007
15:03
I sold the Fund a couple of weeks ago and now I am fortunatly out of it but look to return soon. The chart ONCE it rallies has a great deal of upside to cover. We also need Japan's new main export partner China to be strong in the coming months. I suppose too the falling off in carry trade is good for yen. That should give an extra boost to the Fund's returns in due course.
hectorp
11/8/2007
13:24
Low-yield yen proves winner By Peter Garnham Published: August 10 2007 11:57 | Last updated: August 10 2007 22:34 The yen was the big winner in the currency markets this week as the continuing fallout from problems in the credit markets saw investors rush to take risk off the table. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/72faaa42-4730-11dc-9096-0000779fd2ac.html
haveagoodday
06/8/2007
22:47
IMF ups its 2007 growth forecast for Japan to 2.6 pct from 2.3 pct earlier WASHINGTON (Thomson Financial) - Japan's economy is expected to grow faster than earlier thought both this year and next, the International Monetary Fund said today. The IMF now projects Japan's economy will grow at 2.6 pct annual rate this year, faster than the 2.3 pct projected in April. Japanese GDP is expected to hit 2.0 pct in 2008, a tick higher than the 1.9 pct rate predicted in April. The higher growth projections stem from stronger-than-expected first quarter for Japan this year, said Daniel Citrin, IMF deputy director and mission chief for Japan. The IMF report, released after consultations with Japanese officials in May, said Japan's economic expansion has entered into its sixth year, and that Japan's banking system continues to improve, corporate profits are up, and inflation has been kept down. "The outlook remains favorable, with growth increasingly driven by domestic demand," the IMF said. "The risks are evenly balanced with downside risks mainly from the external side, while a tightening labor market could feed into faster consumption." In the medium term, the IMF predicted economic growth in Japan to dip below 2.0 pct starting after 2009. The report said the largest downside risks for Japan are an "unanticipated slowdown" in the US, volatile energy prices, and "global financial turbulence." But it also saw potential upsides for Japan, including faster growth in wages and consumption, and the possibility that the weak yen could drive exports past expectations. The fund said Japan's currency is undervalued, though it did characterize the yen as "market-determined." US automakers have alleged Japan has manipulated its currency to boost Japanese exports but both Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke have publicly said they have seen no evidence of manipulation. "The yen remains below its long-term equilibrium value in real effective terms," the report said. The IMF added that the yen is at its weakest point in two decades after falling by more than 5 pct against the dollar last year. Elsewhere, the IMF said Japan's public debt ratio is "uncomfortably high," and continues to rise. It said Japan needs to continue developing capital markets, raising bank profitability, and opening and deregulating the market. pete.kasperowicz@thomson.com pik/cbd/wash
knowing
05/8/2007
22:02
05/08/2007 Time : 08:08 Source : TFN Asia Nippon Yusen Kabushi Japanese listed companies' Q1 pretax profits jump by 19.5 percent - report TOKYO (Thomson Financial) - The combined pretax profits of Japan's listed companies were 19.5 percent higher in the fiscal first quarter ended June than a year before, the rise having been fueled by booming demand in emerging economies and the weak yen, the Nikkei newspaper reported at the weekend. The newspaper, in a report carried on its website, said The Nikkei Inc had conducted a survey of 914 listed companies that had released their earnings for the quarter. These account for about 60 percent of the publicly traded companies that close their books in March, excluding financial institutions and those listed on the markets for start-ups. Of the 32 industries covered in the survey, 22 posted profit growth. Sectors benefiting from the strong economies in emerging countries saw particularly large gains. Increased demand for shipping natural resources helped Nippon Yusen KK almost double its pretax profit. Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd saw its profit soar by 80 percent. Komatsu Ltd posted a 50 percent profit surge, owing to expansion of its operations in emerging countries. Mitsui & Co's profit tripled on higher prices for energy and natural resources, which were fueled by robust demand from emerging economies. The yen's depreciation continued to boost earnings in many industries. The currency was traded at 123 yen to the US dollar at the end of June, a significant weakening from 118 yen at the end of March. The foreign exchange rate contributed to brisk results at car makers, with Toyota Motor Corp's pretax profit growing by 30 percent. Auto makers' strong earnings also benefited Nippon Steel Corp and other major steel makers. Listed companies are forecast to post their highest-ever combined profits in the fiscal year ending March 2008 for the fifth straight year. However, the outlook for the U.S. economy and foreign exchange rates remain risk factors, the Nikkei said.
haveagoodday
01/8/2007
10:54
I am wondering whether this is the beginning of a world wide financial crash. So much of the world's economy seems to be based on westerners borrowing money to buy from China and other cheap manufacturers. I can't see how that continue indefinitely. And once it stops the whole pyramid could quickly crumble. I hope I am wrong but that is what keeps me awake at night.
greenpastures
01/8/2007
10:12
YEN rises , carry trade hurt... (this should be good for our Fund though tis down over 1%, but Dow is down 2%) We will get a cheaper price yet... http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aFoooPP685hE&refer=home
hectorp
31/7/2007
08:53
NIKKI up, Dow up over 100 pts. But we need the Nikkei to start to act on its own. It need not always be following the US, which is at a different part of the Cycle. at some point it has to rally onwards.
hectorp
30/7/2007
16:28
THE NET ASSET VALUES IN PENCE WITH DEBT VALUED AT PAR AS AT MARKET CLOSE ON 27TH JULY 2007 WERE AS FOLLOWS: JPMORGAN JAPANESE INVESTMENT TRUST PLC: 247.98
tiraider
30/7/2007
09:46
I may be wise then to see how the Japan markets react on Monday next. H.
hectorp
29/7/2007
21:45
From the Telegraph this evening: "An early prediction suggested that the ruling coalition of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and the Buddhist-backed New Komeito had won only 47 of the 121 seats being contested, well below the 64 needed to maintain their hold on the 242-seat House of Councillors. The main opposition group, the Democratic Party of Japan (DJP), was forecast to have taken 59 seats. If confirmed, those figures would be dire for the government. Mr Abe, who took over from the flamboyant Junichiro Koizumi only ten months ago, said he accepted responsibility for an "extremely disappointing" result." Full article: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/07/29/wjapan229.xml
ilancas
29/7/2007
17:20
Nikkei sinks to three-month low By David Turner in Tokyo Published: July 27 2007 03:57 | Last updated: July 27 2007 10:28 Japan's Nikkei share index plunged to a three-month low on Friday as investors brushed aside generally strong earnings results, concentrating instead on the sharp slide overnight in US and European markets. The Nikkei 225 plummeted 2.4 per cent to 17,283.81 while the broader Topix sank 2.2 per cent to 1,699.71. The overnight slide in global markets included a 3.2 per cent plunge in London's FTSE index, the most severe fall in four years. Many of the sharpest falls were in the export sector, because of fears about the global economy. The behaviour of the Japanese stock market was exemplified by Canon, which draws most of its earnings from abroad. Despite a 19 per cent rise in net profit to a record high for the six months to June, the company's shares plunged 5.5 per cent to Y6,510. Toyota, the world's biggest carmaker and one of Japan's largest exporters, was down 1.6 per cent at Y7,260. Shipping, one of the most export-focused sectors of all, dived 2.6 per cent. Mitsui OSK Lines, one of Japan's biggest shippers, dropped 2.7 per cent to Y1,782. But domestic stocks also fell on fears the ruling Liberal Democratic-led coalition may lose control of the Upper House after Sunday's elections, resulting in political turmoil. The banking sector dropped 2.2 per cent, with Mitsubishi UFJ, the world's largest bank by assets, sinking 3 per cent to Y1,290,000. Despite the day's losses, Koji Yamamoto, president of State Street Global Advisors Japan, said foreign institutional investors remained interested in Japan because of "long-term factors". These included improvement in corporate governance, government reforms, and the continuing economic recovery. Shoji Hirakawa, equity strategist at UBS in Tokyo, blamed worries about the US subprime market, as well as election-related concerns, for the fall in Japanese stocks. But he said if the coalition led by Liberal Democratic party lost its majority only narrowly, share prices were set to rise on expectations the LDP would shelve plans within the next few years to raise consumption tax. This would boost household spending, increasing corporate earnings. Weak consumption has helped keep Japan mired in deflation, albeit very mild. Official figures on Friday showed that core consumer prices fell 0.1 per cent on the year in July, as expected. Financial markets think the Bank of Japan is likely to raise interest rates next month regardless of Japan's failure to shake off deflation. But if the ruling coalition lost by a wide margin, share prices would fall on fears "there might be a little bit of a problem passing bills". Many analysts think the coalition will lose its majority, though they disagree on the likely extent of the rout. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/b6d6e3b8-3be9-11dc-8002-0000779fd2ac.html
tiraider
29/7/2007
16:40
i think recent panic in the us and european market means investors need to be a bit more imaginative, sophisticated and perhaps more co-operative. and in this climate my intuition is to look for out-of-favour stocks, sectors or regions. one justification is these out-of-favour stocks usually have sane valuation, free from liquidity or takeover premium. in this regard, japan fits well and also if you are a sort of get-rich-slowly, then maybe you might want to look at merill lynch new energy technology. i still believe commodities have a lot to run, recent hikes in commodity prices made me nervous to make a commitment in miners and commodity stocks, except by buying a few shares monthly. but another sector which has been out of favour and drew my attention recently is biotech sectors. they have been so popular in the early eighties but then they were dismissed almost altogether after technology bust. biotech firms have a very good future not only because new therapies will invariably come from genetic studies but also in non-medicinal agricultural sector, new methods for highly-productive agricultural products(the demand of which will keep rising with rising population and rising energy needs) will originate from genetic studies. And these bio-tech firms are also intersting to me. I found one it (finsbury emerging bio-tech trust) which is run by experts in micro-biology with cfas. any ideas?
watwungyi
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