Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Falanx Group LSE:FLX London Ordinary Share VGG3338A1075 ORD NPV (DI)
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.125p +1.72% 7.375p 7.25p 7.50p 7.375p 7.25p 7.25p 812,147 10:16:35
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Support Services 2.7 -1.7 -1.5 - 11.60

Falanx Share Discussion Threads

Showing 4251 to 4273 of 4275 messages
Chat Pages: 171  170  169  168  167  166  165  164  163  162  161  160  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
18/10/2017
23:56
Unfortunately you could have said the same last year and probably did. The big driver to propel Flx into the big time was the disruptive Midgard. In the next few months we will see if Midgard lives up to the management rhetoric, so far they seem to have been able to keep the disruptive part of Midgard a secret. Contracts are what count now the time for talk is over
nearlythere
18/10/2017
13:27
Let's look at the attractions of Falanx I WILL KEEP IT SIMPLE....Low market cap. Growing Fast.Recurring revenues.Very high margin.Sector worth billions and growing.Massive growth potential............Debit Free0n the verge of profitability...
kaka47
17/10/2017
21:57
So good I had to post it 4 times?!??! 😂
dennisbergkamp
17/10/2017
20:50
htTps://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/iran-attacks-9-000-email-accounts-in-parliament-w5mr836cg Go FLX
onjohn
17/10/2017
20:50
hTtps://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/iran-attacks-9-000-email-accounts-in-parliament-w5mr836cg
onjohn
17/10/2017
20:50
hTtps://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/iran-attacks-9-000-email-accounts-in-parliament-w5mr836cg
onjohn
17/10/2017
20:50
hTtps://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/iran-attacks-9-000-email-accounts-in-parliament-w5mr836cg
onjohn
16/10/2017
17:22
Bought some more today. Holding is now 250,000 hoping for some good price action next year
john09
16/10/2017
17:17
I do not expect anything until the midterms unless a very large contract is signed which changes the financial situation
nearlythere
16/10/2017
17:10
Last update 5th Sept so doubt there's an update coming. I imagine they might issue some update on the progress of MidGard after a couple of months. Hoping for something promising from education sector through Stone, as that sector seems primed for something to progress quite urgently, while also not having a large pot of money to throw at the problem.
yump
16/10/2017
15:48
Looks like nervous PIs ahead of trading update. Or punters who got sucked in recently selling...
smith76
16/10/2017
10:33
I've no idea what's really behind the product, but I reckon lots of smallish companies would go for a cheapish option. High grade IT can be seriously expensive, and lots of companies will be trying to keep a tight budget.We will just have to wait and see.
martinc
16/10/2017
10:28
Smaller companies offer flexibility and speed of change. They are more dynamic than their bigger competitors. So if the product is good enough (not necessarily unique enough)then I don't see why it wouldn't work when there is an effective, well experienced management structure in place. FLX seems to have a good management setup with individuals with experience, reputation and contacts. As they are already in governmental plays, then this also bodes well in getting other government contracts. I'm happy to wait. D
dennisbergkamp
16/10/2017
10:17
Yump I was expecting that kaka47 and the others would provide links to how flx approach is different from the rest, unfortunately it seems, from the last paragraph of kaka47 post, that the flx approach (while packaged differently) has been out there for some time and flx may imo be late to the party. If other big companies have been supplying" Intelligent automated systems" then the amount of information they may have already collected will be huge. I had hoped that Flx while maybe not being disruptive would have something additional or different to add, from Kaka47 post it seems price may be main advantage of midgard. Then the issue imo is. What company big or small will take the risk of using a small fledgling company to save a few pounds when they can get a more mature and better tested protection from the larger firms with vastly superior resources. Considering the size of the possible fines for breaches, it will look a lot better to have been using a big name company rather than the cheaper alternative.
nearlythere
16/10/2017
08:52
You'll know when I sell because the price will move.
yump
16/10/2017
07:44
Well it worked yump sold few weeks ago
hamidahamida
16/10/2017
07:15
Probably best to stop spamming the stock you're interested in yourself.
yump
15/10/2017
12:42
Is someone suggesting that there may be hacking going on, I sure that is news to the people on this bb. It is easy to see that there is no actual news related to Falanx when this is the best the rampers can do and just In case we are all so stupid to click or cut and paste a link he includings the text. Although this bit seems to confirm my view. "Intelligent automated systems can now replicate the work of high-level security professionals, analysing networks, systems and devices with the speed and effectiveness of expert security teams. This technology is putting the defenders on a level playing field with the increasingly automated attackers and can enable organisations of all sizes to compete with the next generation of cyber-attacks." Looks like there may be rather a lot of Midgard type offering out there so it seems Midgard is neither the first or the only.
nearlythere
15/10/2017
12:27
Do you mean to emphasise that there's a lot of hacking risks about ? I'm a little unclear.
yump
15/10/2017
07:50
The Rise Of The Machines In Cyber Security Nicola Whiting Chief Operating Officer at Titania and one of SC Magazine's 20 most influential women in Cyber SecurityNicola Whiting, Chief Operating Officer, Titania explains why organisations are turning to automated cyber security to win the fight against cyber-criminals and state-sponsored hackersAnyone searching Google for 'automated hacking tools' is immediately offered an array of sites where they can quickly download highly disruptive tools. Many come with user ratings, operator guides and money-back guarantees. They are available to rent, buy, rework or franchise. They appear almost legitimate.Yet for those hungry for hacking tools, this is just the start. Navigate onto the dark web and you'll find yourself winding through the digital underworld of cyberspace's most notorious black market, a Mos Eisley for cyber weapons vendors, creating a booming cyber arms marketplace outside the parameters of the law. Weapons of choice for hackers here tend to be those that dramatically simplify and multiply sophisticated cyber-attacks. These range from automated distributed denial of service (DDoS) 'Stressor' tools, which overload networks with reams of data, to dictionary attack tools that generate endless password combinations in a bid to break into private devices.The increase in availability of automated hacking technologies coincides with a rise in the magnitude of online attacks. In 2015, Symantec found more than 430 million unique pieces of malware, that's a 36 percent increase on the year before. Last year, the Dyn attack saw 100,000 IoT devices hijacked and used as platforms for launching the largest recorded cyber-attack of its kind. Earlier this year, the WannaCry ransomware attack infected more than 300,000 computers, hitting dozens of healthcare organisations in the US and bringing down multiple trusts within the UK's National Health Service.Easily available, automated hacking tools are allowing amateurs to carry out sophisticated cyber-attacks and swelling the armies of hacktivists and cyber criminals. However, the resources needed to defend and mend cyber security vulnerabilities, aren't keeping up. The largest ever survey of the global cyber security workforce predicts a shortfall of 1.8 million cyber security workers by 2022. This isn't just a problem for the future, Indeed, the world's number one jobs site, reports that employer demand for cyber security roles is three times higher than candidate interest. Security experts are expensive to hire, costly to train and at risk of getting headhunted - often just when they've got to grips with your system!As automated hacking tools make attacks more likely and the cyber skills gap weakens our traditional defences, we need to find smarter ways to protect ourselves from the rising threat. This is something that larger businesses and military organisations are already addressing. These organisations are on the frontline of the cyber war, facing thousands of attacks every day. To give some perspective, towards the end of 2016, the U.S. Air Force, whose network consists of more than 1 million airborne and ground-based networked computer systems, estimated there were more than 1 million cyber attacks on its network on a daily basis.In order to contend with the scale of such a rising threat, organisations such as the U.S. Air Force, the FBI, Deloitte, PayPal and KPMG have been amongst the first to implement 'intelligent' cyber technologies within their organisations to ensure their networks and computer systems are fortified against the most vicious cyber-attacks thrown at them.Large organisations and the military are not the only ones targeted by machine-aided hackers. In the UK alone, small to medium sized businesses were subject to an average of 230,000 cyber-attacks each across 2016. The rise of automated cyber-attacks means that every organisation with a connection to the internet is under threat. Therefore, the adoption of automated cyber security technologies, machines fighting machines, is vital.The cyber security skills gap means we don't have the people to constantly reinforce cyber defences. Instead, we can use machines to conduct rapid, detailed and accurate audits. This enables organisations to free their cyber security teams from firefighting and engage them in strategy, implementation and active defence. How do we know that automated tools can save time, money and resources? The real proof is in the application. The WannaCry ransomware attack in May led to operations being cancelled in 48 NHS trusts across the UK. Yet those parts of the NHS using intelligent autonomous cyber security 'audits' to find system risks were largely unaffected. The autonomously gathered intelligence, used alongside other tools, ensured preventative measures were in place to successfully protect themselves. Finding the right combination of automation tools, in an industry famed for its "smoke and mirrors", can be its own challenge - but it's one worth pursuing.Intelligent automated systems can now replicate the work of high-level security professionals, analysing networks, systems and devices with the speed and effectiveness of expert security teams. This technology is putting the defenders on a level playing field with the increasingly automated attackers and can enable organisations of all sizes to compete with the next generation of cyber-attacks.http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/nicola-whiting/the-rise-of-the-machines-_b_18235366.html
kaka47
13/10/2017
17:03
You never stopped being a spiteful cow.
j777j
13/10/2017
15:11
Oh dear that's 4. I thought you said you'd given up and gone back to metal-detecting.
yump
13/10/2017
12:08
Nice summary JK. Thanks
dennisbergkamp
Chat Pages: 171  170  169  168  167  166  165  164  163  162  161  160  Older
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