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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Cambium Global Timberland Limited LSE:TREE London Ordinary Share JE00B1NNWQ21 ORD NPV
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 6.25 6.00 6.50 6.25 6.25 6.25 3,610 08:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Forestry & Paper 0.0 -0.2 -1.1 - 5

Cambium Global Timberland Share Discussion Threads

Showing 2726 to 2747 of 2925 messages
Chat Pages: 117  116  115  114  113  112  111  110  109  108  107  106  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
20/2/2011
17:25
topvest - I sold out last year, luckily before the drop below 70p. I agree with your reasons for buying: this sort of thing really ought to be doing well in this climate, but the managers don't seem to get any traction out of the assets. Is it early days? At least the spread isn't savage, so it's not difficult to exit if need be. However, I'm still bemused by the loss of NAV and payment of a so-called dividend - notice that the distributable reserve is bigger than the net assets, so I imagine they could continue this policy for a long time. This reminds me of a company called Ceres Agriculture [CROP] which was a pretty dismal investment when it should have been minting money from soft commodities. It just about kept level, with costs equalling profits until it delisted and liquidated last year.
jonwig
19/2/2011
18:12
Well I've bought some of these. Encouraged by buying in the low 60's when Scottish American Investment Trust paid 100p a few years ago. Should be a good hedge against inflation at this level with a fair amount of upside, provided things start going well at last. 5% yield as well.
topvest
29/1/2011
16:30
Save our forests: Please sign the petition now. http://www.38degrees.org.uk/page/s/save-our-forests#petition For a party that is supposed to pride itself on preserving the UK's heritage, the Conservatives are behaving oddly. Against growing outrage and opposition, (Which they are attempting to bulldoze over), they have just announced details of plans for the £140m to £250m sale of our forests and woodlands. A tiny amount when balanced against the National Debt, so why is one of the UK's few remaining precious assets being flogged off? The forests going up for sale are the same forests that inspired our greatest poetry, writing by Wordsworth, Tennyson, Clare. Novels by Hardy. The forests where our ancestors fought for the right to common land, open to everyone, not just the Eton-educated wealthy. The forests where anyone could enjoy the tranquillity of nature. Once a little time has past does anyone really imagine companies will pay out for Forrest's and Woodlands and leave much of the valuable timber standing? Save our forests: Please sign the petition now. http://www.38degrees.org.uk/page/s/save-our-forests#petition
tradermanic1
20/1/2011
08:22
http://www.sharecast.com/cgi-bin/sharecast/story.cgi?story_id=3983070 Cambium Global Timberland lost a "disappointing" £6.1m before tax in the six months ended 31 October compared with a £961,000 profit in 2009 on revenue up to £770,000 from £570,000. The firm, which has a global portfolio of timberland properties, reported a drop in fair value of investment property and plantations of £2.54m and a net foreign exchange loss of £223,000 versus a £3m profit last time.
tenapen
14/11/2010
08:14
chuckle treest u r well ps have you talked to pc lately?
waldron
04/11/2010
16:36
or i've got you twigged
ariane
04/11/2010
16:25
i'am twiggled pink
ariane
04/11/2010
13:59
tree bien very good
wild bill
03/11/2010
14:37
Don't just eat your greens – eat your trees! 3 November 2010 By admin Leave a Comment School children across the UK are set to plant free packs of edible trees this autumn thanks to the Woodland Trust and Sainsbury's Active Kids. 10,000 "edible hedge & copse" packs are being distributed across the country, which will see 300,000 children plant native trees in their school grounds and community spaces. As part of the Woodland Trust's "More Trees, More Good" campaign, which aims to facilitate the planting of 20 million native trees every year for the next 50 years, 10,000 schools and community groups will be receiving free packs of 30 trees to plant. All of which, when mature will not only provide shelter and habitats, but also edible nuts and fruit. The packs contain dog rose, elder, cherry plum, hazel, crab apple and blackthorn saplings. Sainsbury's raises money for the Woodland Trust through its range of Woodland free range eggs and chicken – with 1p per dozen eggs and 2p per chicken going to the charity. On top of this Sainsbury's has planted over 400,000 trees on its Woodland farms, leading to happier, healthier hens. Schools can apply now for a FREE pack to be delivered in spring 2011, register online at www.MoreTreesMoreGood.org.uk/schools
ariane
30/9/2010
13:43
Hi Jambo - yes, I'm quite pleased with the progress here - there may be a further report on 04/10 at the AGM. The fact that they exited at close to AV suggests timber stuff is viewed positively long-term in US, notwithstanding the current housing market. Is a forest a bit like a mine, except that it grows and takes a bit more TLC?
jonwig
30/9/2010
08:38
Excellent announcement re disposal of US assets at close to asset value. US housing looks grim so good to get out of US timber. Now concentrating on emerging markets.
jambo172
15/9/2010
12:48
why? i've just Logged on take care, you're a cut above the rest.
waldron
15/9/2010
11:18
we'd better "log off" then
wild bill
12/9/2010
16:44
Logging spells danger for Europe's last primeval forest 12 September 2010, 13:11 CET - filed under: Poland, environment, nature, Belarus, FEATURE (BIALOWIEZA) - Deep in the forest, along a dirt road off-limits to tourists, the trunks of centuries-old fir trees lie waiting to be hauled to a sawmill -- felled giants from Europe's last primeval forest. Further in, old oak and ash trunks wait to be turned into planks, furniture or matchsticks: proof, say ecologists, of illicit logging that is endangering the ancient Bialowieza forest in eastern Poland. "Some of the trees have been cut down illegally by Poland's National Forests service, in violation of European Union legislation," contends Polish environmentalist Adam Bohdan, who with other campaigners has raised the alarm in Warsaw and Brussels. State forestry officials deny any logging for commercial purposes in Bialowieza, saying only diseased or infested trees are being felled in the vast woodland area which is home to wild bison, lynx and wolves. "We are also ecologists," says Andrzej Antczak, head of the Bialowieza forest service. "We log only to protect the forest from bark beetles -- insects that pose a grave danger to trees. We want to help nature defend itself and we do it according to Polish legislation," he insists. Last year, forest authorities allowed the logging of some 100,000 cubic metres (3.5 million cubic feet) of wood in Bialowieza, or 0.35 percent of all timber produced in the country. But ecologists are unconvinced. Last month, they filed a complaint with the European Commission against Poland for alleged non-conformity with EU environmental rules. Days later, Greenpeace held a love-in for Bialowieza, hoisting a banner with an enormous heart reading "I love puszcza" (I love the forest) across the facade of the environment ministry in Warsaw. The move paved the way to an agreement with the ministry to halt logging in Bialowieza until the end of last month. Sprawling across 150,000 hectares, the Bialowieza forest reaches across the Polish border with Belarus, where it is entirely protected as a nature park. Named a World Heritage site in 1979, it is home to 20,000 animal species, including 250 types of bird and 62 species of mammals -- among them Europe's largest, the bison. Europe's tallest trees, firs towering 50 metres high (164 feet), and oaks and ashes of 40 metres, also flourish here, in an ecosystem untouched by human hand for more than 10 millennia. "Bialowieza is unique. The forest has been there since the ice from the last Ice Age melted 12,000 years ago," explains Zdzislaw Szkiruc, director of the Bialowieza national park. The park spreads over around 16 percent of the Polish part of the forest. Another 20 percent is strictly protected and the remainder is administered by Poland's state-run National Forests organisation. Green activists have focused their energies on the battle to expand the designated national park area to cover the entire Polish part of the forest. But the mayor of Bialowieza, a town of 2,400 residents, is lukewarm about the plans. "We cannot forget about people who live near the forest," says Albert Litwinowicz. "Residents are divided over the prospect of the park being expanded," he says. "Previous enlargements brought more inconveniences than advantages. The government promised money, but not a cent was paid into our coffers," he said. "Today residents are afraid they won't be able to enter the park to gather mushrooms or berries as they have always done. Those who work in the woodland are afraid, they'll lose their jobs," the mayor explained. What residents think matters because under existing legislation it is up to their local representatives to decide on the park's extension -- another thing that environmentalists would like to see change. "Certainly, the Bialowieza forest doesn't belong only to us, it belongs to all Poles, it belongs to all of Europe and the residents of the region cannot be the only ones to decide about its future. "But why should they be the only ones to pay the price?" asks Litwinowicz.
ariane
02/9/2010
10:32
nuturing my lemon tree and elderberry tree in house. haven't tried anything coniferous
waldron
02/9/2010
10:15
still pine (ing) for a good oops wrong thread
wild bill
01/9/2010
13:54
great stuff marra take care
waldron
01/9/2010
13:25
I enjoyed the whole month - ta Welcome to September
wild bill
20/8/2010
10:31
Jonwig, Tree also have a plot in New Zealand and so they could also be earning a few pounds from this Carbon Trading !. Good Luck. http://www.cambiumfunds.com/fund_properties_renwick.html Renwick is positioned to serve the high-growth log markets of Asia via the export market. The location of this asset is within 45 miles of the port of Picton on the South Island of New Zealand.
tenapen
20/8/2010
10:21
Thanks for that - TREE has a small income (about £84,000) from this in Australia. It doesn't seem to be a core part of their strategy - at least not yet.
jonwig
20/8/2010
09:21
http://noir.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601109&sid=a0loHRLReCSw&pos=10 Aug. 19 (Bloomberg) -- New Zealand's sheep farmers are flocking to a government carbon trading program that pays more to plant trees than sell wool and mutton. Cont...
tenapen
11/8/2010
08:52
xd today 3p. Share price drop 1.5p. Some heavy buying recently.
jonwig
Chat Pages: 117  116  115  114  113  112  111  110  109  108  107  106  Older
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