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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Brown (n) Group Plc LSE:BWNG London Ordinary Share GB00B1P6ZR11 ORD 11 1/19P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  2.85 6.46% 47.00 2,975,142 16:35:29
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
46.10 47.30 49.10 42.45 45.40
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Retailers 594.90 35.70 9.63 4.9 133
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:27:07 O 231,388 47.00 GBX

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Date Time Title Posts
22/9/202021:27N.BROWN GROUP >>>> B R E A K O U T !!!!!2,937
26/8/202018:09No reaction to Results29
17/8/202014:54Future of N Brown Group-
01/7/202018:58Spindlers Fist - the N Brown saga13
31/8/201721:30N Brown cheapest retailer PER 12509

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Brown (n) (BWNG) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
17:31:4447.00231,388108,752.36O
17:30:4547.003,1081,460.76O
16:30:0348.0250,00024,008.00O
16:07:5247.0020,0009,400.00O
15:35:2947.0089,89342,249.71UT
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Brown (n) (BWNG) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
22/9/2020
09:20
Brown (n) Daily Update: Brown (n) Group Plc is listed in the General Retailers sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BWNG. The last closing price for Brown (n) was 44.15p.
Brown (n) Group Plc has a 4 week average price of 42.45p and a 12 week average price of 32p.
The 1 year high share price is 163.90p while the 1 year low share price is currently 10.02p.
There are currently 283,429,454 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 2,214,268 shares. The market capitalisation of Brown (n) Group Plc is £133,211,843.38.
18/9/2020
20:17
rastamouse: Fair point.Re BWNG share price movement, actually very predictable if you look at the last 6 months recovery story. We are still in a consolidation period but are now testing the upper levels of support.We are now getting very close to a pivotal moment re support/resistance. Everything points to the 200 DMA being broken soon.We are testing the upper boundaries.But, we live in unpredictable times.Peace out.
10/9/2020
15:23
jackson83: onjohn: 0 0 1 By Richard Evans 9 September 2020 • 5:00am A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.” This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund manager’s words, a “dog’s breakfast of it”. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,” said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “He’s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.” He added that there was “nothing wrong with the business” now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,” Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.” He said Superdry’s “reasonably priced casual wear” put it “in the right place” as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,” he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.” He said Superdry charged “premium prices” but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.” The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,” Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddled” because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,” he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.” Questor
10/9/2020
15:12
onjohn: SDRY 0 0 1 By Richard Evans 9 September 2020 • 5:00am A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.” This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund manager’s words, a “dog’s breakfast of it”. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,” said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “He’s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.” He added that there was “nothing wrong with the business” now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,” Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.” He said Superdry’s “reasonably priced casual wear” put it “in the right place” as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,” he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.” He said Superdry charged “premium prices” but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.” The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,” Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddled” because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,” he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.” Questor
09/9/2020
16:07
onjohn: By Richard Evans 9 September 2020 • 5:00am A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.” This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund manager’s words, a “dog’s breakfast of it”. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,” said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “He’s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.” He added that there was “nothing wrong with the business” now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,” Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.” He said Superdry’s “reasonably priced casual wear” put it “in the right place” as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,” he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.” He said Superdry charged “premium prices” but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.” The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,” Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddled” because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,” he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.” Questor
25/8/2020
16:51
mushyd97: Looking at previous year RNS it's highly unlikely we'll get a Q2 update. That being said, we could because of all this covid nonsense. The AGM is on 10th of September. Perhaps we'll get some information then... Maybe the q2 update along side it. Either way there's a guaranteed update in January, by that time I'd like to see the share price $1.20 ish or at least above a pound. I believe that is quite realistic as long as bwng can replicate the bare minimum of matching previous year figures sales whatever. IMHO strong buy at these levels for sure. I'm not a TA guy but I look at the trends, the last few months have shown me that we could be in aconsolidation phase for maybe slightly longer than some people think. However, we will get our next leg up . The price is at a good level for new buyers to begin accumulation too. Sit back and relax because when it rises it comes fast and hard . If you were spiked you'll get your money back plus some more....
13/8/2020
19:09
neophytos: Rasta... This might not be hows it's calculated (so correct me if my thinking is wrong). If BWNG really did get valued at £1bn, and BOOHOO is currently at £3.5bn, then BWNG would be valued 3.5x lower. BOOHOO's current share price is £32. a share price 3.5x lower that this is £9.1 a share! ASOS is 4.5x more than £1bn and has a share price today of £48 a share. 4.5x lower than this £10.6. Do we really feel BWNG could reach a share price of £9-£10? (24 months+ of course) Neo
25/6/2020
15:51
sh1984: Neo - As you mentioned, very difficult to predict, so many macro environmental factors at play. Markets are very volatile and highly reactive on any bad news at the moment with covid restrictions coming back into play in many countries. At current levels the market cap and PE ratio is undervalued and the share price didn't bounce due to concerns with covid infections on the increase again as restrictions are lifted. I think all economies can't afford full lockdowns anymore so in the 6 month term the share price will recover to normal levels. £1 by year end doesn't seem impossible for sure.
22/6/2020
11:18
neophytos: rasta - wouldn't a market cap of £400m put the share price at around 140p? (which is actually pre-covid price). Possibly I'm using the wrong calculation. What share price would you expect to see at £400m mrkcap? Neo.
12/6/2020
09:35
inever: The share price dropped from 143p to 106p when the Q3 results were released on January 16th. There were signs of a recovery at Simply Be but other results were a mixed bag. It probably explains why a new Retail Director position has been created and filled at the end of March. The responsibilities described seem to suggest this is more of a Buying and Merchandise Director role rather than "retail". It will take until Spring/Summer 2021 trading season for this role to have a real impact on the bottom line imo. So the business has problems but one must hope that the main costs of restructuring and closing the stores (all closed by the end of Feb 2019) are in the Fy2019 results, and therefore the level of “exceptionals” charged in FY20 will be minimal. When Q3 was announced, the guidance for FY20 was lowered to £70-72m as stated by others on this board. Brown's Q4 is actually only 8 weeks long so we can assume the guidance is accurate, and if it wasn't they should have issued a profits warning in early March, and they didn't. The share price plummeted because the market does not understand the securitisation twist to Brown's debt, and to a large extent still doesn't. But it will soon enough. Brown is profitable but has traditionally paid out too much in dividends. That dividend policy was addressed by the new CEO in Fy19, and the balance sheet will strengthen in the next few years. A new CFO has been recruited. The strategy of migrating to digital is the correct one but it is almost complete. Management has made all the right noises about the power and benefits of using data analytics to grow sales cost effectively but from reading Q1 to Q3 results, it hasn't yet demonstrated it has the skills to deliver on that. It appears to be struggling to turn data information into knowledge and it needs to look at its data analytics, brand creative, and marketing teams to ensure the right people and processes are in place. On May 19th, the group issued a “Trading and Financial Update” and this includes a real nugget of information regarding Home Essentials, their standalone Home brand. It was launched on April 1st and it helped to grow the Home & Gift categories by 74% in the six weeks, and they say “we look forward to providing more detail on this in our strategic brand review at the full year results in June.” I bet they do. On this Board, @paulof2 and @zico01 made some references to this on June 6th and 7th, with the former specifically referring to web traffic data as reported by similarweb. I have used a different platform to check the traffic levels but the information confirms homeessentials.co.uk has more UK traffic than JD Williams, customers spend almost three times as long on the site as on JD and visit over 6 pages compared to 3 on JD. The bounce rate is 40% compared to 66% on JD. And management has confirmed this is converting into sales judging by the May 19th statement. Home Essentials could become a real growth driver for the next few years. The May 19th statement confirms the group has sorted out its bank facilities and can see itself through this pandemic. What I don’t like about the May 19th statement is the claim that “decisive action to maximise operating efficiency and preserve liquidity ”includes an 80% reduction in marketing expenditure.” Brown’s competitors are struggling, cutting their own costs and competitors with a store portfolio are in the soup. Brown should be spending more on marketing in the right digital places (it should be cheaper because there is less competition) and driving hard to connect with customers when they are clearly spending more time online during lockdown. This would help drive brand awareness. Brown has no store portfolio to worry about at this time but seems to have forgotten it holds that advantage over its competitors and it could be stealing market share right now with competitors standing by helplessly. A brand that has moved to digital cannot afford to cut its marketing spend by 80%, unless of course it was wasting its marketing budget in the first place. Which brings me back to my point about the data analytics/brand creative/marketing skillset appearing to be weak at present. The CEO needs to sort this out fast. So my conclusion is that Brown is way undervalued and will enjoy a bounce after the results are announced shortly. I’d say £1 is likely soon. But if management can articulate a vision and grows the nuts to deliver it, Brown could enjoy a massive rerating and £4 would still be good value compared to the Boohoo and Asos valuations of today. They don’t have to bet the ranch to achieve it. They just have to move tactically and with urgency. It is all about data, and Brown has 2.9m active digital customers so it must have a lot of data on a lot of people in a specific demographic (size and age). But it won’t learn anything about them if it thinks cutting marketing spend by 80% is a good idea. If it doesn’t sort this out, then surely a takeover bid can’t be far away. The first thing anyone would do in a takeover would be to sell off the financial services arm for £300-£500m and with it would go the securitised debt. A long term service agreement could be put in place so that credit could still be offered to Brown customers. You’d then be left with a debt free brand-holding company that has £400m in the bank AND is profitable. A re-rating to a p/e of at least 15 would follow and now you have a £1bn plus company. A new CFO has been recruited from Aer Lingus who has no experience in apparel but does have a lot of experience at re-organisation post acquisition. The current p/e of 1-2 is a poor reflection of what the market thinks of this management team. If this management team can’t correct that in the next few months, they should be voted off at the next AGM. Brown should have a market cap of £1bn minimum, so what are they waiting for?
01/5/2020
10:47
jackson83: BWNG. This seems to have gone unnoticed this morning, ...looks like the FCA require some information....I wonder what is going on here... Share PricesBrown(n.) Grp. Share PriceBrown(n.) Grp. Regulatory NewsCompliance with LR9.2.6ER(1)Brown(n.) Grp. Regulatory News (BWNG)BWNG Share PriceBWNG Share NewsBWNG Share Chat2BWNG Share Trades80BWNG Live RNS BWNG Information Buy BWNG SharesAdd BWNG to WatchlistAdd BWNG to AlertAdd BWNG to myTerminal Share Price Information for Brown(n.) Grp. (BWNG) Share Price:23.85 Bid:23.30 Ask:23.90 Change:-0.70 (-2.85%) Spread: 0.600 (2.52%) Open: 25.00 High: 25.45 Low: 23.50 Yest. Close: 24.55 Last checked at 10:10:07 Compliance with LR9.2.6ER(1) Fri, 1st May 2020 07:00 RNS Number : 5769L Brown (N.) Group PLC 01 May 2020 N Brown Group plc (the "Company") 01 May 2020 Information disclosed in accordance with LR 9.2.6ER(1) In compliance with Listing Rule 9.2.6ER(1), the Company has forwarded to the FCA for publication a copy of its Articles of Association, which is the document that sets out the terms and conditions on which its listed equity shares were issued. A copy of the Company's Articles of Association has been submitted to the National Storage Mechanism and will be available for inspection shortly at: hxxps://data.fca.org.uk/#/nsm/nationalstoragemechanism For further information: Theresa Casey +44(0)161 238 2298 Company Secretary theresa.casey@nbrown.co.uk N Brown Group Plc This information is provided by RNS, the news service of the London Stock Exchange. RNS is approved by the Financial Conduct Authority to act as a Primary Information Provider in the United Kingdom. Terms and conditions relating to the use and distribution of this information may apply. For further information, please contact rns@lseg.com or visit www.rns.com. END CIRWPUBUCUPUGBU
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