Berkeley Dividends - BKG

Berkeley Dividends - BKG

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Stock Name Stock Symbol Market Stock Type Stock ISIN Stock Description
Berkeley Group Holdings (the) Plc BKG London Ordinary Share GB00B02L3W35 ORD SHS 5P
  Price Change Price Change % Stock Price High Price Low Price Open Price Close Price Last Trade
  11.00 0.25% 4,366.00 4,380.00 4,246.00 4,327.00 4,355.00 16:35:13
more quote information »
Industry Sector
HOUSEHOLD GOODS & HOME CONSTRUCTION

Berkeley BKG Dividends History

Announcement Date Type Currency Dividend Amount Period Start Period End Ex Date Record Date Payment Date Total Dividend Amount
15/08/2019InterimGBX20.0830/04/201830/04/201922/08/201923/08/201913/09/201927.2
07/12/2018InterimGBX7.1201/05/201831/10/201820/12/201821/12/201816/01/20190
16/08/2018InterimGBX33.330/04/201730/04/201823/08/201824/08/201814/09/201890.05
22/02/2018InterimGBX56.7501/05/201731/10/201701/03/201802/03/201823/03/20180
21/06/2017FinalGBX99.7630/04/201630/04/201724/08/201725/08/201715/09/2017185
23/02/2017InterimGBX85.2401/05/201631/10/201602/03/201703/03/201724/03/20170
15/06/2016FinalGBX10030/04/201530/04/201611/08/201612/08/201615/09/2016190
04/12/2015InterimGBX9001/05/201531/10/201517/12/201518/12/201522/01/20160
17/06/2015FinalGBX9030/04/201430/04/201513/08/201514/08/201517/09/2015180
05/12/2014InterimGBX9001/05/201431/10/201418/12/201419/12/201423/01/20150
18/06/2014FinalGBX9030/04/201330/04/201420/08/201422/08/201426/09/2014180
06/12/2013InterimGBX9001/05/201331/10/201318/12/201320/12/201317/01/20140
19/06/2013FinalGBX5930/04/201230/04/201328/08/201330/08/201327/09/201374
07/12/2012InterimGBX1501/05/201231/10/201220/03/201322/03/201319/04/20130
25/06/2004FinalGBX16.530/04/200330/04/200411/08/200413/08/200409/09/200422.3
05/12/2003InterimGBX5.801/05/200331/10/200314/01/200416/01/200412/02/20040
26/06/2003FinalGBX14.430/04/200230/04/200306/08/200308/08/200304/09/200319.2
12/12/2002InterimGBX4.801/05/200231/10/200215/01/200317/01/200314/02/20030
26/06/2002FinalGBX12.530/04/200130/04/200231/07/200202/07/200230/08/200216.5
13/12/2001InterimGBX401/05/200131/10/200116/01/200218/01/200215/02/20020
26/06/2001FinalGBX11.330/04/200030/04/200101/08/200103/08/200131/08/200114.9
12/12/2000InterimGBX3.601/05/200031/10/200008/01/200112/01/200109/02/20010
27/06/2000FinalGBX9.830/04/199930/04/200024/07/200028/07/200001/09/200012.9
14/12/1999InterimGBX3.101/05/199931/10/199910/01/200014/01/200011/02/20000
29/06/1999FinalGBX8.430/04/199830/04/199926/07/199930/07/199901/09/199911.2
08/12/1998InterimGBX2.801/05/199831/10/199804/01/199908/01/199912/02/19990
07/07/1998FinalGBX7.630/04/199730/04/199827/07/199831/07/199801/09/199810.25

Top Dividend Posts

DateSubject
20/11/2018
08:49
fenners66: Report being mentioned on Bloomberg about record number of unsold (presumably) new homes. That had been flagged on here for a while. Meanwhile share price drops and once again shows that the buyback has done nothing for long term holders. Cash spent - yield dropped - share price dropped - future sales dropping . I still contend that buybacks are a waste of money.
11/10/2018
21:59
fenners66: SO the share price has fallen and so has the dividend per share ..... Perfect outcome for the money spent on buy backs then..... NOT. How much money has been wasted allowing non supporters to exit ?
05/9/2018
11:50
fenners66: Buybacks started in January 2017 So almost 12 months now of buybacks were at on average higher market price than today - how many extra millions has that cost and how have today's shareholders benefited from that extra spend ? What would the share price have been with a higher yield instead ?
03/6/2018
04:01
r ball: Ok. But the share price is holding up well.
16/3/2018
12:51
this_is_me: The government's attack on buy to let will have the effect of reducing the number of properties available on the rental market and thus push the cost of renting much higher. If those with buy to let properties see no prospect of further capital gains in the foreseeable future that will also see selling out from the sector and the money reinvested elsewhere. Share buy backs at the current share price make no sense when the prospects are not great and the share price is likely to fall over the short/medium term. Share buybacks make sense only when the share price is stupidly low. I may have sold out a little early but I am not tempted to buy back in at present. The old saying that profit warnings come in threes has some validity.
16/3/2018
08:10
fenners66: pj fozzie - I am absolutely with you on share buy backs and this shows that all the shares bought over the last few months can do absolutely nothing for today's share price. Whereas the promise of a higher future yield I believe would.
22/2/2018
17:45
pj fozzie: I just wish they'd stop throwing the money away on buy backs - I'd so much rather have the cash. When the share price was below £30, I had some sympathy to the idea of buybacks (not much mind) - but at the current levels it just doesn't make sense to me - the shares do not look cheap. Cheers, PJ
08/12/2017
16:45
r ball: And just to think the share price was £7.50 not too long ago. Which is £3.50 net of dividends...
13/7/2017
10:09
jrphoenixw2: Maybe worth recapping how BKG originally framed it in their Interim Results a/o Dec 2016. 'SHAREHOLDER RETURNS PROGRAMME The Board of Berkeley has reviewed the mechanism for making the remaining £10.00 per share payments under the Shareholder Returns Programme that was put in place in 2011, and enhanced this time last year from £13.00 per share to £16.34 per share. The current heightened macro uncertainty has led to significant market volatility and there is a dislocation between this and both underlying market conditions and the strength of Berkeley’s operating model. As a consequence, the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility such that the remaining £10.00 per share payments can be made through a combination of share buy-backs and dividends, as opposed to solely dividends. This recognises that, at certain price points, the Board is of the opinion that the Company is materially undervalued and share buy-backs will be in the best interests of all shareholders. In making this change, the Board is also proposing that the payments should be re-characterised from being a value per share, to be an absolute value per annum. This ensures that the same quantum of cash will be returned as previously anticipated, but on a smaller number of shares, to the extent share buy-backs occur. This absolute value will be increased appropriately for any new shares issued. [page 1] THE BERKELEY GROUP HOLDINGS PLC INTERIM RESULTS FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDED 31 OCTOBER 2016 [page2] £ per share £’million Paid to date £6.34 £854.9 By 30 September 2017 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2018 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2019 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2020 £2.00 £277.7 By 30 September 2021 £2.00 £277.7 To come * £10.00 £1,388.5 Total £16.34 £2,243.4 * based on a net 138.8 million shares in issue as at 31 October 2016 The Board believes that this change will ensure that Berkeley’s shareholders fully benefit from the value embedded in the business. The Company will consult with Shareholders on consequential changes to the 2011 LTIP to ensure this reflects these changes, prior to a General Meeting of the Company in the New Year. [page 3 from the ‘Chairman̵7;s statement’] At the same time the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility to the Shareholder Returns programme so that future returns can be made by either dividends or share buy backs, as opposed to solely dividends, to the extent the Board believes the prevailing share price materially undervalues the Company and that such purchases would be in the best interests of all shareholders. It remains the intention of the Board to return £2 per share per annum over the next five years under this new mechanism and, for the avoidance of doubt therefore, this is not a reduction in the overall returns allocated to shareholders. [Chief Exec Statement – page 5] The Board of Berkeley has now reviewed the mechanism for making the remaining £10.00 per share payments in light of its assessment that the current short-term macro volatility is preventing the long-term value of Berkeley being recognised by the market. As a consequence, the Board is proposing to introduce flexibility such that the remaining £10.00 per share payments can be made through a combination of share buy-backs and dividends, as opposed to solely dividends. This recognises that, at certain price points, the Board is of the opinion that the Company is materially undervalued and share buy-backs will be in the best interests of all shareholders. In making this change, the Board is also proposing that the payments should be re-characterised from being a value per share, to be an absolute value per annum. This ensures that the same amount of cash will be returned as previously anticipated, but on a smaller number of shares, to the extent share buy-backs occur. This absolute value will be increased appropriately for any new shares issued. [same time-table as laid out above in Chairman’s Statement] The Board believes that this change will ensure that Berkeley’s shareholders fully benefit from the value embedded in the business. In February and August each year, the Company will announce the dividend to be paid at the end of March and September, respectively. This will be calculated as the absolute value amount to be delivered in the six months (£138.8 million based on the current shares in issue), less the cost of any share buy-backs undertaken in the relevant period. Going forward each subsequent relevant period begins on the date of announcement of the dividend for the previous relevant period.' hxxps://www.berkeleygroup.co.uk/media/pdf/d/q/Berkeley_Interim_Announcement_Dec_2016_-_FINAL.pdf
07/6/2017
06:52
garycook: Bargain buy While the prospects for the UK property sector have deteriorated, the buying opportunity for long-term investors may have improved. For example, Berkeley Group (LSE: BKG) continues to trade on a low valuation with a relatively high yield. Certainly, the prospects for the prime property market have worsened in recent months. The potential exodus of financial professionals and the uncertainty brought about by Brexit may lead to lower demand for prime property, but weaker sterling could help to offset this somewhat by encouraging foreign buyers to invest. With Berkeley now trading on a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 7.3, it appears to offer a wide margin of safety. Its dividend yield stands at over 6%, and yet is covered more than twice by profit. This suggests its future dividend payments are highly affordable and could provide an inflation-beating income stream for the company’s investors over a sustained period. Although UK house prices may fall and this may lead to some share price volatility in the near term, Berkeley appears to offer a mix of value and income potential for the long run. As such, even after a 12% rise since the start of the year, its share price could move higher.
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P: V: D:20191014 19:17:55