Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Barclays Plc LSE:BARC London Ordinary Share GB0031348658 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -0.70p -0.45% 155.62p 155.64p 155.74p 157.32p 154.76p 156.88p 26,541,048 16:35:18
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Banks 21,136.0 3,494.0 9.4 16.6 26,834

Barclays Share Discussion Threads

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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
11/6/2019
07:56
With 5 minutes to go before opening, I have the FT 100 at about + 14. Nice to have a repeat day of + 2p again
jpjohn1
10/6/2019
19:16
The simple answer is vote for any other part other than these betrayal scum now in the hoc
portside1
10/6/2019
19:11
Not one channel on tv news as or will put out this disgraceful news. The CBI silent with their dirty hands of greed
portside1
10/6/2019
19:09
The cbi and their actions to scare the U.K. public is a disgrace To tell untrue statements to the U.K. via the Eu by the cbi Should be on all tv channels but alas Not one will put the information on its news Silence from the scum
portside1
10/6/2019
16:49
Clearly john berkow has a very bad case of little fat man syndrome It's quite common Did he ever take drugs though ? only 3 out of the 11 Tory hopeless didn't We voters should know just who amongst the MP's seeking election next time round did or didn't .
buywell3
10/6/2019
16:45
We do often get a poor count up at the end of the day. On the count up about half of the entire day's trade . Not a bad day here, could do with a few more days like it and get back to at least the 160s :)
jpjohn1
10/6/2019
11:52
APR 2019 Barclays vs Lloyds Barclays and Lloyds are the key banks in the UK sector and despite some similarities there is also glaring differences. I often get asked by clients, which is the better of the two? One is the “boring” but steady and the other is “exciting̶1;,but can also be unstable. In this report I have looked at the pair and drawn up some key comparisons. Both have caused investors huge frustrations over recent years but both for very different reasons. Barclays Plc (BARC) Yield 4.32% Identity Crisis There’s no doubting that Barclays has some great businesses when you scratch the surface. It is of course one of the UK’s big four banks with over 23 million customers. It’s also the UK’s leading issuer of credit cards, the leading stockbroker, a leading wealth manager and has a leading investment bank. It is fair to say that Barclays is not the global bank it once was. With the exception of the US, it has largely retreated from foreign markets. Only a few years ago it had major operations in Europe and Africa in particular, but these have been sold off. What we have left is a UK-US focused bank. Expansion is no longer the name of the game. Today it’s all about profits and dividends. Prized Asset One thing that sets Barclays apart from the UK’s other big four banks is its large and sometimes successful investment bank. Investment banking is seen as the riskier but more lucrative cousin of retail banking. Instead of mortgages and current accounts, it involves things like advice on takeovers, raising debt and equity for large corporations and trading of bonds and shares. Barclays is the only British bank to make serious headway in investment banking, boosted by its opportunistic buy of Lehman Brothers core business during the financial crisis. This gave Barclays a leg up to compete with Wall Street’s titans such as Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. Becoming a major player has not come easy or cheap, so it’s understandable why Barclays is reluctant to part with one of its best assets, even if it is unfashionable. While investment banking adds extra volatility to earnings it can also generate mega-money in good times – on a scale that retail banking can never do. While investment banking adds extra volatility to earnings it can also generate mega-money in good times, on a scale that retail banking can never do. And those worried about another financial crisis should note that Barclays has been the first of the major British banks to successfully ring-fence its UK retail operations. The Revolving Door Shareholders like stable leadership and a clear strategy, which is fair enough, but in the last decade, Barclays has provided neither. Barclays vs Lloyds 01 www.atlanticmarkets.co.uk Since 2011, Barclays has had four different CEOs. The principal reason for the high turnover of CEOs has been a continuous series of scandals. As we know, whenever there is a big scandal, the media and politicians call for someone’s head, and in Barclay’s case, that’s been the CEO. Even the current CEO, Jes Staley, has been lucky to survive several scandals. As you’d expect, every CEO has had his own vision for Barclays and has set about making it happen, only to be replaced before he gets the job done. The new guy has then come in and taken the bank in a different direction. While there are no guarantees the present CEO will be around for the long-term, the hope is that the Board of Directors understands that the share price has been hampered by the lack of continuity, so will endeavour to create more stable leadership. Even if it has yet to be rewarded, the new strategy for Barclays seems a lot less complicated. A focus on transatlantic operations will be much easier to understand and manage. We’ve noted that Barclays is now taking a leaf out of Lloyd’s book and continuously using the words simple and straightforward. I don’t think Barclays will ever be a simple as Lloyds, but nor should it try to be. It’s got a better spread of assets and products. You can’t be simple and diversified at the same time. Lloyds Bank (LLOY) Yield 6.19% Lloyds is back to doing what it does best – current accounts, mortgages, personal and business loans, life insurance...sound dull? Thank goodness. Fund managers in the City used to mockingly call Lloyds “the world’s most boring bank”, who knew that would become a compliment. It’s taken many years for Lloyds to recover from the financial crisis, not only financially, but also on a reputational level. As we know, Lloyds made a near fatal error when it bought HBOS in the thick of the fog back in 2008. In the four years that followed, the HBOS side of the business would incur a mammoth £45 billion of loan impairments in addition to £10 billion from the Lloyds side. It was enough to bring any financial institution to its knees and Lloyds was forced into a £20 billion government bailout. The UKs First ‘SuperbankR17; Bailout aside, the purchase of HBOS propelled Lloyds to become the UK’s first ‘super bank’. Bear in mind, if the acquisition had taken place in ordinary times, such a major move would have faced tremendous opposition and likely to have been blocked altogether by competition regulators. Together, the two banks had relationships with four out of ten consumers. The timing of the deal was terrible, but the cost savings have been tremendous. The initial aim was to achieve a target of £1 billion of annual cost savings, but it wasn’t long before this was revised up to £1.5 billion, then to over £2 billion. Road to Recovery Lloyds continues to make progress with a strong start to the Group’s latest strategic plan and the planned integration of Zurich and MBNA and launch of Lloyds Bank Corporate Markets all Barclays vs Lloyds 02 www.atlanticmarkets.co.uk going to plan. The biggest appeal for the potential share buyer is the recent increase to the interim ordinary dividend. This and the overall Improved guidance offer investors some respite and positivity to look forward to. One thing that Lloyds has long been known for is its ability to keep a tight rein on costs, and that’s where a lot of the profit improvement is coming from. Lloyds has the lowest cost base of the big four banks. It also has a very strong capital position, more than double the minimum allowable level. What’s more, Lloyds has no net reliance on wholesale funding – meaning it’s self-funded. PPI Pay-outs The total PPI provisions for Lloyds now stands at a staggering £19.4bn since 2011. The compensation payments have been so vast that the Financial Times mockingly referred to Lloyds as “a cash dispenser to the people”. On the bright side, it’s a big achievement that Lloyds’ has been able to pay out billions in compensation and not only survive, but resume making good profits. Given the strength of the underlying business, it shouldn’t be too long before Lloyds switches over to being a cash dispenser to its shareholders. How They Compare Lloyds is a better run business with a far superior cost to income ratio. It is also safer with a substantially higher capital ratio. It offers investors an attractive and growing dividend yield at a modest forecast PE ratio. While its business has a narrow focus, it is the UK’s most straightforward bank. In short, it’s an income play with good upside potential. The net asset value per share is not so appealing to investors compared to Barclays. Lloyds NAV (exc intangibles) is 55.51p compared to Barclays far more appealing 318.58p. Barclays has a lot of catching up to do. Its costs are way too high, and its capital could do with a boost. Both of these points are being addressed. The recent dividend increases are now appealing to the income investor, but this has weighed on the company’s overall dividend cover. Barclays dividend cover is 1.45 compared to a healthier cover for Lloyds at 1.71. The biggest attraction of Barclays is its deep discount to net assets. The dividend cover does also offer investors the comfort. There’s a lot of potential upside that could be unlocked if the management team can run the business in a cohesive and consistent manner. For investors prepared to take a longer view, Barclays is a bargain. Barclays vs Lloyds 03
bernie37
10/6/2019
11:44
they mange to sale my best order at 1103 !!
jaws6
10/6/2019
11:24
its working now - what a pile of .... that platform is
eurofox
10/6/2019
10:58
Trader agree
jaws6
10/6/2019
10:57
not only down, now they do not answer on phone. Talk to them from 809 to sale 1500 shares at best ,still not done. well done BARCLYS. if your fault you should pay clients. or say big SORRY, and pay £ 5000 to charity for your mistake.
jaws6
10/6/2019
08:56
BARC Smart Investor platform down this morning. Always happens after system upgrade work at the W/E.
trader2
10/6/2019
07:58
I have the FT 100 coming in at about + 34 to start with
jpjohn1
09/6/2019
11:20
DerrickTrotter : i am using barclays for last 20+ yeares ,( i had account with charles shwab that was taken over by barclays )£6 per trade + monthly fees , Barclays Price Improver save me more then monthly fees , i have tried almost all other brokers but overall barclays is best for me .
rasl5
08/6/2019
19:53
Their is something wrong for all this hype by Staley and co Yet we go nowhere ,Is Staley being honest ,About the results are they being managed to look better than they are ,In July their must be good answers to this question
portside1
08/6/2019
16:31
Like you bernie I am optimistic here . Like to see this heading towards the 170p mark. Out of the FT 100, Barclays have one of the best ratings out of any of these companies, they can't be all wrong
jpjohn1
08/6/2019
16:20
Fingers crossed Our position today Barclays is now through the period of necessary restructuring and the significant associated costs. Our diversified business is stable and well positioned for current and future market conditions, and we have a seasoned management team delivering improving performance and returns. With the costs of restructuring behind us, we are beginning to generate improved and sustainable returns and distribute excess capital to shareholders. The quality of our earnings is the result of a deliberate choice to maintain diversity in our revenue streams, based on an understanding of structural changes in our sector, and the need to weather cyclical economic forces. Today, we are on track to reach our RoTE, Capital and Cost targets for 2019 and beyond. Excluding litigation and conduct, in 2018 our Group RoTE was 8.5% and our earnings per share (EPS) have grown from 3.8p in 2014 to 21.9p in 2018. Our 2018 at 13.2% our CET1 ratio was at our target of around 13%. Costs were within our guidance range of £13.6-13.9bn. Through our creation of Barclays Execution Services (BX) with its lower operating costs, we are able to increase our investment in key areas including technology, security and controls, while simultaneously reducing our costs and our cost to income ratio. As our overriding priority for 2019 and 2020 is the attainment of our returns targets, we are also able to flex our investment to a degree to support our RoTE targets if the environment requires us to do so. Returning capital to shareholders continues to be a priority for us and we will pay a dividend for 2018 of 6.5p, which is more than double the amount paid in 2016 and 2017. It is our firm intent to return a greater proportion of our earnings to shareholders over time, and we believe that the effective application of our strategy is critical to achieving this.
bernie37
07/6/2019
17:05
Disappointing day here with FT 100 up so wellAt least we finished positive on the week going up 1.72p or 1.15% . The FT 100 was up 170.24 points High for the week 153.52p and Low 147.50pOnly Broker comment was Goldman, they put a Neutral and a TP of 200pOut of the 17 Brokers covering BarclaysBuy 10, Hold 6, Sell 1 and a consensus of 216.79 ( it does seem miles away at the moment )Have a good weekend all
jpjohn1
07/6/2019
17:02
In the old days to become a director you had to work hard, these days you get a loan from Bank of America and buy your way in, guess it's all down to your credit score.
sasbod
07/6/2019
17:00
Reckon Bramson must be forced to sell down his stake at some point...
sasbod
07/6/2019
16:23
150P Still undecided if this one is massively undervalued or about to plunge!!
claret dragon
07/6/2019
16:17
bernie37, Unfortunately the number of shares in issue has more than doubled. Barclays continue to dilute existing share holders to this day due to how they issue the dividend (scrip). Barclays need to stop diluting and buying back/cancelling the shares and reverse the dilution. It's an uphill battle otherwise.
smurfy2001
07/6/2019
15:54
As mentioned earlier today it really would seem that Barc is being held back for some reason, it normally follows the footsie but not today
billbailey1
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