Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Central African Mining & Exp Co LSE:CFM London Ordinary Share GB0031253643 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 20.00p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Mining 96.6 54.2 2.8 7.1 574.19

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DateSubject
25/9/2016
09:20
Central African Mining Daily Update: Central African Mining & Exp Co is listed in the Mining sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker CFM. The last closing price for Central African Mining was 20p.
Central African Mining & Exp Co has a 4 week average price of - and a 12 week average price of -.
The 1 year high share price is - while the 1 year low share price is currently -.
There are currently 2,870,932,753 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 0 shares. The market capitalisation of Central African Mining & Exp Co is £574,186,550.60.
17/9/2009
11:44
utterly pointless: From Markets Live Alphaville MJAnother "interesting" story we have followed here also came around yesterday BEYou mean Camec? MJI do. BEAlthough the price caught people off guard. MJIt was a full 10 pence lower than rumoured BEYup BECan you give us a Camec price Miles? MJDown 0.25p at 18.5p MJAs Cityunslicker notes, this one was, how should it be put, was already widely priced in BEAmbrian stuck out a note on this last night, which explains in slightly euphemistic terms why retail shareholders are unlikely to chisel out any more cash. BEAfter increasing press speculation this certainly doesn't come out of the blue; however, we had previously expected a higher premium. The bid price of 20p compares with our SOTP DCF valuation of 28p de-risked (ie, with growth projects funded) or 21p risked (higher discount on unfunded growth projects). Thus, we see fair value closer to 25p in the short term, but this does have to be compared with the valuation that the market would give to CAMEC in the absence of any bid. BEWe always considered a position in CAMEC to have downside protection with upside optionality, so are disappointed with the former coming to bear rather than the latter, and also not to see a higher premium. Certainly, if the stock trades materially below 20p we see value as we think that a bid is more likely than not given the quality of the assets. Two key factors could trigger improved returns: (1) CAMEC shareholders holding out for a higher bid; or (2) a counter bid, notably from Chinese parties which, in our view, would see the cobalt off-take as a key strategic holding. However, we would expect any Chinese bid to be for only 29.9% of the company (or alternatively offer to fund an equity raise to take them to 29.9%), as the Chinese typically prefer off-take in exchange for an equity stake rather than outright control of mining companies. BEGiven that a counter-bid would leave existing CAMEC management in place, and wouldn't necessarily leave the company with new cash to develop projects, there is an argument that a 100% cash bid would be preferable to some shareholders. Also, 20p does offer a premium to CAMEC's share price since the beginning of the year (although obviously at a discount to last year's share price). BEAs such, given that: any counter-bid is completely speculative at this stage; institutional shareholders are in a minority (ie, it will be difficult to force a higher bid); and a 20p cash bid crystallises value for all shareholders, we update our Buy recommendation and 28p target price to a HOLD recommendation with a 20p target until ENRC clarifies its position.
30/7/2009
01:18
josels: The mining licenses in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have been renewed not so far ago and (for what I heard in this bb) Camec is regarded as a very good employer who spends in social infrastructure (refer to 7958 of 7960) Assets in Zimbabwe already fully discounted in the current share price any improvement in that country and Camec should benefit. Does the Dispatches journalist know the social benefits that Camec is bringing in many parts of Africa? I noticed that Dispatches makes reference to a "take over" of Camec, are they referring to the latest RNS? I think so which suggests to me that someone made the video to de-ramp the takeover, may be a large miner to buy the company on the cheap. Also they say that Robert Mugabe has shares in Camec, how do they know that? It seems as if the journalist is very against Camec, is he or his friends short in Camec shares? I do not understand why all de-rampers are focusing in CAMEC and not for instance in others Zimbabwe companies listed in the AIM, after all CAMEC has none cash generative asset in Zimbabwe and those assets are IMHO totally discounted in the current share price. If we should sell our shares in companies where crooks and dictators have shares then most probably we could not have any share in any company. Also why not to close the majority of London hotels (please visit some of London hotels in summer and you will find large numbers or royalty and dubious elite from non democratic countries eating caviar while their servants in many cases sleep in the floor), weapons factories, London top jewelers (to mention a few) that serve so well to so many oppressive regimes?
24/7/2009
16:05
davius: Josels, presumably you're referring to IFL? Great news over there are a storming share price (continued today where it left off yesterday). Clearly a good sign that Chinese Banks are happy to put us the cash for companies mining in Africa. The way the IFL share price has moved you'd think there was a bit coming there too. A commitment of from the Chinese to take cobalt and/or copper would be good for CAMEC, but with commodity prices rising strongly they don't really need it.
15/7/2009
20:36
davius: That 17m trade is an interesting one. Quite clearly it must have been worked, so either it was a sell and held the share price back until complete, or it was a buy (the offer didn't get moving past 11p except briefly, for the first 4 hours) and the share price was held back until enough stock was available. It matters not either way. Whether a buy order or a sale overhang, it is now in the price, which has moved ahead strongly this afternoon. Smiles all round no doubt. I haven't had this good a day for a few months. What with this, Jarvis and Tanfield all flying today I'm hoping that we can hold on to these gains tomorrow. Thus far the DOW looks to be helping, still well ahead and nudging 8600.
15/5/2009
09:29
bobby.ifa: I bought some copper ETF's on the strength of that 412069, LCOP. Cheers, takes the pressure of the sCFM share price, as you're actually dealing with the commodity itself and as this ETF is leveraged you get twice the gain &, gulp, twice the loss.
13/4/2009
19:13
412069: Evening all, we shuold see the pace of CFM's share price reflect that of copper but any sort of good news will add 50% + onto the share price that day depending on where the share price is on rns day! which will be well above the current share price A opening of 7.10p bid/ 7.35p offer first thing in the morning, with double figures by weeks end. And then in share price movements of 0.25p by months end. Happy days ahead.
30/3/2009
17:26
ray164: If you compare the charts for the past year for the copper price and the cfm share price it appears that the share price is a leveraged bet on the price of copper. IMHO the price of copper will be the best predictor of the cfm share price in the immediate future. So if the rally in copper continues for a little longer there may be some worthwhile gains to be made. My other thinking on this company is that with their considerable assets and current low share price they must surely be a tempting takeover target for one of the majors.
13/3/2009
09:21
davius: > silverbackalpha - 12 Mar'09 - 18:09 - 4488 of 4493 > The devastation investors have seen in this share is truly dispicable. The > sheer destruction of shareholder value and wealth across this stock, sector > and the marekt. > This will take a long time to heal IMO....if ever. The big seller at around > 3p seems to still be here. Hmm, posted yesterday after the third consequetive rise and back up to a share price not seen since early February. The low on the 19th December was 1.91p. We are now 75% above that level. Nothing wrong with being frustrated with a subdued share price if you are holding, but I see no sense in lamenting the share price performance when it is rising steadily.
29/12/2008
08:48
412069: Small Talk: Funds dried up as caution replaced speculation By Alistair Dawber Monday, 29 December 2008 Print Email Search Search Go Independent.co.uk Web Bookmark & Share Digg It del.icio.us Facebook Reddit What are these? Change font size: A | A | A There are few companies that can say that 2008 has been a fun year on the Alternative Investment Market (Aim). For most, the last 12 months has been a period to rein in spending and cut costs wherever possible. Small cap IPOs, the lifeblood of Aim, have all but ceased. The reasons why this year has been so disastrous are obvious. As investors saw their funds shrinking from the record highs of the previous few years, they cut their losses and headed for the perceived safer havens of bigger main-listed groups – who can get into trouble when they follow the herd, instead of losing their shirt on a speculative Aim punt? The DNA of the Aim market over the last few years of easy liquidity has started to unravel, with a fatal effect for some. The Queen's tailor, Hardy Amies, for example, went into administration in October after being starved of investor support. Sectors such as the biotech industry, and oil and gas exploration – predicated on the business plan of burning through investors' money in the hope of hitting on the latest blockbuster drug, or finding vast quantities of oil – have fallen foul of increased investor caution. "It has been a very bad year for the Aim: since June especially it has been pretty bloody and the market has fallen off a cliff," says David Snell, Aim leader at the advisory group PricewaterhouseCooper. "After an explosion of growth on Aim between 2003 and 2007, this year has been the worst for new admissions since 1998." But with the majority of Aim-listed chief executives no doubt pleased to see the back of 2008, what does next year hold in store? With the Office of National Statistics expected to confirm soon that the UK economy is in recession, the news for small-cap companies is getting no better. Investor confidence will only return with an improvement in the macroeconomic situation, and by that time it could be too late for many Aim-listed groups. "The financial crisis will continue next year and for the Aim market, this is a particular issue," Mr Snell says. "More than 50 per cent of the market now have a market capitalisation of less than £10m, and that is really too small for a public listing. Some will be consolidated and some will be forced to issue emergency rights; if the market will take them. For other struggling groups the prospects are bad and some will not survive." The worst-hit sectors next year are likely to remain the same as those that have struggled through 2008. Ernst & Young's index of Aim's top 20 miners makes depressing reading, with a fall of 77 per cent over the last 12 months. Tim Williams, the firm's director of mining and metals, says: "Aim's junior exploration companies were hit particularly hard, as routes to capital became closed, and as share prices and market valuations were punished by the extreme market turbulence." Just £973m was raised over the course of the year, compared with a record £2.4bn in 2007. The result will almost certainly be a year of penury for many of the 181 small-cap miners that remain on Aim, down from 197 at the start of the year. There have been those that have offered solutions to the stilted market. Clive Garston, a solicitor and Aim specialist at the law firm Halliwells, believes that the ban on ISAs being invested in Aim-listed companies should be lifted. Mr Garston's argument is that, with investors turned off the idea of putting money directly into nearly every Aim company, the shortfall can be partly made up by relaxing the restrictions on ISA investments. "There are a number of big companies on Aim that ISAs do not have access to," says Mr Garston, who argues that these companies are no riskier than some of the smaller outfits on the main list. Whether that is the solution to Aim's current quandary remains to be seen. It seems unlikely that private investors currently shunning the Aim market as too risky would be pleased to learn that their investments are being used to plug the gap left by risk-averse professional fund managers. Either way, Mr Garston reckons on a grim outlook for Aim. "You can't be terribly optimistic about 2009," he says. "There is no appetite for equity funding at the moment, and certainly none for start-ups, hi-tech and generally riskier companies. Hopefully this will start to change in 2009, but frankly, it is more likely to be 2010." A story of 2008: plenty of good news but share price slumps communications Software Radio Technology embodies all that has gone wrong with Aim companies in 2008. The makers of the tetra radios used by police forces, and the AIS marine systems, used to alert ships of the presence of others close by, has offered the market plenty of cheer over the last 12 months. The group had hoped that its latest bit of good news in September – that the US Federal Communications Commission had approved the group's marine devices for use in the American market – would prove to be the catalyst the group was hoping for. In practice, sadly not. Despite the efforts of the managing director, Simon Tucker, who bought the group after overhearing a conversation about it on a train, the company has seen its share price continue to drift. It eventually finished last week at 550p,88 per cent down on the year. Red faces after Phytopharmis hit by Unilever pull-out pharmaceuticals Another small-cap group that would rather forget 2008, while at the same time having plenty of reasons to worry about what 2009 might bring, is the biotech group Phytopharm. Analysts at the house broker, KBC Peel Hunt, spent the better part of the year saying that the company, which makes an appetite suppressant from the Hoodia plant, had a 75 per cent chance of getting its product through third and final phase testing before watching the money roll in. The 75 per cent chance was conditional on the group's alliance with the consumer goods group Unilever, which had designs on using the Hoodia product in its Slimfast milkshakes. Except that Unilever was never quite as keen as Phytopharm would have liked it to be, and it withdrew from the agreement last month. Phytopharm's share price dropped by half – no doubt leaving a few red faces at KBC, which had been encouraging investors to buy the stock. Healthy outlook for surgical technology supplier biotech The outlook for most small-cap biotech firms is bleak in 2009, with being bought on the cheap by the bigger groups the best some of the most cash-starved can hope for. But there are success stories out there. Cheshire-based Advanced Medical Solutions, which produces dressings and the technology to close wounds during surgery, may have about the dullest name on Aim, but it became one of the market's pin-ups last year. The usually cautious chief executive, Don Evans, above, is upbeat on getting approval for new surgical technology in January, and unlike nearly every peer, AMS's share price is up by more than 34 per cent in the last year. The key, says Mr Evans, is to have "multiple products in multiple markets," which helped the group to become profitable two years ago. Edmonds branches into the African healthcare field healthcare Phil Edmonds, the former cricketer, is one of the Aim market's great survivors, so do not expect the small matter of a global economic slump to get in the way of his growing African empire. In June, he raised £5m listing his latest wheeze, African Medical Investments (AMI), a move away from his usual areas of mining and oil exploration. AMI seeks to invest in businesses in the healthcare sector in Africa, "particularly those providing services to the continent's emerging middle classes and overseas businesses". While Mr Edmonds is a gifted businessman, the move into medical provision comes as some of his resources groups have come under pressure from the collapse in commodities prices. White Nile Group – which is about to switch focus to the agricultural sector, having decided that oil and gas exploration in southern Sudan just is not bringing in the readies – has lost more than 90 per cent of its value in the last 12 months. Another group listed by Mr Edmonds in August, BioEnergy Africa, has lost half its value since coming to market, while CAMEC, one of the stable's bigger companies, is down nearly 95 per cent on a year ago.
28/10/2008
14:07
davius: My guess is a bit of both tobler. The tweedle twins at the top complain about a weak share price, yet continue to issue new shares as though they were toilet paper. The profits jump hugely, but on the back of selling investments rather than making money from mining. They come up with a Zimbabwe deal which appears to support the Mugabe regime with a cash loan. They state that the share price at 27p undervalues the company, then fail to begin an EGM agreed buy back when it slumps to below 5p. True, commodity prices, particularly copper, have taken a pounding recently, and the entire sector is at record lows. But I think that this share price crash is far more sentiment than fundamentals. Were Mr Dum and Mr Dee replaced I think that this share price would be history. But for now they have a hard job convincing the markets that CAMEC deserves to trade at anything above a fraction of net asset value. (Hard to come up with a sensible NAV, but has to be several times the current market cap I'd have thought).
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