Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Aim Investments LSE:AIM London Ordinary Share GB00B01TVW49 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 0.525p 0.00p 0.00p - - - 0.00 05:00:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 0.0 -0.1 -1.0 - 1.46

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DateSubject
28/7/2013
10:17
dieseltaylor: Whilst saying that the AIM market has a mix of dubious directors and good directors perhaps it is fair to remember that PI's have lost far far more money on mainstream companies such as the Scottish Banks and other media darlings like Bookham and GEC. I welcome the thread as collating all the dastardly deeds is a useful reality check for current and potential investors. Firstly lets be fair that not every Director is a crook and that sometimes companies fail because of events outside their control. A recent example of that is TRT where continuing riots in the South African mining industry delayed the fitting and subsequent contract for mega-truck TPMS [iTrack]. The upshot was that TRT got screwed by L&G on a placing price and whether the placing would have been necessary but for the delay in a million pound contract is moot. Fault of the Directors - not really but judging from some investors they are not very capable. Seems a harsh and my view is everything takes longer than investors think it should and that their investments should be immune to world affairs! Staying with TRT the City and the original Board managed to puff the company to a £22 price in 2000. That the claims made for the Company were highly speculative and in a coup in 2007 PI's forced most of the Board out and installed their own guys. They found the cupboard bare and the much touted American [GM] auto maker connection was a decade away from using the star torque sensor. So first rule DO NOT TRUST THE "CITY" - they do not research well - they want to make lots of money - they ethics of the majority are dubious DO NOT TRUST THE MEDIA - they are shills and pretty thick ones Exceptions - if the piece is negative it may be true and written by a honest man - read off the subject as in I read the Economist for information of Mongolian politics and then deduce a risk factor DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH - I avoid several areas of investment as there are few ways to check the information and a history of train wrecks. So pharmaceuticals are risky, mining, oil exploration especially so. - Look at the competitors in the same area .... solar panels , CHP systems, AIS devices and then decide if the pace of development is too wild to keep track of. SRT for AIS is a whale in a small growing sea so that makes it investable. Solar panels the technology changes almost daily. It helps to read science and trade mags to get a fell for what is going on. - seems to me a major weakness for most investors is that they have no idea what the competition are doing. DIRECTORS - Directors, see what has happened to companies they have been involved in previously. I used to be invested in AFC excited by their technology but since coming to the market the Directors have changed. Curiously one of the originals had to resign as he had omitted certain required details in the Prospectus. Back as a commercial Director he announced a deal with an Indonesia government entity. Never happened .. and in any event given how corrupt Indonesia is I never really believed it would happen. Ringing the office to find out if the promised funds were in was educational. - Directors and competency. CRA is an example I know of where the founders were lacking in managerial and commercial skills as it transpired several years down the track. Also true of TRT were the Directors signed poor contracts probably on the basis of adding world famous names to boost the price or possibly realising they actually were years from meaningful development of a commercially successful product. However for incompetent Directors and Boards look no further than the incompetents of the Scottish Banks. The feeling now seems that the organisations were too big to comprehend which is a mighty convenient excuse for the regulators and the fund managers, and the vast amount of analysis saying how bloody wonderful Sir Fred was as the share price went ballistic. Trained as a banker and looking at the rubbish being put into the mortgage system I knew it was all shaky stuff, the corporate lending was woefully inept but that I could not get detail on. GEC sold of all its money-making bits and manged to destroy itself so lets credit the supine Board directors. Is AIM really that much worse? hxxp://www.theregister.co.uk/2001/07/17/oracle_aided_marconi_collapse/
15/3/2013
08:16
scrapman: Been considering the subject for this thread for a good while. It seems there are more and more comments on many Boards despairing about the inadequacies and questionable machinations of the AIM market. If there really is a conspiracy of shady dealers , how come no one has spoken out against it , and gone on the record to point the finger against "the establishment". I would have thought there would have been a few disillusioned souls that would have been prepared to say something. The more you study the trading patterns and day to day operations of many shares on AIM it is hard not to come to the conclusion that there is more going on than a straight forward trading market. My own view , is that markets have certainly changed in the 20 years or more I have been trading, there are very few straight forward , buy and hold stories, Buy out situations are often either well flagged before hand ,and often preceded by several periods of rise and and drop , which on the surface appear to favour a well run operation with prior knowledge. Giving several profit opportunities with profits taken each way on rise and fall , before the final buyout situation comes to fruition. A few to look at : GKP The largest share ever on AIM according to some , and what should be a shining example of what is possible, instead , we have had numerous threads on the bulletin boards with 100s of 000s of posts People stalking on Twitter , who had to be silenced by a legal action , Hugely volatile swings in price from a high of 4.60 , down to a recent 180p a court case , that by all accounts is truly farcical , but has dragged on for two years, a supposed "news blackout" from the company , that is holding back all sorts of information regarding status of drills etc These are brief highlights of many comments relating to all aspects of what is "supposed" to be going on , for greater detail look at the various BB, If you were involved in the market and had anyway of being able to move or simply "influence" the market in a particular direction , just think how many opportunities there have been over the years with this one. And if there is going to be a bid at the end of this long and turbulent trek , that is supposed to be worth anything from £6 ,/ £8 ,up to many multiples of that , valuing the company at " Billions", what are the chances that the market is simply going to let Mr Private Investor reap the rewards without putting a few obstacles in the way After that there are many many more examples, The Falkland oil shares , RKH FOGL, DES ARG Everything from Sunday Newspaper journalists supposedly bringing a scoop to the market prior to results , To an Oil find subsequently being declared as water , Pump and dump operations on a huge scale on many of them XEL Energy Directors state "there is much further to go in the share price" , when it is above three pounds , directors subsequently sell a percentage (not all ) of their holdings , soon followed by a plummet in the price to under a pound __________________________________________________ These are just a token sample and a very cursory summing up of the details , I am sure every one has many more examples of specific shares and their trading pattern , perhaps you can give a quick resume here My real intention for his thread is to establish a platform where investors and shareholders can get the information highlighted in a public way and chronologically record it, so that if in some future time there were to be any legal proceedings against any parties , be it negligent directors , or other unscrupulous traders for rigging the market it may serve as a starting point . Or indeed , for any new investors looking to start trading , perhaps act as a salient " Heads Up " as to what may or may not be going on in the day to day operation of the markets. All IMHO etc , no advice given or intended http://www.londonstockexchange.com/companies-and-advisors/aim/aim/aim.htm
01/11/2012
14:51
interceptor2: I think the following is worth on inclusion. SSY Scisys PLC / Provide professional and IT services to large corperate and public sector, plus to European Space agency. UK Based Dividend 2.02%, covered x 5.39 Share Price over 100ma PE = 9.75 ic2...
02/10/2012
12:22
valhamos: Hi Saucepan DSG - Yes I've been a holder for a while and I flagged it up here last week (post 13). CR briefly put it in the header, but it then got canned - I guess because it hasn't got the momentum CR is looking for :( Based on the results and what the company is doing I am expecting renewed interest and the share price to resume it move upwards so I bought more last week.
27/9/2012
07:31
felix99: Best add FRP - Fairpoint to your list CR . Provide personal debt solutions and claims services. Just increased divi to 1.95p and big turnaround in profitability from the low. In addition secondhalf is busier time of year and they are printing cash at present. Essentially they are gaining huge windfalls from PPI claims generally and more importantly from the PPI claims they have to make for clients in IVA. They have 20k of clients - most will have PPI . Its a largely captive audience who cannot go elsewhere. I reckon there will be £15m of fee income for claims in their - which they will get a good proportion of in terms of doing the claim itself and also in terms of 15% of the net proceeds paid into the IVA. IVA numbers are down but they have so much income they can take off 20k of current IVAs its untrue. Add to that a £9m VAT reclaim - not yet processed in the books. I reckon £5-£6m of that will end up as a windfall to FRP as well. Big money and share price still cheap. I have been in since 70p and as ever should have loaded up more.
25/9/2012
11:02
cockneyrebel: Hi - this is a new discussion/highlight thread for AIM stocks which pay dividends. I'll keep those highlighted here in the header. In my opinion AIM is full of a load of scammy dross, floated here with one aim and one aim only an that being to allow the founding shareholders to sell out. AIM floats that just drift endlessly tend to suggest selling imo. It seems rare that you get an AIM float that rises from the off these days. The reason I'm looking for divi payers is that these tend to be far more reliable imo. The board seem to understand that they are running the business for the shareholders. Paying a divi is a good dicipline for a company too imo. Another pre-requisite for the tread is UK based stocks as opposed to overseas. In my experience AIM stocks based in China and the far East, India, Italy, Israel, Italy, Greece, and the US have higher liklihood of warning and are more prone to directors getting up to no good. By selecting UK based divi payers on AIM I think we have the opportunity to filter out 90% of the stocks that are likely to disappoint on AIM imo. WARNING - many of these share sare illiquid and hard to deal in size. At times it may be fdifficult to buy or sell anything over the normal market size (which may be just 1-2K shares) without paying a premium or accepting a discount to mkt on your sale. Please feel free to suggest any you have and discuss them here. If you provide the following I'll place a stock in the header - remember as tghe price changes so does the PE and yield so the numbers below will start to go out of date. a) ticker b) one liner on what they do c) most recent divi or intention to pay divi declaration. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I'm trying to find aim stocks with growth and momentum here so to prevent every AIM divi payer being posted here the criteria are: AIM UK based Divi Payer Share price above the 100 day moving average. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To begin with I'll add: JDG - a scientific equipment manufacturer. Fast growing, up 8 fold in 3 years - 5p divi at the interims today. TRCS - supplier of management software to rail companies. 0.2p interim divi. GTC - provider of gravity and magnetic data, services and geological studies to the petroleum and mining industries to assist in their exploration activities0.2p final divi to be paid with the year end results due in October. LPA electronic and LED component suppler/manufacturer. 0.5p div paid at the interims. GOOD - supplier of green energy - interim divi 1p. DRV provider of commercial and dispute resolution services to the construction industry - interim divi 0.3p IDOX - supply of information and knowledge management products and services interim divi 0.275p RGS - outsourcing partner - announced starting to pay dividend today. P/e 6, PEG .6. Negative is low margin business. HGV online marketing and advertising. Full year divi doubled at year end - 2p eps in H1 this year. POWR - Finnish papemill PE 8.6, Yield 4.45%. FRP - personal debt solutions, Interim divi 1.95p ANP - Feed additives, 2.4p divi TFW Lighting manufacturer - 1.9% yield FFY Fruit importer £132.28 cap, 3.76% Div, 8.5 P/E BRT - Brightside 1.7% yield, Car insurance and associated gubbins. Pe 8 RNWH 3.4% yield, Engineering / Construction, Pe 8 SSP, 3.4% yield, Electronic parts / hardware, Pe 11 ZYT, 2.6% yield, Touch screens etc, Pe 15 JIM - retail stockbroker 5.67% yield RIG - Rig Finance, 3.72% yield (Dual Listed, ISA-able) PHSC - Health and safety and environmental - diversifying - 4.17% yield CNKS - corporate broking and advisory, circa 7% yield ISG - interior fittings for business, yield near 7%. RQIH - insurance management services, 7.6% yield UFG - factoring and trade finance, 4.4% yield GDP, gold/Plat producer, PE circa 7, 3%+ yield ------------------- ">">"> ">">"> ">">"> ">">"> ">">"> ">">"> ">">">
10/9/2008
15:24
yikyak: September 08, 2008 A Toothless Market That Offers No Liquidity And Locks Its Directors Out - Just What Exactly Is The Point Of An Aim Listing? By Alastair Ford What is it with the Aim regulators? Are they blind, ignorant or simply somnolent? To many it seems that amid the summer's conflagration of valuation all the Aim authorities did was fiddle while the market burned. It may be more to do with the market itself, of course - structurally flawed, the regulators are powerless to make a difference. One way or another, resources companies listed on Aim took a beating over the summer. And the whole year hasn't exactly been a bed of roses. Of course, it hasn't been easy elsewhere either. The Toronto market sank under a deadweight of disinterest this summer too, and after some tentative steadying of the ship over the last couple of weeks, is now waiting nervously to see what autumn has in store. The picture's not been too much better in Australia, although overall it's to Australia that most of the surviving near-term bulls seem to have migrated. Across the globe, weaker commodities prices and the wider withdrawal of cash from equities in general has hit hard, but on Aim the crunch was especially pronounced. Two factors really put the squeeze on. One is the structure of the market itself, and the way trades in most Aim-traded junior companies go through the market maker system rather than being settled on a matched-bargain basis. This is a question of a liquidity, the perennial weakness of Aim, but one that has looked particularly pronounced this summer. And regulators take note: one that is far less of a problem in Toronto and Sydney. When juniors in Canada complain of thin trading, they do not mean no trades at all for days on end. The second factor is that those in charge of Aim have little or no understanding of junior resources companies. This has several ramifications, including a constant befuddlement on the market's part as to what constitutes price sensitive information. No-one at Aim really seems to have worked that one out, so the consequence is that virtually any information is deemed price sensitive. In fact, and especially this year, not much has moved markets, not in the way of company-specific information anyway. You only have to track newsflow against volume for a company like African Eagle to know that whatever good news the company had was released into an indifferent market. In recent years London's junior market has gone global, marketing in all sorts of glamorous and exotic overseas locations. It's managed to pull in listings from all around the world. But the real success has been in resources companies, in mining and oil & gas, and particularly those from Australia and Canada, with a few from the USA and elsewhere thrown in for good measure. The attraction for these companies is the vast pool of capital that the City has access to. Regulators take note: it's the City's money that interests these companies, not the Aim market per se. Many City institutions, especially the generalist funds, want a local listing, and that means Aim. Good for the Aim market, but not so good for the companies concerned, as Aim's inability to draw in any retail interest means that unless the market is constantly drip-fed, the trading pressure is almost always on the downside because there just isn't much interest – and it doesn't matter how good the story. The way it works is as follows: a company lists on Aim, raising a certain number of millions of pounds from institutions along the way. Those institutions will have heard the company's story in a pre-listing roadshow, and will surely have liked that story if they've put money in. They will, therefore, not be particularly disposed to sell any shares once the listing gets away, although the early seed money and the hedge funds do sometimes take profits. More likely though, a small resources company listing on Aim will be viewed by those funds that take a favourable stance as a "buy and hold", to be tucked away until some really big news comes along. So far so good. The problem comes when anyone actually wants to trade the shares. Where are these shares supposed to come from? Who's marketed to the general punter who ought to be relied upon to drive volume? The answer is: no-one. And where's the volume? There isn't any. It's the same old story. And there aren't many other places to go. Directors often have sizeable stakes, but for reasons we'll get onto in a minute, aren't often in a position to trade. The institutions don't want to sell, especially into a market where there's so little volume that a major transaction will trash the share price at a stroke. Easy as ABC, a liquidity vacuum is built into the heart of the structure of the Aim market. Canada and Australia don't have this problem for the simple reason that retail and small-time investors are actually encouraged to buy in. In Canada and Australia the small time punters drive the volume and the price, while the institutions bide their time, sitting on profits or losses as the case may be. Not so in London, where brokers aren't allowed to market companies to anyone outside their own specific client base, anyone, in short, who isn't something called a "sophisticated investor". The catch with that is that by definition an existing client base is already in the market. Getting new buyers in is therefore something that market regulations effectively block. So Aim has its own self-inflicted liquidity problem. How to get around this? The answer is the market maker system. This is actually in theory the perfect solution for Aim, in that the junior market ends up licensing other people to make a market within a market. The idea is that market makers build a book in a company's shares, which they then price up with a bid-ask spread that ensures they can make a little bit for their own trouble. Any investor going into the market will then find instant volume in the form of the market maker's book. The more market makers, the more competitive the spreads, and so efficiency is regained even in the face of general illiquidity. But the practical reality reveals several drawbacks. First, market makers don't always like to build their own book, especially in markets like these when they may well be sitting on lots of shares that nobody wants. As Aim grew it was intriguing to watch the number of market makers grow too. In theory that was even better for volume, as they would compete on price, and so spreads would narrow. But in fact they now mark their prices to match each other, and if one slashes prices in order to find a buyer, instead of hoovering up stock in order to pass on to their own customers, all the other market makers slash prices too, for the simple reason that they don't have any customers. So if anyone does come into buy, a market maker will often find, contrary to the original idea, that it's necessary to go out into the market to secure shares to fulfil the order. And the way to secure those shares is to mark the price up dramatically enough to attract someone else in. Likewise with a sell order: the price is marked down and down and down, until the shares are so ridiculously cheap that some "sophisticated" bargain hunter can't resist. Hence extreme share price volatility on virtually no trading. Hence, killer spreads. And that doesn't make anyone feel relaxed. Directors, of course, can usually be relied upon to buy shares. Investors want to see their directors backing their own companies, and directors, to their credit, tend to want to back them. When directors do move into the market, the impact can be immediate, as director buying instils confidence, and gives the market makers something to work with. But the Aim regulators are less sure it's a good idea. Minesite carried out an unscientific, but fairly extensive, survey of directors of Aim-traded resources companies, and found a high degree of frustration about reporting requirements and allied restrictions on directors' dealings. One director commented - perhaps inadvertently summing up the whole mentality of the regulators - that the rules are set up in such a way as to assume a director is guilty until proven innocent. Thus directors have their hands tied for much of the calendar year, prevented either from buying or selling shares in their own companies by what's termed a "closed period", an arbitrary two month ban on trading shares ahead of a given set of financial results, be they interims or finals. Directors are also, rightly in the opinion of virtually all that were surveyed here, restricted from trading when they have access to price sensitive information. But the irony for Aim's resources companies is that financial results are generally not price sensitive, since the majority of companies are explorers and will book a loss every time. What is price sensitive are the results of drilling or other exploratory activities. And since these activities are the meat and drink of explorers and are ongoing most of the year, directors are locked out once again. This matters, for several reasons. From Aim's point of view, the restrictions are much more onerous than they are in Australia, where the rules sensibly focus simply on price sensitive information, and don't lock directors out of the market for long arbitrary periods ahead of financials that have no material impact. Many Australian company directors are sick of Aim's restrictions, because of course it means they are locked out of their own market too, while directors of their non dual-listed peers can, with far greater frequency, support their companies. Lots of Australians are considering de-listing from Aim. Tianshan Gold has already gone. More may follow. One problem is that the restrictions on directors' dealing are not widely known. Investors find it bemusing that company directors don't go into the market to prop up an ailing share price, and often get on the phone to demand an explanation. All in a day's work for a director, you may say, and you'd be right. But the net result is that you're left with an unhappy investor and an unhappy director. Again, not great for the Aim market when it's competing on a global stage. So we come back to the simple fact that the Aim regulators don't understand resources companies. Another company director comments succinctly, that "the only financial number of materiality for exploration companies is cash in the bank". Broadly speaking that's true. Investors need to know if a company can afford to keep exploring, and if not, how long it's got before the sharks start circling. The profit and loss account bears little relevance. Even less a cash flow statement. In light of this, many directors feel that a reduction of the close period, by, say, a half, to one month, would be a sensible move. It's to be doubted whether the Aim authorities will take note, however, or even understand the argument. Back in the day, the London stock exchange used to employ a dedicated resources specialist to oversee companies trading in London, but also, crucially, to provide a voice for them at the regulatory table. But that was long before the current boom got going. The stock exchange does say it has somebody on post, but no-one knows who it is. Or if there is anyone, what they do. Now and again if there is a transgression of the rules, Aim does call in a panel of so-called Wise Men to advise it. These Wise Men like to keep their identities under wraps, partly, one suspects, because although the advice they dispense is indeed wise, it's not always acted upon. Thus, in the recent shenanigans involving Meridian Petroleum, although consulted, the Wise Men were given such limited scope for action that they served as little more than a rubber stamp for the wrap over the knuckles that Aim eventually dished out to Meridian. So, it's hardly a regime with teeth. Which is probably another reason why directors suffer from so many restrictions, under the old totalitarian maxim that if you prevent people from doing anything, you are also preventing wrong-doing along the way. Nevertheless, the directors that Minesite consulted did have some sympathy with the market's predicament. No-one wants their shares trading on a shonky market with a reputation for dodgy dealings. So several suggestions were proffered, the most popular one being, as mentioned above, a shortening of the close period to one month. Other helpful ideas for the Aim authorities to consider included a special dispensation to trade to be given by the market on application, and on the assurance that all price-sensitive information was already out in the market. One director suggested some sort of tie-in with Germany, possibly through Euronext, where the retail interest is much greater, and the liquidity issue could be tackled head on. Another suggested that directors could have their share dealing accounts locked in escrow for a given period in order to ensure that trading wasn't just occurring ahead of specific, as-yet undisclosed events. All of which goes to show that Aim isn't dead in the water yet. The number of new listings may have dried up, but there is plenty of willingness to try to make this market work, through the bad times as well as the good. But let's hope that the powers-that-be wake up and realise what an asset its stable of resources companies is – before it's too late. http://www.minesite.com/nc/minews/singlenews/article/a-toothless-market-that-offers-no-liquidity-and-locks-its-directors-out-just-what-exactly-is-the-p/1.html
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