Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tullow Oil LSE:TLW London Ordinary Share GB0001500809 ORD 10P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -4.80p -2.15% 218.10p 218.40p 218.70p 223.70p 215.90p 221.30p 8,443,316 16:35:12
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 1,028.4 -735.6 -53.3 - 3,021.77

Tullow Oil Share Discussion Threads

Showing 35826 to 35850 of 35850 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
18/1/2018
21:16
Not sure about an extended drop, seemed to bounce back off 216p again for the nth time, will be interesting to see what happens.
romeike
18/1/2018
16:16
The Deepwater Cape Three Points (DWCTP) Block has been relinquished twice by Vanco Energy and Lukoil which has increased the risk profile of the Block. Some 3d done over it. It in Ultra Deep water south of Jubilee.-150km 0ffshore
billy_buffin
18/1/2018
15:09
near to us? https://uk.advfn.com/stock-market/NYSE/XOM/share-news/Exxon-Mobil-Acquires-Exploration-Acreage-Offshore/76502558
eipgam
18/1/2018
08:15
[...] Exploration partners Tullow Oil plc (LON:TLW) and Eco (Atlantic) Oil & Gas Ltd (LON:ECO, CVE:EOG) have decided to take forward the Orinduik project, offshore Guyana, into Phase Two of its licence. It means the partners are committing to a new programme of seismic exploration, to gather at least 1,000 square kilometres of 3D data, though this work has actually already been undertaken (with some 2,550 square kilometres of data captured in September). Presently, Tullow Oil has a 60% stake in the venture alongside Eco with 40%, but, a new tie-up deal agreed in September gave French oil major Total an option to acquire a 25% stake in Orinduik from Eco. Colin Kinley, Eco chief operating officer, in a statement said that the entry to Phase Two endorses the belief in the potential of the Orinduik Block. "We are delighted to enter into Phase Two on Orinduik. We have completed and significantly exceeded our 3D seismic requirements for Phase Two already during Phase One,” he said. “The initial phase of processing is nearing completion. Once we are satisfied with the data at that stage, we will supply it to Total for their review under their option agreement. “While the precise date is yet to be determined by the partners, an announcement will be made at that time and the companies will begin working together on the interpretation and selection of well targets.” Kinley added: “This has also recently been strengthened by ExxonMobil's sixth discovery on the adjacent Stabroek Block, Ranger-1, which is now increases Exxon's estimated to total more than 3.2 billion recoverable oil-equivalent barrels on the Block."
oilretire
18/1/2018
04:39
api was good, Brent 69.56 TLW should move back up to the 230s today?
paulbiya
17/1/2018
16:03
Oil same price as yesterday so why the drop? :(
alfiex
17/1/2018
11:09
Similar, taken some off the table, found uen, 8 million mkt cap and 2000 bopd production. Up almost 50 percent last week or so. I think some of the big cap gains are rolling into the smaller ones. Jkx also on the move
gregpeck7
17/1/2018
10:18
Sold out, looking like a general sell off is due
mercer95
17/1/2018
10:17
Final results published on 7/2/2018. We know about the cash and the selling of oil but what we don't know is profit or loss as this will make headlines. Much will depend if they can book a profit or loss on the farm down in Uganda or not and that may in turn depend if they can seal the deal pre 7/2/2018. Be good if they can book a profit. Share may re-rate when they receive the $160m from Uganda.
mariopeter
17/1/2018
09:22
Cfb2, I'm in the same boat. I thought you were speculating that car would be used by the grid as distributed storage units. My point was, if for example EVs became widely popular in the states there would more likely be more brownouts etc as the grid couldn't cope with demand. Yes batteries would be great for wind generators but they're not being used yet and I can't envisage state electricity companies moving rapidly to battery tech, meaning I also see increased oil demand but am cautious into the future (after 2018).
mcsean2164
17/1/2018
07:39
Total declared shorts now at 5.40% caused by two funds dropping below 0.5% declaration threshold.
argylerich
16/1/2018
19:55
mcsean: I'm quite heavily invested in Tullow as I have a similar belief to mariopeter. Shipping locally made electricity back to the grid in my opinion is silly. Unless you significantly up the voltage all that happens is you heat up the power cables in the transfer, much better to store it locally in batteries for when you need it. I've been lurking on this thread for ages but there are more knowledgeable people posting here so not really much to add on Tullow. Trading statement was good though. I know there was some selling on the news but I'm guessing some of that was on technical grounds, the RSI having moved into overbought territory.
cfb2
16/1/2018
18:31
cfb2, So far little or nothing has happened. Yes, if it's easy to sell back to the grid that would help but to date operators haven't made it easy...
mcsean2164
16/1/2018
16:24
The world is expected to consume oil witha 50% increase in demand by 2050 that's 150 mbopd even accounting for electric cars. End of oil is one of those old slogans that has been around for decades.
mariopeter
16/1/2018
15:57
Different technologies for different problems. Vanadium flow batteries or VRBs are relevant to storing large amounts of energy in power stations. They are large for the amount of energy they store but have good charging characteristics and a lifetime around 25 years. Lithium are compact and difficult to charge quickly and have a lifetime around 10 years (although their maximum storage capacity drops after a couple of years depending on how they have been charged). If energy storage is centralised in power stations and storage stations then VRBs are the way to go. If energy storage becomes highly distributed then Lithium is the way to go. If EVs become the norm then one form of distributed energy storage will be in the car's battery.
cfb2
16/1/2018
15:19
Yes there is - Vanadium flow batteries. New to commercialisation but the noise is getting louder each month. The largest battery in the world isn't a Lithium one as Elon a Musk would have you believe but a Vanadium flow battery in China. Market is growing bigger month on month and our very own UK company Redt Energy (RED) is at the forefront of the industry.
cheek212
16/1/2018
14:44
mp, totally agree, the only spanner I can see is a massive take off in EV's and I gotta ask if all vehicles were EV (less efficient that petrol) where would the electricity come from? There's still no storage for wind/ solar.
mcsean2164
16/1/2018
14:17
Marshall and Linden lumping on the shorts. Typical.
nicebut
16/1/2018
10:46
The rest of the world is expected to start drilling at $65/70 a barrel except they haven't being doing their homework for 3 years.
mariopeter
16/1/2018
10:12
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/12/cheap-crude-oil-over-for-now-trader-robert-raymond-says.html
mariopeter
16/1/2018
10:01
This is the crux of the oil market. Shale v Opec. All I can see is US shale struggling and I just have to point to US oil production levels to demonstrate that....why are they still below 10 mbopd? Relentless world demand is supposed to increase by 1.5 mbopd over 2017 levels and even that's conservative. US shale output, to keep up, would need to produce 11 mbopd TODAY. The EIA have told us that this will not happen US oil output until the end of 2019. Meantime back at the ranch in 2018 we have a world oil shortage because (with the exception of Nigeria and maybe a tad from Libya) no one is producing more oil. Any small supply hiccup has and will continue to push up prices. Don't be too surprised if we at $100 oil by the US driving season (or the Aramco float) when the maths has played out.
mariopeter
16/1/2018
01:24
Mike says: 12/16/2017 AT 8:56 PM I think we now have a better understanding of each other’s “opinions̶1; about the role that shale oil will play in America’s energy future. You are not adverse to debt, I am. I am able to see how severe the financial situation is for the American shale oil industry, your not. hxxps://www.peakprosperity.com/blog/113557/great-oil-swindle. The American shale oil industry is two hundred billion dollars in debt and now forced to manage that debt with wells that produce less than 25 BOPD. And, as Chris implies in his article, not sufficient reserves to cover that debt. That is a disaster in the making. That will not improve with some wishful thinking about $100 oil. “Life may go on.” if the shale oil industry fails, but your predictions won’t. Debt is not “fine, and it is particularly not fine for an industry whose assets decline 45% the first 3 years, then 12-15% per year thereafter.
mcsean2164
15/1/2018
21:52
Worth bearing in mind perhaps the reason not much conventional oil was discovered was a major diversion of exploration capital away from conventional and into resource plays! Does it matter we only discovered 7 bn bbl conventional globally when there's 20bn, 30bn or 50bn bbls (or whatever the number is) sitting in the Permian, waiting to be tapped without much geological risk? Even Shell who've been somewhat agnostic are now waxing lyrical about shale. OK, there's probably gonna be some bottlenecks with fracking crews, or sand, or water etc at various points, but given the rate of technological progress over the years, solutions will likely be found to keep the momentum going. I kind of think "Shale" has OPEC over a barrel - at least for the next five years or so.
xxnjr1
15/1/2018
18:45
The U.S. shale resurgence has been one of the main themes in oil markets this year, while OPEC’s production cut deal to deplete the oil overhang and boost oil prices has been the other key development in 2017. U.S. shale production is expected to grow over the next few years as the companies that survived the worst of the downturn showed resilience in the face of the lower-for-longer oil prices. But three years of low oil prices also led to the global oil industry slashing investments in conventional oil exploration, and deferring or revisiting development plans. This has led to the lowest ever volumes of oil discoveries in 2017, Rystad Energy said last week. While the low level of discoveries is not an immediate threat to global oil supply, it could become such ten years down the road, according to Rystad Energy. In ten years’ time, U.S. shale production may have peaked, at least according to OPEC that sees shale peaking after 2025, although the cartel has conceded that U.S. tight oil has defied previous forecasts and has increased production more than initially expected and will continue to do so in the short term. This year has seen less than 7 billion barrels of oil equivalent discovered globally, a volume as low as last seen in the 1940s, Rystad Energy has estimated. What worries analysts the most is the fact that this year the reserve replacement ratio—the amount of discovered resources relative to the amount of production—was a mere 11 percent, compared to 50 percent in 2012, Sonia Mladá Passos, Senior Analyst at Rystad Energy, said. htTps://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/US-Shale-Cant-Offset-Record-Low-Oil-Discoveries.html
celeritas
15/1/2018
18:07
Just goes to show that shale doesn't last forever. Over 50% more wells and less volumes, huge debts associated with shale companies etc.
mcsean2164
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