Ted Baker Investors - TED

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Stock Name Stock Symbol Market Stock Type Stock ISIN Stock Description
Ted Baker Plc TED London Ordinary Share GB0001048619 ORD 5P
  Price Change Price Change % Stock Price Last Trade
-6.50 -4.02% 155.00 16:35:02
Open Price Low Price High Price Close Price Previous Close
162.20 149.00 166.60 155.00 161.50
more quote information »
Industry Sector
GENERAL RETAILERS

Top Investor Posts

DateSubject
25/3/2021
09:15
luddenden7: you sound like a very disgruntled investor who's clearly been caught in many wrong investments. Buy high, sell low? If you look beneath the surface there are many good quality, growth stocks in the UK, some industry leaders. Why is the UK (outside of the US) the largest exposure for Fundsmith if your comments are correct?
11/2/2021
08:59
luddenden7: Morgan Stanley, Price target £1.40 Ted Baker has issued its FYQ4 trading statement this morning. The trading figure is very weak, but this should not come as too much of a surprise to the market. However given the outlook commentary we would not be surprised to see FY 2021/22 PBT consensus forecasts fall following today. - Group revenues in FYQ4 were down 47% for the 13 weeks to the end of January. When Ted Baker updated the market in December, it reported group revenues down 37% for the 4 weeks to 28 November, and so this implies a material deterioration since then. Though, this should not be a surprise to investors given the various lockdowns that have been reimposed. Indeed Bloomberg consensus was anticipating revenues down 46% for the full year, broadly in-line with the full year revenue figure reported today. - Encouragingly Ted Baker had £67m of cash on its balance sheet at the end of January (versus £59m as of 28th November) and its £133m of bank facilities remain undrawn. Management has also commented that it expects to have "material liquidity headroom" ahead of the peak in its working capital cycle in Autumn of this year. - Ted Baker has not provided explicit PBT guidance today for FY 2020/21 or for FY 2021/22. It does cite, though, that it anticipates for Retail and Wholesale "an ongoing materially negative impact across both channels from store closures until end May 2021, followed by a phased recovery until the end of the first half". It also adds that it expects to see up to £5m of extra costs related to Brexit. According to Bloomberg, prior to today, consensus was anticipating PBT of -£62m in FY 2020/21 and £6m in FY 2021/22. We would not be surprised to see FY 2021/22 forecasts coming down materially following today given the commentary.
16/11/2020
13:14
nobilis: But in the economy that emerges from the ruins, there will be big winners, and investors are frenziedly trying to pick them.”
23/10/2020
16:31
john09: Or i could be a liar Thankfully none of the above. Just a private investor who understand charting, momentum and sentiment .
06/10/2020
10:06
lucicavi: A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.â€� This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund managerâ€͐2;s words, a “dog’s breakfast of itâ€�. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,â€ᦙ3; said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “Heâ364;™s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.â€ᦙ3; He added that there was “nothing wrong with the businessâ€A533; now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,â€5533; Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.â€A533; He said Superdryâ€T82;s “reasonably priced casual wearâ€� put it “in the right placeâ€�; as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,â€� he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.â€ʏ33; He said Superdry charged “premium pricesâ€ᦙ3; but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.â€ᦙ3; The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,â€ᦙ3; Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddledâ€ʏ33; because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,â€�; he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.â€ᦙ3; Questor
10/9/2020
15:13
onjohn: 0 0 1 By Richard Evans 9 September 2020 • 5:00am A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.” This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund manager’s words, a “dog’s breakfast of it”. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,” said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “He’s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.” He added that there was “nothing wrong with the business” now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,” Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.” He said Superdry’s “reasonably priced casual wear” put it “in the right place” as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,” he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.” He said Superdry charged “premium prices” but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.” The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,” Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddled” because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,” he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.” Questor
09/9/2020
16:06
onjohn: By Richard Evans 9 September 2020 • 5:00am A woman walks past a Superdry fashion store in Berlin, Germany Reasonably priced casual wear puts Superdry in the right place for the pandemic “These guys destroyed a quarter of a billion pounds of value for me and I’m determined to build it back up.” This is what, according to one fund manager, the founder of Superdry is in effect saying about his attempt to restore the firm’s fortunes after his predecessors made, again in the fund manager’s words, a “dog’s breakfast of it”. Liad Meidar of Gatemore Capital Management, whose Special Opportunities fund has a stake in the fashion brand, said Julian Dunkerton, its founder, had seen the value of his Superdry shares fall by about £250m when its market value plummeted from £1.3bn to £90m under the previous management. This obviously gives Mr Dunkerton plenty of motivation to succeed – and it shows. “He fought to get back control of the company in April last year. There was lot of drama,” said Mr Meidar. “We think he is doing a lot of the right things to get the business back on track. “He’s just as energetic and committed as before. He is a really incredible entrepreneur. He is renegotiating store leases, so fixed costs are falling significantly, and he is revamping the product line, breathing new life into it. And I think he’ll be around for a while.” He added that there was “nothing wrong with the business” now. “Going into the pandemic there were a lot of factors that put it in a unique position,” Mr Meidar added. “One was it had net cash, a position that it managed to maintain into lockdown. It had had too much inventory but stopped purchasing and managed to clear it, while the warehouses for online shopping were kept running.” He said Superdry’s “reasonably priced casual wear” put it “in the right place” as far as the pandemic was concerned. “This brand can do really well in this environment,” he added. “It was already in turnaround mode going into Covid – it was on the front foot. “Now it is able to go further and get its cost structure right. For example, some shops could be closed but the firm could also open some new ones. Some landlords are offering variable-cost deals that in effect mean there is no risk for the tenant.” He said Superdry charged “premium prices” but still offered good value for money. “You feel that you are getting a good deal, a good balance of quality and price.” The result is gross margins of about 64pc. Returns on capital tend to be in double digits, although they are depressed this year. “They could go into the high teens,” Mr Meidar said. He said profit numbers were currently “all muddled” because of changes to accounting standards but the less volatile and arguably more important free cash flow figure should be more than £60m by 2022. “A business with a market value of £110m is on course to produce £60m in cash in one year,” he said. “That reflects the bombed-out share price, which has arisen partly because some investors ‘short sold’ retailers. “This is the type of opportunity we want. There are very few risk-reward stories like this out there.” Questor says: buy Ticker: SDRY
22/6/2020
10:51
cjohn: 20-21 Year end debt likely to be negligible, assuming loss of no more than £20-30m. May do a few million "underlying" profit; but that's with a market cap of around £180m. Current PTBV is 1.8. So assuming inventory is not going to be written down or off again, balance sheet looks OK, but doesn't offer any positive value. Investors with a good knowledge of the apparel trade may be able to discern value. I have no such expertise, so will duck this one, unless it gets a lot cheaper.
18/6/2020
14:38
1nf3rn0: By number applied for, I meant in total - open offer plus excess. Our figures align regarding the excess portion. Although I believe not all online brokers will scale back in the same proportion... from what I understand it depends how many open offer and excess shares the pool of their eligible customers applied for in total versus other investors and brokers. On average though it should be as you've calculated.
01/4/2020
10:01
sam_: True dealy but I don't think things are gloomy in Ted if we take into account the business rates holiday in 2020,interest free government support available for retailers, increasing the headroom banking facilities by GBP13.5 million till the end of this year, selling the head office for GBP 78.75 million which represents a premium of approximately 39.1% of the book value, government paying 80% of the salaries & office staff cut last month(120 employees & eCommerce growth, especially overseas. All of the above and other factors which we personal investors aren't aware put Ted on several wealth management firms radar and yesterday's RNS is a good example. Stocks with a low float and low market-cap tend to be volatile and can make huge moves to the upside very quickly if they succeeded in attracting new institutional investors interest.
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