Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tax Systems LSE:TAX London Ordinary Share GB00BDHLGB97 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 78.00p 76.00p 80.00p 78.00p 78.00p 78.00p 0 07:39:08
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Retailers 5.8 -4.0 -9.8 - 59.28

Tax Systems Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1451 to 1473 of 1475 messages
Chat Pages: 59  58  57  56  55  54  53  52  51  50  49  48  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
16/10/2017
06:42
Https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/economy/news/89822/philip-hammond-mulling-age-tax-bid-address-intergenerational-fairness%E2%80%99
waldron
09/10/2017
19:35
HTTPS://www.accountingweb.co.uk/tax/hmrc-policy/partial-fix-for-tax-return-filing-problems?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=AWUKTAX091017&utm_content=AWUKTAX09
pvb
09/10/2017
16:44
Https://www.accountancylive.com/cch_uk/cln/news_004709_recognising_bogus_emails
waldron
08/10/2017
07:28
Http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tax/inheritance/trump-looks-axe-death-duties-does-britain-stand-inheritance/
sarkasm
23/9/2017
06:52
Two million couples lose £662 windfall by failing to claim marriage tax break 0 Millions of married couples are missing out on a tax break Credit: Alamy Sam Meadows 23 September 2017 • 7:03am Millions of married couples are missing out on as much as £662 because they are not claiming recently introduced tax breaks. Figures released by HMRC under the Freedom of Information Act show that, while take-up is growing, around two million couples are missing out on the “marriage allowance”, which was introduced in 2015. The allowance applies to married couples, and those in civil partnerships, where one partner is a basic-rate, 20pc, taxpayer and the other is not paying tax. Paid content This Japanese Woman Changed the Game for Kenyan Soybean Farmers This Japanese Woman Changed the Game for Kenyan Soybean Farmers We Are Tomodachi by JAPAN GOV German business fires first salvo against Trumpism German business fires first salvo against Trumpism Handelsblatt Global Recommended by It allows the non-taxpayer, who must be earning less than £11,500 a year, to transfer up to £1,150 of their unused tax-free allowance to their other half. PUBLICITÉ At current rates the tax break is worth £230 per couple per year, but the claim can be backdated for the past two financial years, saving you £662 in total. Uptake has risen from in 644,916 people in 2015-16 to 2.2 million this year. When the policy was introduced HMRC estimated that 4.2 million couples would be eligible, meaning there are still 2 million people failing to claim. That means families are collectively missing out on £1.3bn. Steve Webb, director at insurer Royal London, which conducted the research, said: “The take-up of the new allowance is shockingly low. Even in its third year of operation, around two million couples who could benefit from the marriage allowance are not doing so. “When family finances are so tight, I would encourage every married couple to check whether they might be eligible, including for the past two years, as they could qualify for a useful lump sum as well as a reduction in their ongoing tax bill.” Couples can apply for the allowance online and will need to provide a National Insurance number for both partners as well as another form of ID from a given list. You can backdate your claim to when the allowance was introduced in 2015, but to be eligible for previous years you must satisfy the criteria at the time. This means the lower earner must have been earning less than £11,000 last year and £10,600 the year before, and the higher earner must have been a basic-rate taxpayer for all the years they are claiming for. Couples have up to four years to claim backdated allowances. HMRC said earlier this year it has stepped up its marketing campaign to ensure people do not miss out. The marriage allowance will automatically renew every year until you stop it, or your circumstances change, due to death or divorce, for example. Cohabiting couples miss out regardless of how long they have been together, as do couples where one is a higher-rate, 40pc, taxpayer. If the lowest earner brings in more than the tax-free personal allowance they also miss out as only unused allowances can be transferred.
sarkasm
18/9/2017
21:08
goatherd, many thanks, I will look at this, it would make life a lot easier, cheers.
royaloak
18/9/2017
10:57
royaloak, You can always attach a spreadsheet to an online return. In your sort of circumstances I would prepare the spreadsheet and then include the totals in one or two lines (business & "non-business") of CGT return. I have done this sort of thing in the past and never had a query!
goatherd
17/9/2017
21:00
Many thanks MoneyMan18, yes it is sad, as you say it comes to us all, but nice to know that helpful people are appreciated and remembered.
royaloak
17/9/2017
19:56
Sadly I believe all the evidence points to him having a heart attack and that's the end, a sadly missed poster, It will happen to us all in the end.
moneyman18
17/9/2017
19:35
What happened to miata, I remeber him now, he and Gengulphus were incredibly helpful.
royaloak
17/9/2017
19:33
Thanks guys, goatherd I also do a lot of cfd trading, and think that could be difficult to report online. I know I could use spread bets but prefer CFD's with direct market access. Mind as I get older I need to cut back on my short term trading, so maybe that will be the first to go so I can do online1 waldron, Paphos in Cyprus, around 2006 I was incredibly lucky with my investments and I was going to move to Cyprus as there is no CGT there and then take profits, but because of my wife's health problems at the time I was unable to move, and I ended up paying a massive amount in tax, such is life but as I said I was lucky so no complaints. One of the shares I held was Hornby which I had started to buy in 2001, it was a multibagger, I had others that did really well, most with a speculative element so I could not afford the risk of keeping them...look at Hornby now1 Hence I ended up with a property in Cyprus.
royaloak
17/9/2017
15:57
nice to see a helpful post becoming rare these days thumbs up for you goatherd enjoy the coming week miata would have awarded brownie points i am sure cheers
waldron
17/9/2017
15:45
royaloak, Or until the end of January if you file on line! Personally I think it is much easier than on paper (much of the information is remembered from previous years, as a start; all the calculations are done for you, there is copious help available at the touch of a button) and I would suggest it is worth the effort of trying it out, possibly in parallel with paper for the first year. I do wonder whether paper will cease to be an option in due course.
goatherd
17/9/2017
13:52
good luck your highness just out of interest where abroad
waldron
17/9/2017
12:50
Thanks david and waldron, much appreciated, box 47 was staring me in the face, I think it's because thay had altered the format completely that threw me. Almost everything I have is traded in ISA's now, but the longer term shares I had are still in none ISA's and I am dripping these out accordingly. Mind I am also a bit shell shocked dealing with my return on a property I own abroad, which had until the end of the year been rented out for several years to one tenant only. When he left I switched to Holiday Lets and that from a tax perspective has also thrown up a few problems for me. Next year should be fine. Luckily I have till the end of October for my paper return! Thanks again guys.
royaloak
17/9/2017
11:31
Https://www.gov.uk/capital-gains-tax/losses
waldron
17/9/2017
10:08
SA108 page CG3 box 47 2016-17 - other information 47 Losses available to be carried forward That's where I put my massive losses carried forward. I am not qualified to advise.
david77
17/9/2017
09:34
Not sure if Gengulphus now posts on this thread, from memory I know he was one of the experts on capital gains tax, so would appreciate it if he other others would comment. Most of my investments are now in ISA's so I do not have to worry about CG's. However I have losses brought forward from many years ago that I record each year on my tax return. This year, 2016 / 2017 return the form has changed completly and I cannot see where to record losses brought forward. Any ideas folks? Many thanks. ps I do the paper return.
royaloak
06/9/2017
12:57
HHttp://www.international-adviser.com/news/1037919/hmrc-deadline-pushed-trusts-tax-planning-register
waldron
19/7/2017
13:32
Http://www.moneyobserver.com/news/19-07-2017/dividend-tax-allowance-cut-to-hit-90000-investors
sarkasm
05/7/2017
20:59
I bought today mainly based on the chart pattern. Over the years I have noticed when a recently floated share drifts down for several months, and then rises above the closing price of the first trading day, it will have a very good run. Often they continue to go up anything between 50-100%.A recent example of such chart pattern is Angus Energy, and another one is Forterra.
rafieh
05/7/2017
15:40
Hi Hastings, any chance of a few share price charts in the header?
dorset64
05/7/2017
15:23
Certainly doesn't TP, I thought I had missed some news!Still all that chunky recurring revenue is decent, ahead of hopefully some new business.Nicely under the radar for now.
hastings
Chat Pages: 59  58  57  56  55  54  53  52  51  50  49  48  Older
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