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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Tax Systems LSE:TAX London Ordinary Share GB00BDHLGB97 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 112.50 - 0.00 00:00:00
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Retailers 15.1 -1.9 -0.6 - 98

Tax Systems Share Discussion Threads

Showing 1501 to 1523 of 1725 messages
Chat Pages: 69  68  67  66  65  64  63  62  61  60  59  58  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
17/9/2017
15:57
nice to see a helpful post becoming rare these days thumbs up for you goatherd enjoy the coming week miata would have awarded brownie points i am sure cheers
waldron
17/9/2017
15:45
royaloak, Or until the end of January if you file on line! Personally I think it is much easier than on paper (much of the information is remembered from previous years, as a start; all the calculations are done for you, there is copious help available at the touch of a button) and I would suggest it is worth the effort of trying it out, possibly in parallel with paper for the first year. I do wonder whether paper will cease to be an option in due course.
goatherd
17/9/2017
13:52
good luck your highness just out of interest where abroad
waldron
17/9/2017
12:50
Thanks david and waldron, much appreciated, box 47 was staring me in the face, I think it's because thay had altered the format completely that threw me. Almost everything I have is traded in ISA's now, but the longer term shares I had are still in none ISA's and I am dripping these out accordingly. Mind I am also a bit shell shocked dealing with my return on a property I own abroad, which had until the end of the year been rented out for several years to one tenant only. When he left I switched to Holiday Lets and that from a tax perspective has also thrown up a few problems for me. Next year should be fine. Luckily I have till the end of October for my paper return! Thanks again guys.
royaloak
17/9/2017
11:31
Https://www.gov.uk/capital-gains-tax/losses
waldron
17/9/2017
10:08
SA108 page CG3 box 47 2016-17 - other information 47 Losses available to be carried forward That's where I put my massive losses carried forward. I am not qualified to advise.
david77
17/9/2017
09:34
Not sure if Gengulphus now posts on this thread, from memory I know he was one of the experts on capital gains tax, so would appreciate it if he other others would comment. Most of my investments are now in ISA's so I do not have to worry about CG's. However I have losses brought forward from many years ago that I record each year on my tax return. This year, 2016 / 2017 return the form has changed completly and I cannot see where to record losses brought forward. Any ideas folks? Many thanks. ps I do the paper return.
royaloak
06/9/2017
12:57
HHttp://www.international-adviser.com/news/1037919/hmrc-deadline-pushed-trusts-tax-planning-register
waldron
19/7/2017
13:32
Http://www.moneyobserver.com/news/19-07-2017/dividend-tax-allowance-cut-to-hit-90000-investors
sarkasm
05/7/2017
20:59
I bought today mainly based on the chart pattern. Over the years I have noticed when a recently floated share drifts down for several months, and then rises above the closing price of the first trading day, it will have a very good run. Often they continue to go up anything between 50-100%.A recent example of such chart pattern is Angus Energy, and another one is Forterra.
rafieh
05/7/2017
15:40
Hi Hastings, any chance of a few share price charts in the header?
dorset64
05/7/2017
15:23
Certainly doesn't TP, I thought I had missed some news!Still all that chunky recurring revenue is decent, ahead of hopefully some new business.Nicely under the radar for now.
hastings
05/7/2017
08:32
Doesn't take much buying to shift this north, think the shares are quite tightly held.
the prophet
05/7/2017
08:27
Still nice and quiet here, good to see a little tick up in the share price this morning though.
hastings
15/5/2017
16:45
Lovely big buy today
greenknight1
14/5/2017
16:25
Article last month from the well-respected TechMarketView web-site: The top management of this relative new-comer to AIM, headed by CEO Gavin Lyons (a partner of MXC Capital), had identified the market for the automation of Corporation Tax reporting as providing significant growth potential. As a result, a shell company (ECO City Vehicles plc) was used to buy Tax Computer Systems Ltd (TCSL) in July of last year and reverse it onto the public market as Tax Systems plc (AIM: TAX). TCSL had a long history in the business, an established software platform and broad UK customer base, as well as £12.8m of revenue in 2015 and an EBITDA margin consistently around the 50% level. The acquisition was transacted at an Enterprise Value of £73m. Today’s results show the performance of Tax Systems plc since the acquisition to the end of the calendar year. Revenue totalled £5.8m, with EBITDA of £2.7m. An operating loss of £3.2m and £0.8m of Finance charges drove a pre-tax loss of £4m. The company had net debt of £24m at the year end. Annual software licence sales totalled £5m, some 80% of the Group total. Management’s key next step was to buy Little British Battler OSMO, for its ability to extract data automatically from diverse accounting systems and to significantly alter the economics of building tax returns. (Corporation tax appears to get ever more complex and Brexit will probably make it even more so). This acquisition generates a significant element of differentiation as Tax Systems sets out to serve companies as they move to quarterly tax reporting and respond to the government’s policy of “Making Tax Digital” by 2020. Tax Systems’ goal is to provide end-to-end and substantially automated solutions for tax departments. With the progress already made, it seems to be building good foundations for an exciting future
the prophet
11/5/2017
10:49
Excellent article hastings. I've also bought into these, the high level of quality recurring revenue surely limits the down-side and with quality management on board looking to grow the business this looks a good opportunity to get in at a similar price to the float last year. This one is very much under the radar for now but I don't expect that situation to continue as growth comes through together with the possibility of earnings enhancing bolt on acquisitions. ps to hastings, could you add charts in the header please?
the prophet
10/5/2017
16:43
Thought I would kick off a thread for the company, which joined AIM last year following a reverse take over. Interview with CEO Gavin Lyons who was formerly at Accumuli. Http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/business/business-news/investment-opportunity-isnt-tax-ing-13013199
hastings
08/3/2017
13:57
Budget: Personal Allowance raised to £11,500; Higher Rate Tax threshold rises to £45,000; ISA Allowance rises to £20,000 Dividend Tax Allowance to be reduced from £5,000 to £2,000 from 6 April 2018.
pvb
04/3/2017
07:31
Http://www.publicfinance.co.uk/news/2017/03/council-tax-bills-set-biggest-increase-decade-cipfa-finds
ariane
25/2/2017
19:10
Loading here for the inevitable rise.
greenknight1
07/1/2017
09:30
Taxman unleashes its 'snooper computer': what information does its have on you? 0 Comments Reminder letter from HMRC for filing of self-assessment tax return The deadline for 2015/16 self assessment tax returns is looming, at the end of January Credit: DWImages /Alamy list of article image 2 Easy transfers to a foreign bank account What is the most cost-effective and convenient way to get money to loved ones abroad? Read more › Sponsored Laura Suter 7 January 2017 • 7:37am HM Revenue & Customs has spent years and £100m or more on a super-computer designed to identify those who may have paid too little tax. And now – with the deadline for filing 2015-16 tax returns just weeks away – the system is being fully deployed for the first time. Instead of relying solely on information provided by taxpayers via their returns, HMRC’s powerful “Connect”; system now draws on information from myriad government and corporate sources to create a profile of each taxpayer’s total income. Where this varies from the information provided by the taxpayer, the account is flagged and could be subject to further investigation. For the first time, HMRC is also using these powers to warn individuals to check that they have not underpaid. Sponsored stories Here’s the House Obama Will Live in After He Moves Out of the White House Here’s the House Obama Will Live in After He Moves Out of the White House Mansion Global Gamers around the world have been waiting for this game! Gamers around the world have been waiting for this game! Forge Of Empires Recommended by "We all leave a massive electronic footprint of where we are, when we are away, what we do and what we spend"George Bull, RSM Last month it sent letters to 10,000 individuals who had submitted their 2014-15 tax return without a complete declaration of savings interest received. HMRC said it had used information gathered from banks, peer-to-peer lenders such as Zopa and other financial institutions and then checked it against individuals’ tax returns. It sent letters to those with discrepancies. A spokesman said: “We have written to customers who appear to have under-declared untaxed interest.” Screen shot provided by Airbnb from their website shows a typical search for listings of rooms to rent Home-sharing website Airbnb is used by many to rent out rooms or their whole property, and earn additional income Credit: AP The Connect system’s data-hoarding does not stop at the income people have received from work and investment. “Connect broadly deals with information spontaneously available in government departments or as part of the digital footprint that people leave when they use the internet,” said George Bull, senior tax partner at RSM, the auditing and consulting firm. “We all leave a massive electronic footprint of where we are, when we are away, what we do and what we spend.” The Connect system crunches data from Airbnb, the rental platform, for instance, or eBay. It can also access Land Registry records to see houses purchased and ensure the correct tax has been paid. From there, further sources enable it to determine if properties are being rented out and whether that income has been declared. It can also determine if someone is likely to be able to afford such properties, or whether they are suspected of having used previously undeclared income or savings. HMRC gains anonymised information on all Visa and Mastercard transactions, enabling it to identify areas of likely underpayments which it can then target further, seeking details of individuals’ transactions where necessary. As of September last year, HMRC can now get information from banks and financial organisations in British overseas territories, such as the Channel Islands, while from this year it can gather this information from 60 more countries. “This is the tipping of the scales,” said Richard Morley of accountant BDO. “Five years ago those making minor tax errors would feel fairly safe. But HMRC now has more information and more access to information.” HMRC will also be one of the government bodies to gain access to information under new laws known commonly as the “snoopers̵7; charter”. The legislation means telecom providers store customers’ web browsing and email records for at least a year; it can then be accessed by the Government.
la forge
07/1/2017
09:30
Taxman unleashes its 'snooper computer': what information does its have on you? 0 Comments Reminder letter from HMRC for filing of self-assessment tax return The deadline for 2015/16 self assessment tax returns is looming, at the end of January Credit: DWImages /Alamy list of article image 2 Easy transfers to a foreign bank account What is the most cost-effective and convenient way to get money to loved ones abroad? Read more › Sponsored Laura Suter 7 January 2017 • 7:37am HM Revenue & Customs has spent years and £100m or more on a super-computer designed to identify those who may have paid too little tax. And now – with the deadline for filing 2015-16 tax returns just weeks away – the system is being fully deployed for the first time. Instead of relying solely on information provided by taxpayers via their returns, HMRC’s powerful “Connect”; system now draws on information from myriad government and corporate sources to create a profile of each taxpayer’s total income. Where this varies from the information provided by the taxpayer, the account is flagged and could be subject to further investigation. For the first time, HMRC is also using these powers to warn individuals to check that they have not underpaid. Sponsored stories Here’s the House Obama Will Live in After He Moves Out of the White House Here’s the House Obama Will Live in After He Moves Out of the White House Mansion Global Gamers around the world have been waiting for this game! Gamers around the world have been waiting for this game! Forge Of Empires Recommended by "We all leave a massive electronic footprint of where we are, when we are away, what we do and what we spend"George Bull, RSM Last month it sent letters to 10,000 individuals who had submitted their 2014-15 tax return without a complete declaration of savings interest received. HMRC said it had used information gathered from banks, peer-to-peer lenders such as Zopa and other financial institutions and then checked it against individuals’ tax returns. It sent letters to those with discrepancies. A spokesman said: “We have written to customers who appear to have under-declared untaxed interest.” Screen shot provided by Airbnb from their website shows a typical search for listings of rooms to rent Home-sharing website Airbnb is used by many to rent out rooms or their whole property, and earn additional income Credit: AP The Connect system’s data-hoarding does not stop at the income people have received from work and investment. “Connect broadly deals with information spontaneously available in government departments or as part of the digital footprint that people leave when they use the internet,” said George Bull, senior tax partner at RSM, the auditing and consulting firm. “We all leave a massive electronic footprint of where we are, when we are away, what we do and what we spend.” The Connect system crunches data from Airbnb, the rental platform, for instance, or eBay. It can also access Land Registry records to see houses purchased and ensure the correct tax has been paid. From there, further sources enable it to determine if properties are being rented out and whether that income has been declared. It can also determine if someone is likely to be able to afford such properties, or whether they are suspected of having used previously undeclared income or savings. HMRC gains anonymised information on all Visa and Mastercard transactions, enabling it to identify areas of likely underpayments which it can then target further, seeking details of individuals’ transactions where necessary. As of September last year, HMRC can now get information from banks and financial organisations in British overseas territories, such as the Channel Islands, while from this year it can gather this information from 60 more countries. “This is the tipping of the scales,” said Richard Morley of accountant BDO. “Five years ago those making minor tax errors would feel fairly safe. But HMRC now has more information and more access to information.” HMRC will also be one of the government bodies to gain access to information under new laws known commonly as the “snoopers̵7; charter”. The legislation means telecom providers store customers’ web browsing and email records for at least a year; it can then be accessed by the Government.
la forge
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