Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSB London Ordinary Share GB00B03MM408 'B' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -4.50 -0.2% 2,268.50 2,268.00 2,268.50 2,276.50 2,257.00 2,272.50 2,336,238 12:30:21
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 304,394.4 27,932.6 221.1 10.5 84,746

Royal Dutch Shell Share Discussion Threads

Showing 18251 to 18270 of 18275 messages
Chat Pages: 731  730  729  728  727  726  725  724  723  722  721  720  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
17/1/2020
12:13
I wonder if ESG has reached "peak message" and folk just aren't interested anymore? One thing to preach to your own bubble group but another thing entirely to keep the general public on board (especially considering the amount of effort far-left organisations like the BBC have put into hammering out the enviro-fear message).
septimus quaid
17/1/2020
11:59
I think the key thing, purely as a Shell investor, is whether the financial community believes that enough effort is being made to succeed in the transition to a lower carbon world - whether or not that transition is actually needed. Like it or not, ESG Investing cannot be ignored and, to a degree, must almost be pandered to.
fjgooner
17/1/2020
09:44
"sarkasm16 Jan '20 - 20:04 - 8930 of 8938 What ever you say rubi we still have to steem the extreme affects of climate change what ever the reason" We have to what? As to whatever, if you incorrectly diagnose the causes of climate change then you'll fail to take the appropriate measures to mitigate it!!!!
crossing_the_rubicon
17/1/2020
06:33
clouds - what was the percentage difference in cloud cover when the planes stopped flying after 9/11?
mr woodentop
16/1/2020
22:13
Eric Dyson 16 Jan 2020 9:24PMJust like they (MOMENTUM) mobilise thousands every week to infiltrate Brexit sites and post anti brexit comments and try to get on BBC/ITV audiences pretending to be Tories.
xxxxxy
16/1/2020
20:49
Exclusive: U.S. firm GIP, Shell-Cosan venture plan to bid on Brazil refineries- sources share with twitter share with LinkedIn share with facebook share via e-mail 0 01/16/2020 | 02:52pm GMT A tanker truck leaves the Petrobras Alberto Pasqualini Refinery in Canoas U.S.-based financial firm Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP) is planning a joint bid with Brazil's fuel distribution company Raízen for refineries put on the block by Petroleo Brasileiro SA, two sources with knowledge of the matter said. Raízen, a joint venture between Royal Dutch Shell PLC and Brazilian ethanol producer Cosan SA, has presented non binding offers for the largest refineries put on sale by state-controlled Petrobras. New York-based GIP manages over $50 billion in assets through its infrastructure funds, investing in sectors such as energy, transport, water and waste management. If this consortium bid is successful, it will mark GIP's first investment in Brazil. Last year, it started raising a new fund for investments in emerging countries in Latin America and Asia. Raizen, with more than 7,000 gas stations in Brazil and Argentina, also provides fuel for over 3,000 corporate clients. Still, refining in Brazil has been a Petrobras monopoly for decades. Binding bids for the largest four refineries are expected for early March, and must be presented with the final composition of the groups, the sources added, seeking anonymity because they were not authorized to disclose the talks. Since November, when Petrobras selected four groups to deliver binding offers for the first four refineries, companies interested have been in talks to form consortia. The groups that went to the second phase are Ultrapar Participações SA, Raizen, United Arab Emirates' state investor Mubadala Investment Company and China's Sinopec. Ultrapar and Mubadala are still in talks with potential partners, but no agreement has been reached yet, people with knowledge of the matter said. Sinopec is planning to present a bid alone. Raizen and GIP declined to comment on the matter. By Carolina Mandl and Tatiana Bautzer
sarkasm
16/1/2020
20:32
lol past history and cultural differences have little to do with extreme climate change xxxxxy and do little to combat the problem Shell and other oil majors are thankfully being proactive
sarkasm
16/1/2020
20:20
Also alternative sources of energy important. The Middle East is an unsvoury place for business. Eg stoning to death. Disgusting politics
xxxxxy
16/1/2020
20:04
what ever you say rubi we still have to steem the extreme affects of climate change what ever the reason
sarkasm
16/1/2020
20:02
Watchdog boss tells UK oil and gas industry it is ‘not doing enough’ to tackle climate change Oil & Gas By Andrew Fawthrop 16 Jan 2020 Speaking in Aberdeen, Tim Eggar, the boss of the UK's Oil and Gas Authority, urged his industry to take faster and more extensive action to address climate change Tim Eggar OGA UK Oil and Gas Authority chairman Tim Eggar (Credit: OGA) The chairman of the UK’s Oil and Gas Authority (OGA) Tim Eggar issued a warning to his industry that there are no longer any second chances in addressing climate change, and that its “social licence to operate” is under threat. He was addressing delegates at an event in Aberdeen, where he advocated for much speedier and widespread action in reducing the carbon footprint of oil and gas operations – telling industry leaders they are “collectively not doing enough”. Fossil fuel companies are facing mounting pressure to enact low carbon reforms to the way they do business, given their centrality to the debate around climate change. The watchdog boss said: “The biggest challenge facing the industry has been the speed of the shift in public and industry opinion on climate change. “I have been involved one way or another in this industry for more than 40 years – and I have been through a number of oil price cycles but I cannot remember anything like the industry rethink of the last few months. “Clearly, climate change is happening right now. That debate is over. “The framework, the licence to operate for the industry, has changed fundamentally and – unlike the oil price – forever. “If the industry wants to survive and contribute to the energy transition it has to adapt. “Public opinion on climate change, and the government’s legally-binding commitment to net zero emissions by 2050 – 2045 in Scotland – means that we have to do everything we can to contribute to achieving this. “That applies to the OGA and to every oil and gas operating and service company.” OGA chief Tim Eggar warns against ‘too much naval gazing’ The transition to net zero has generated much debate and discussion within the oil and gas industry, but Eggar believes too much time has been spent talking about the issues and not enough time acting upon them. “There has been too much navel gazing”, he said. “We have to act much, much faster and go farther in reducing the carbon footprint. “Our energy systems must keep improving at pace, to become cleaner and more efficient and this requires ambitious thinking, capital investment and bold leadership. Action, not just talk or more analysis.” The regulator chief revealed his organisation would be taking a much more hands-on approach to overseeing changes in the industry – with a particular focus to be placed on flaring and venting activities as well as “energy integration” technologies like carbon capture and storage (CCS) and hydrogen. Oil and gas will have a part to play on the road to net zero Despite his cautionary remarks, Eggar emphasised his view that oil and gas will continue to play an important role in the UK economy in the journey to net zero. He encouraged the industry to take a more proactive approach to tackling climate issues and developing the technologies and expertise necessary to ensure the industry plays a part in wider global efforts to address emissions reduction. “The most well-regarded and objective analysis of the path to 2050 – the Committee on Climate Change’s ‘Net Zero’ report – points to oil and gas remaining an important and critical part of our energy mix for the foreseeable future as we transition to net zero”, he said. “Indeed, without gas we cannot transition to net zero. “There are already some good examples of companies taking the initiative. Some of you have been setting carbon reduction targets from operations and putting in place programmes to reduce flaring and venting and increase efficiency. “There has also been good early work on carbon capture – Teeside, Acorn and Liverpool Bay are just three examples. “This is a very exciting industry. I’ve been around long enough to have seen the oil and gas industry prove itself time and time again, over many decades, to be adaptable and highly resilient. “You have ridden out the cycles and surmounted huge geopolitical and technology challenges. You have contributed massively to economic growth and people’s wellbeing. “You are now facing a more fundamental challenge – a challenge outside your comfort zone. If together we do not surmount it we will all be doing the world’s environment a major disservice.”
sarkasm
16/1/2020
19:51
"Ariane16 Jan '20 - 15:46 - 8915 of 8925 Tend to agree with your view regarding china and india but you omit to include others especially the USA" NOTE I SAID "Notionally!" Per Capita US is ahead,sure. Population 350million versus China's 1.4billion! Note Greta ONLY criticizes North america and Europe - not China and India. My point! I know per capita USA has a higher pollution level but when it comes to the Environment "notional tonnage" is ALL Gaia cares about! And China is streets ahead.. As will be India.
crossing_the_rubicon
16/1/2020
19:49
How the six major oil companies have invested in renewable energy projects Features & AnalysisWindOil & Gas By James Murray 16 Jan 2020 Some of the oil majors have invested heavily in renewables, such as wind and solar, as they look to transition towards cleaner energy sources Wind turbine Major oil firms have been investing in wind capacity (Credit: Tom Corser) Oil and gas is often painted as the dirtiest sector within the energy industry, but major companies have begun to invest in renewable technologies in a bid to clean up the economy. Of the six “super-majors” – BP, Shell, Chevron, Total, Eni and Exxon – many of them have pumped billions into clean energy projects, although question marks remain over whether they are doing enough. Despite the growth in renewables, “big oil” only spent 1% of its combined budget on green energy schemes in 2018. Matthias J Pickl, economics professor at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in Saudi Arabia, wrote a report in November 2019 discussing whether oil companies are transforming themselves into energy firms. Titled The renewable energy strategies of oil majors – From oil to energy?, it highlighted how wind and solar are taking an increasingly important role in the energy industry, and that oil majors are “progressively positioning themselves for the proclaimed energy transition”. “Oil firms are essentially attempting to figure out how the best presently available cash cow in the world can be replaced for the benefit of their own sustainable future,” he wrote in the report. “Furthermore, growing concerns about climate change following the Paris Agreement may provide an additional drive for such strategy to hedge against hardening investor sentiment towards carbon emissions.” Here, NS Energy looks into how each of the six oil majors have invested in renewable energy projects. Major oil companies’ investments in renewable energy projects BP BP was the first oil major to commit significant capital to renewable projects, such as wind and solar, from 1980 onwards. Formerly known as the British Petroleum Company, it rebranded to Beyond Petroleum in 2001 with a look towards other energy sources beyond oil. In the aftermath of the 2010 Deep Water Horizon oil spill incident in the Gulf of Mexico, BP closed most of its previous green energy investments, believed to be worth about $8bn to $10bn. But the company still has more than 2200 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity in the US and has started to re-invest in renewables in recent years. bp greenwashing BP has been investing in solar power in recent years (Credit: Mike Mozart/Flickr) It spent $200m in 2017 on acquiring a 43% stake in Lightsource, which has rebranded to Lightsource BP and is Europe’s largest solar power project developer. In 2018, the firm made three investments to prepare for a low-carbon future. The first of which was a $20m investment in StoreDot, an Israeli developer of rapid-charging batteries. BP then made a $5m investment in US company FreeWire, which makes fast-charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. And finally, $160m was spent on acquiring Chargemaster, the UK’s leading network of charging points. This allowed the oil firm an opportunity to combine Chargemaster’s 6,500 charging points network with its 1,200 petrol stations. Shell Shell’s investment target for green energy projects was set between $4bn and $6bn for the period from 2016 until the end of 2020 – but with less than a year to go, The Guardian says the sum is “well below” those figures. The Anglo-Dutch firm’s 2016 New Energies strategy covers several areas including electricity, wind and solar, electric vehicle charging, and initiatives to encourage the adoption of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles. It spent a reported $2bn on setting up a low-carbon energy and electricity generation business in 2016 – ensuring it was on course to meet its targets at the time. The following year, it acquired UK-based electricity and gas provider First Utility, as well as Europe’s largest electric vehicle charging company NewMotion. In 2018, Shell bought a 44% stake in US solar power firm Silicon Ranch for $200m and made a $20m equity investment in India-based renewable power company Husk Power Systems. Total Total’s plan for renewables is to invest $500m a year in clean energy technologies. That figure is about 3% of the French oil major’s total capital expenditure, with plans in place to ramp that up to 20% over the next 20 years. Lightsource BP solar Total is aiming to become a global integrated leader in solar power (Credit: Flickr/Dept of Energy Solar Decathlon) Over the past 10 years, it has made a number of strategic investments, which included $1.4bn being spent on acquiring a 60% stake in US solar firm SunPower in 2011. Total is aiming to become a global integrated leader in solar power and has 1.6 gigawatts (GW) worth of capacity, and plans to increase that to 5GW over the next five years. In 2016, it purchased French battery manufacturer Saft for $1.1bn and bought Belgian green power utility Lampiris for $224m. Total acquired a 74% stake in the French electricity retailer Direct Energie for $1.7bn in 2018, propelling the company forward into being one of the top utility providers in France. Eni Although Eni is not quite up to speed with its rival oil majors, the Italian company has plans in place to invest further in renewable technologies. In 2014, it launched the world’s first conversion of a traditional refinery to a biorefinery that produces jet fuel, green diesel, green naphtha and liquid petroleum gas. With an eye on growing its onshore and offshore wind capacity, Eni formed partnerships with France-based GE Renewable Energy and Norwegian energy company Equinor. Clean energy sources play a key role in the firm’s corporate strategy and it is targeting to deliver 1GW of installed renewable power capacity between 2018 and 2021 by investing €1.2bn ($1.3bn), with a long-term goal of reaching 5GW by 2025. Chevron Chevron’s investments in renewables have been relatively scarce, with no target in place for a move to cleaner technology. The US firm has invested in solar, wind and geothermal projects over the past 20 years but, following low returns, the focus has remained on its oil and gas business. In 2018, Chevron launched a Future Energy Fund, with an initial commitment of $100m set aside to invest in breakthrough technologies that will reduce carbon emissions and provide cleaner energy. ExxonMobil Like its US counterpart, Exxon has shown very little interest in investing in renewable energy technologies, with no budget or time-scale planned for future projects. The company’s strategy revolves around reducing greenhouse gas emissions, advancing biofuels, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Exxon holds interests in about a third of the world’s CCS capacity and captured 6.9 million metric tonnes of carbon dioxide for sequestration – the process of separating the gas from the atmosphere – in 2015. In 2019, it announced plans to develop carbon capture fuel cell technology, which produces power and captures and concentrates CO2 for storage – resulting in potential cost reductions.
sarkasm
16/1/2020
18:58
there enough available land plant trees in the sahara and start drilling in one of the worlds biggest aquafiers soon cars will be not privately owned if you wish to go somewhere, just fone for a taxi, hopefully driven by a human not a robot trev1223 16 Jan '20 - 18:42 - 8924 of 8924 0 0 0 xxxxxy & Lippy4 - You are absolutely correct about growing populations being the main factor in climate change. They require heating, cars, transport of all kinds, electricity, roads etc, etc. All adding to more pollution.
sarkasm
16/1/2020
18:42
xxxxxy & Lippy4 - You are absolutely correct about growing populations being the main factor in climate change. They require heating, cars, transport of all kinds, electricity, roads etc, etc. All adding to more pollution.
trev1223
16/1/2020
18:33
HMMMMMMMMMM A GOOD HUMANBEAN Beware potash how about farming the oceans via floating islands and undersea farmimg communities at first linked to decommissioned oil rigs so much to do but so little time to do so first stop Greenland
sarkasm
16/1/2020
18:24
sorry to forget adding all those other countries but it just a rant about greta not going for all the main characters just the easy ones.. also fjgooner the biggest problem is the population, as with its growth they will want more meat so it gets worse and you cannot live totally on veggies as they do not supply all the required balanced diet.. we need the protein from meat,dont you remember thats why cannibalism existed in many cultures,meat!!
lippy4
16/1/2020
16:39
like greggs you will soon have Mcvegan
waldron
16/1/2020
16:35
We all know that coal burning is very bad for the planet, and the strong arguments about oil and lesser about LNG, but what about the impact of meat consumption? Did you all see the program "Apocalypse Cow: How Meat Killed the Planet" on Channel 4 on the 8th January. It made it very clear that (and I quote) "the biggest problem driving the world towards global disaster is how we feed ourselves, particularly on meat". So it's not only a hybrid solution within the energy production sector that is required. It's a much wider hybrid solution including an understanding of the appallingly huge impact of meat-based food consumption. Shell can and I'm sure will play its part - and I hope it does - but McDonalds etcetera should be under equally strong scrutiny to ensure that they take part in the required transition. And as per the article posted yesterday, it's good to see the airlines moving towards more sustainable fuels.
fjgooner
16/1/2020
16:00
What on earth has religion got to do with anything? Utterly bogus, except as political control.
erogenous jones
16/1/2020
15:59
>>Sails to US with wind power, flys back Business class.>> https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/12/climate/greta-thunberg-return-europe.html
zho
Chat Pages: 731  730  729  728  727  726  725  724  723  722  721  720  Older
Your Recent History
LSE
RDSB
Royal Dutc..
Register now to watch these stocks streaming on the ADVFN Monitor.

Monitor lets you view up to 110 of your favourite stocks at once and is completely free to use.

By accessing the services available at ADVFN you are agreeing to be bound by ADVFN's Terms & Conditions

P: V: D:20200117 12:45:24