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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Royal Dutch Shell Plc LSE:RDSB London Ordinary Share GB00B03MM408 'B' ORD EUR0.07
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  17.40 1.07% 1,646.60 1,644.20 1,645.00 1,669.20 1,643.20 1,661.40 8,943,556 16:35:25
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Oil & Gas Producers 132,052.6 -19,723.5 -203.3 - 60,228

Royal Dutch Shell Share Discussion Threads

Showing 27601 to 27622 of 27625 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
03/12/2021
21:01
One of the unfortunate side effects of a steeply rising oil price this year is that it seems to have undermined the potential profitability of the Cambo oil field off the Shetlands. Announcing this morning that it was pulling out of the project, in which it had a 30 per cent share, Shell said it had re-examined the figures and 'concluded the economic case for investment in this project is not strong enough at this time.'No, it doesn't make much sense to me, either. If Shell was happy to go ahead with the Cambo project this time last year, when oil was $40 a barrel it is hard to see what has changed to make it less economic with oil at $70 a barrel and the longer-term outlook for oil prices much higher. I suspect that it would be much closer to the truth to say that Shell has decided that opening a new oil field in the North Sea has become too much of a political liability and that its board is too feeble to stand up to environmental activists who have targeted the company, and who are bound to turn up at every AGM from now on and glue themselves to the lectern. Shell has decided it could have a quieter life trying to make money from 'nice' things like running my broadband – an activity in which it is a little easier to reduce your corporate carbon emissions than the mucky business of sucking oil out of the ground.The government has been as feeble as Shell's board in making the case for the Cambo oil fieldIt is strange to think that just seven years ago the Scottish National Party ran an independence campaign predicated on the idea that Scotland could grow rich by taking control of oil revenues from the North Sea. Now, Nicola Sturgeon has come out against Cambo and one of the Green ministers in her government, Patrick Harvie, was positively wetting himself on the Today programme at the news, claiming how it showed that the big oil companies are finally coming round to accepting we are headed for climate doom, and we are all now going to speed ahead to a greener future.Except, that is, Shell pulling out of the Cambo project hasn't reduced the global appetite for oil one jot. Britain might have bound itself to a zero carbon future by 2050, but the US, China and most of the world have made it quite clear that while they might have vague ambitions to eliminate carbon emissions at some point in the future they are not going to compromise the living standards of their people in order to get there.What Shell's decision does do is to speed up the day when no FTSE-listed company will dare involve itself in fossil fuels. Rather, that business will be left to overseas companies and to private equity, such as Siccar Point, the company which owns the rest of the Cambo project and which has indicated it has no intention of withdrawing. How much easier it is to run an oil company in the age of Greta when you operate below the radar of public consciousness.But if activists do succeed in preventing Cambo producing oil, all it will mean is that we will end up importing more oil instead. Green transition or not, we will still need fossil fuels for many years to come – for rather longer, I suspect, than the government's ban on new petrol and diesel cars from 2030 would imply. A sharp rise in the prices of rare metals has just knocked ministers' claim that petrol and electric cars could be heading for price parity with petrol ones by 2024.The government has been as feeble as Shell's board in making the case for the Cambo oil field. But if large corporations flee the North Sea it certainly won't help the transition to Net Zero. On the contrary, the 'net' bit of net zero is going to require the development of large scale carbon capture and storage – capturing carbon, liquidising it and, perhaps, pumping it into underground chambers vacated by extracted oil and gas. Push the major oil companies out of the North Sea and you take away the businesses best placed to develop that. Not that there is a lot of forward thinking in the mad, emotional dash to Net Zero.
che7win
03/12/2021
14:59
I think your first para will apply more to the Millennials as opposed to the, how can I put it, more mature motorist. Anyway, I quite enjoy a good polishing session...... spud
spud
03/12/2021
13:52
Spud, I'm expecting many to "hire their car per trip" going forward rather than own their own car myself. Loss of independence/freedom to go wherever, whenever, take a diversion on a whim, but no hassle of parking/annual taxes,or maintenance. Rather the freedom and hassle myself but who knows what the future lies. Personally I'd like one of these: "The Pop up" Failing that TF-X looks awesome. Suspect my wallet wont be big enough though! :) hTTps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZIpG7hFHEw
geckotheglorious
03/12/2021
12:10
Indeed Geck - My next vehicle will be powered by electrons. spud
spud
03/12/2021
10:45
Watford, Agreed. Saying that I am seeing more and more Teslas on UK roads now. :)
geckotheglorious
03/12/2021
10:39
Also think people are forgetting it is not just about U.K.Shell and BP are global companies - however slow the U.K. is in moving to green I am pretty certain it is far more advanced that 95% of countries.Anyone who thinks they will seeing 1000's of Tesla's driving through a number of 3rd world countries anytime soon is bonkersOil will be around for a while yet
watfordhornet
03/12/2021
10:19
Hyper AL "Total rubbish, it's far cheaper extracting energy from the wind than out of the ground, the future is wind, tidal and solar with appropriate storage solutions such as green hydrogen and battery technologies" What happens when the wind doesn't blow? Do we ALL go without power? Or is power rationed? As to solar, great if you live in a country with plenty of sunshine each year - UK? You're having a laugh. There need to be backups as Wind/Solar in the UK simply isnt viable - unless you havle the population. The future is Nuclear. Small modular nucealr reactors. And possibly hydrogen.
geckotheglorious
03/12/2021
07:39
European stocks set to open higher, looking for a positive end to a tumultuous week Published Fri, Dec 3 20212:26 AM EST Elliot Smith @ElliotSmithCNBC Key Points European stocks are looking to rebound from Thursday’s pullback, which saw the tech sector on the continent drop 3.8% to lead losses across the board. Fears over the potential impact of the omicron variant appeared to abate slightly on Friday after scientists in South Africa, where the variant was first discovered, said existing vaccines should still offer protection against severe cases and deaths from Covid-19. LONDON — European markets are set to open higher on Friday, looking for a positive end to a tumultuous week following the discovery of the new omicron Covid-19 variant. Britain’s FTSE 100 is seen around 33 points higher at 7,162, Germany’s DAX is set to gain around 112 points to 15,375 and France’s CAC 40 is expected to add around 45 points to 6,841, according to IG data.
waldron
03/12/2021
07:33
in post 19394 ""Cambo remains critical to the UK's energy security and economy," Siccar Point Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Roger said in a statement. " Total rubbish, it's far cheaper extracting energy from the wind than out of the ground, the future is wind, tidal and solar with appropriate storage solutions such as green hydrogen and battery technologies. The pressure from the major funds on UK listed Shell to move from hydrocarbons is immense. If Shell manages the transition, it should have a great future. Go Shell Go, Go for Green "Keep going well, keep going Shell, You can be sure of Shell!"
hyper al
02/12/2021
23:50
ref 19395. With all due respect to the OP writer, Suriname has been a bit of a struggle for Total/Apache. Sure they made 4 quick discoveries that initially looked super promising. However there is a lot of high GOR associated gas in much of that oil which means that oil may not get developed as there is no local market for gas at that scale. Apache/Total have a policy of zero routine flaring in Suriname meaning the gas will need to be re-injected. The search has therefore morphed into trying to find black oil with a more manageable (low) gas to oil ratio. Also some step out appraisals of the 4 discoveries came up blank. Let's say they need 500mmbo to sanction a project..... well they don't seem to have got there yet! Initially the 4 discoveries seemed like 4 separate stand alone developments. It now looks like 3 of the 4 will be rolled into one development assuming there is a development. Total haven't said much so far but will have to update market at some point. Been costly, wells have taken 3 to 4 even 5 months each to drill. I mean they have used 3 rigs, will have drilled 9 or 10 wells over 2 yrs. May get concrete news in Q1/22.
xxnjr
02/12/2021
22:05
Andy RoadKing51 MIN AGOMessage ActionsThe destruction of the economy by the green blob continues apace. The blob has been destroying our industries for so long it is now considered normal.I remember when the production of the Ford Transit was transferred to Turkey along with a grant for £millions in 2014 after 50 years of being manufactured in the UK . The first news reports excitedly reported how it would reduce the UK's carbon footprint: It certainly did that, at the expense of moving pollution to Turkey and destroying thousands of skilled UK jobs and tax revenue.It is going to take mass poverty and energy blackouts to stop this nonsense. EDITEDREPLY 40FLAGGLGraham Leighton58 MIN AGOMessage ActionsIt's all a New Religion a cult for woke virtue signalling fanatics.Net zero future - zero heating, zero flights, zero cars, zero money, zero jobs, zero meat, zero happiness etc..... Daily Telegraph
xxxxxy
02/12/2021
19:13
Https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Could-Suriname-Become-The-Next-Oil-Hotspot-In-Latin-America.html
waldron
02/12/2021
18:22
They did state last year they wanted to reduce net debt to $65bn, at H1 it was $65.7bn and they started their $2bn share buyback which finishes 29th Dec. At Q3 net debt was $57.5bn with a gearing of circa 25%. So guess they feel net debt is sufficiently low to embark on a further buyback.They have authority to buyback just over 687 million shares so guess whenever gearing and fcf allow they will continue to buyback shares for some years to come.Do have mixed views on buybacks but the negatives wouldn't force me to sell up here, Yes would like more in the way of dividends but capital growth (increased eps) could hopefully more than compensate when re-rated, also it looks like they are achieving their targeted gearing.......so it is what it is.
disc0dave45
02/12/2021
18:06
Oil Prices Bounce Back Despite The OPEC+ Decision By Tsvetana Paraskova - Dec 02, 2021, 10:30 AM CST Oil prices rose on Thursday after OPEC+ decided to keep its oil production policy unchanged and add another 400,000 bpd on the market in January. As of 10:14 a.m. EST, post OPEC+ meet, WTI Crude was up 1.46% at $66.53 and Brent Crude had increased 1.35% at $69.80. Both benchmarks erased the losses of 3% right after first news reports suggested the monthly increase was on for January. OPEC+ is sticking to its production plan to add 400,000 barrels per day (bpd) to its production in January, OPEC said in a statement on Thursday, noting that the meeting remains in session. The group “agree that the meeting shall remain in session pending further developments of the pandemic and continue to monitor the market closely and make immediate adjustments if required,” OPEC said. The next regularly scheduled meeting of OPEC+ is set for January 4, 2022. So, the group is now set to add oil on the market in January, although speculation was high in recent days that OPEC+ could opt for a pause in the monthly increases because of the still high uncertainty over the Omicron COVID variant, the SPR releases led by the United States, and the expected worse-than-thought oil surplus early next year. The leaders of the group, Saudi Arabia and Russia, had already signaled earlier this week that OPEC+ should not jump the gun and freeze the monthly additions to supply because of the Omicron variant, which has spooked the oil market. With still little information on the new variant and whether it escapes vaccine protection, the alliance looks ready to take further action, if necessary, but it is showing it is not over-reacting to Omicron as many analysts said the market has done. Initial reactions to the rollover of the production policy suggest that OPEC+ could also believe that global demand will remain resilient during the winter season, and sends a message to the market present in almost every press release: stability. By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com
waldron
02/12/2021
12:50
Buybacks should only happen if the market capitalisation is below the netbook value of the business. If not then it should be paid back in dividends. As for paying down debt this is an absolute no. Large companies can borrow at a much cheaper rate than me, an ordinary investor. Therefore I want the companies I invest in to leverage my investment with cheap bank debt so that they can generate higher returns for me.
adeg
02/12/2021
11:54
The money saved by not paying dividends to all the cancelled shares should immediately be going into the dividend pot to enhance payments to holders. It’s the only way we see any benefit from buybacks. If they don’t do that they’re just reducing the overall dividend payout.
biddy74
02/12/2021
10:28
Shell should have been engaging in buybacks when the share price was in 900's. Did they? Rather they didn't now with the stock in 1500-1600 level All about padding the KPIs to improve board of director remuneration at these levels. Rather they paid down debt as well.
geckotheglorious
02/12/2021
09:58
Must admit not a fan of buybacks even if written off would rather them use cash to pay down debt,invest in profitable projects and or improved divi payouts thereby allowing the choice to holders as to reinvestment lets hope this time round the share price is from here on in the cheapest it gets
grupo guitarlumber
02/12/2021
09:25
Agreed Holts. We will only see the benefit of buybacks if and when that transfers to greater dividends payable to the remaining holders.
biddy74
02/12/2021
08:41
Https://www.euronews.com/green/2021/12/01/shell-plans-underwater-explosions-during-peak-whale-mating-season
grupo guitarlumber
02/12/2021
07:31
More money down the drain on buybacks , theory is fine , in reality if the market is going to trash or enhance the share it will , I would rather we had the money in dividends or even debt reduction .
holts
02/12/2021
07:27
UPSTREAM Pioneering project: Stiesdal Offshore Technologies' innovative TetraSpar pilot floating wind turbine installed offshore Norway 'Pioneering concept': Shell-backed floating wind demonstration project flows first power to Norway Stiesdal Offshore Technologies' maiden TetraSpar floating wind unit in North Sea starts flowing power to grid 2 December 2021 4:24 GMT Updated 2 December 2021 4:24 GMT By Josh Lewis and Darius Snieckus in Perth and London A “pioneering221; floating wind demonstration project designed by Stiesdal Offshore Technologies and backed by the likes of Shell, Tepco and RWE
grupo guitarlumber
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