Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Duke Royalty Limited LSE:DUKE London Ordinary Share GG00BYZSSY63 ORDS NPV
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.20 0.46% 44.10 410,640 10:38:56
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
43.80 44.40 44.10 43.90 43.90
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 1.92 1.10 40.1 88
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
17:06:15 O 1,874 44.10 GBX

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Duke Royalty (DUKE) Most Recent Trades

Trade Time Trade Price Trade Size Trade Value Trade Type
2019-10-17 16:06:1544.101,874826.43O
2019-10-17 14:46:3344.0016773.48O
2019-10-17 14:18:4044.1049,25821,722.19O
2019-10-17 12:40:1544.101,874826.41O
2019-10-17 12:17:4044.1010,0004,410.00O
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Duke Royalty (DUKE) Top Chat Posts

DateSubject
17/10/2019
09:20
Duke Royalty Daily Update: Duke Royalty Limited is listed in the General Financial sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker DUKE. The last closing price for Duke Royalty was 43.90p.
Duke Royalty Limited has a 4 week average price of 43.40p and a 12 week average price of 42.20p.
The 1 year high share price is 49.50p while the 1 year low share price is currently 39.50p.
There are currently 199,872,459 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 279,379 shares. The market capitalisation of Duke Royalty Limited is £88,143,754.42.
04/10/2019
19:04
davr0s: Not the end of the world - you have to accept these if you want to play this game. 6% discount is pretty normal - I've had two others in recent weeks and they have both been of this magnitude. Not a great fan of primary bid so will probably pass on this. -6% move in the share price would be noise if you step back and look at the normal volatility in this share. Price can of course go anywhere but would be surprised if it fell much more than this. In a few weeks this will likely be some distant memory
20/3/2019
23:33
melody9999: NTV - its been quarterly nearly from the start: https://uk.advfn.com/stock-market/london/duke-royalty-DUKE/share-news/Duke-Royalty-Limited-Final-Results-and-Maiden-Divi/75094133
18/2/2019
18:08
hiraniha: Going to ask a thick question here. Looking at the trades on the LSE, there seem to be plenty at or very near 41 pence. They all look like purchases. Can anyone explain to me why the share price hasn't budged today at all?
04/2/2019
09:46
carcosa: Ooohhh thanks podgyted for that Cenkos info. I calculated what I thought the change in dividends would bring and it came out so high I was embarrassed to post it here but after seeing your post I feel a bit more comfortable. FWIW I see DUKE sitting in my portfolio pretty much as an income share. My calcs are based on some of the additional £30m being deployed mid year and the additional 6% incomes as previously declared. Of course, today's RNS is included in my evaluation which brings in a tad under an additional £200k/month. Yields based on 42p share price. Edit: Slight error in my annualised yield table. For Pence read £
17/7/2018
13:57
dsct: Firstly, apologies to the readers here for turning this previously quiet board into a near daily-posting situation - The lack of posts, and those that were here, being informative and useful was one (minor) reason I invested ! lol @Piedro I first looked at DUKE in April - an article in Shares magazine I believe, but although interested, never researched any further until June. A 'too good to be true' attitude, I believe is a benefit when investing, to stop over-zealous or impulsive purchases - speaking from experience and looking at some of the dogs in my 'folio ;^) I think the two main downsides for DUKE could be: 1) - Failure of one (or more) of their Royalty Partners (RPs). The ever-increasing diversification should lessen this impact. I think it will happen at some stage, but their selection criteria appears quite robust. I have read investor's concern about this while they only have/had 4 RPs. 2) Global recession - Increasing the possibility of 1) above. More potential RPs but with obvious added risk(s). Knock-on effect when trying to raise funds. As far as I'm aware, the placing is with new and existing Insitutional/large investors. This may be for speed/cost reasons, but maybe one day there could be a placing or rights issue for all shareholders. The £2m costs of the £44m placing (approx. 5%), plus the 44p placing being a 7.6% discount to the share price, equals a 12.5% one off-cost. I've no idea if this is good, bad or otherwise in comparison to the norm.
29/6/2018
21:50
dsct: @Stevie Blunder Thanks for your replies - very informative. I did go through their website - Who, what, when, how etc. and when looking at the media section, recalled reading about DUKE in the Shares magazine in April and thinking I should DYOR as it looked interesting. Anyway, I've now had a dabble, pre-divi. Initially, I was more interested in the divi return than potential share price increase, but it looks as though the latter could improve as they get more Royalty Partners (even if they have to issue more equity), due to their near-fixed costs.
05/12/2017
11:05
otherwys: Hi Specto, Yes I too have suffered from dilution and in general don't like it. However I think this is a different circumstance. Normally there's a single asset producing revenue, and when more shares get issued that revenue gets split between more shares, so every share has less. In this case, the extra funds will be used to add assets (new royalties) which will be earning revenue; and as the cost base for this type of business is low and pretty much fixed, the dilution is actually in how much of those fixed costs get attributed to each share, so the value per share increases. Simplistic example: £10m asset earning 10% revenue with costs of £0.5m, split between 10m shares: revenue = £1m, costs = £0.5m, profit attributable per share = £0.50. Add £10m shares at £1 each and invest in further assets earning 10%. Then you have £20m assets earning £2m with costs of £0.5m; profit attributable to each share = (£2m-£0.5m)/20m shares = £0.75. This is the beauty of Duke's model; this fundraising will allow an uplift in dividends, which then drives share price up, which then allows the next fundraising to be less dilutive, and so on. It's a virtuous circle. Look at Artemis (Canadian royalty company - share price history, dividend history, fundraising history - it's a proven model. Needless to say, I love it; but of course DYOR! GLA Otherwys
20/11/2017
13:23
otherwys: I agree they'll be looking for cash; but I'm expecting a dividend increase to be announced by end December first. The maiden divi was announced off the back of their first deal, which gave them £900k in income. They now have almost twice that, and their business model seems to be: raise funds do deals increase div watch share price rise raise more funds at higher share price etc At least that's what Artemis have done successfully in Canada, and Duke seem to be modelling themselves on them. Very happy to be invested here. GLA, and DYOR! Otherwys PS new to ADVFN but I use the same name on iii and LSE
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