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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Diverse Income Trust LSE:DIVI London Ordinary Share GB00B65TLW28 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -1.10p -1.19% 91.00p 91.00p 91.80p 91.00p 91.00p 91.00p 74,625 15:03:41
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 16.5 14.8 3.8 23.7 349.25

Diverse Share Discussion Threads

Showing 351 to 372 of 500 messages
Chat Pages: 20  19  18  17  16  15  14  13  12  11  10  9  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
12/6/2017
12:37
I think the tendency here is probably towards large mature companies with big dividends but I think TXH is worth a mention. It's cheap on cashflows and has a strong balance sheet and fat dividend. The balance sheet is beginning to look strong enough that there could be another special dividend if the directors are still thinking the same as two years ago. Just be aware, it's a smallcap with limited liquidity, the directors are getting very old, and they tried to take it private a few years back. The valuation, yield and balance sheet make it look worth a small portion of a portfolio for diversification purposes unless you have a very large portfolio, in which case the limited liquidity could be a problem. That might improve if the shares keep going up, though.
aleman
09/6/2017
06:34
ST GOBAIN 9/06/2017 | 8:03 The Combined General Meeting of the shareholders of Compagnie de Saint-Gobain approved all resolutions. It approved the distribution of a dividend of € 1.26 per share (compared with € 1.24 in 2016), with a full payment in cash. The dividend will be detached from the share on June 12 and will be paid as of June 14, 2017. The directorships of Pamela Knapp and Agnès Lemarchand and Gilles Schnepp and Philippe Varin, all qualified as independent directors, Also been renewed. Following the departure of Jean-Martin Folz and Bernard Gautier, whose experience and judgment contributed greatly to the debates and decisions of Compagnie de Saint-Gobain's Board of Directors, it now has 14 members, including two directors employees.
the grumpy old men
30/5/2017
12:05
Shell and BP dividend ‘looks more sustainable’, says top income investor News 30 May 2017 Simon Gergel, who runs the Merchants Investment Trust, which has a yield of 4.9 per cent, has revealed the reason why he remains keen on the shares of oil giants BP and Shell. COMMENT Gergel: Shell and BP dividends ‘look more sustainable’ Gergel sees dividend potential in BP shares David Thorpe David Thorpe Shell is the largest investment in the £702 million Merchants Investment Trust. Gergel commented, ‘the big oil companies have cut their capital expenditure to the extent that they can now pay the dividend from the cash they generate and also can pay for the investment they make. The dividend is more sustainable now that it has been for some time, and it may be that we get a higher oil price from here as well, offering a further boost to earnings.’ In contrast he is rather less keen on the investment case for the UK housebuilders, commenting, ‘whilst the companies themselves look to be trading on cheap valuations, they are trading at a premium to the value of their net assets. Its not that we are particularly negative on the housebuilders as a sector, but the shares have gone up a lot. He added that he is ‘relatively optimistic’ about the outlook for the UK consumer, remarking that, ‘unemployment is low, and the living wage increase will put more money in people’s pockets.’ Read more: Alex Wright: The best ‘defensiveR17; shares for investors today Amongst the stocks he likes with exposure to the UK consumer are Greene King, a pub company of which he commented, ‘they are showing real earnings growth since the acquisition of Spirit (a rival pub company).’ He has relatively less exposure to the mining sector than does his peer group as a whole, but does have investments in BHP Billiton and Antofagasta, both mining companies that have performed well of late. Read more: JP Morgan: It’s unlikely UK interest rates will rise in the next year The Merchants Investment Trust has returned 29 per cent over the past year, compared with 22 per cent for the average trust in the AIC UK Equity Income sector in the same time period. It trades at a discount to net assets of 4.9 per cent. The largest investments in the trust are Glaxosmithkline and Royal Dutch Shell.
waldron
30/5/2017
12:05
cheers aleman
waldron
28/5/2017
09:19
Http://www.capitaassetservices.com/sites/default/files/UK%20Dividend%20Monitor%20Q1%202017.pdf
aleman
08/5/2017
10:51
Yep still here
robow
08/5/2017
07:35
Anybody still here? New ATH for DIVI this morning. Very sound core holding imo
shavian
28/4/2017
15:37
Connect Group (CNCT) 126.5p Year Ending Revenue (£m) Pre-tax (£m) EPS P/E PEG DPS Grth. Div Yield 2017-08-31 1,825.06 54.91 17.77p 7.7 -0.8 -10% 9.80p 7.7% 2018-08-31 1,791.26 58.46 18.77p 7.2 1.3 6% 10.13p 8.0%
aleman
28/4/2017
15:28
Http://www.sharecast.com/news/hsbc-maintains-go-ahead-group-buy-rating-but-cuts-target-price/25628605.html
grupo guitarlumber
28/4/2017
15:10
hxxp://www.sharecast.com/news/hsbc-maintains-go-ahead-group-buy-rating-but-cuts-target-price/25628605.html
aleman
25/4/2017
20:09
Royal Dutch Shell: Dividend Is Safe Apr. 20, 2017 11:55 AM ET| 41 comments| About: Royal Dutch Shell plc (RDS.A), Includes: RDS.B Searching For Value Searching For Value Long/short equity, deep value, value, special situations (378 followers) Summary Royal Dutch Shell's lack of FCF has caused concern among shareholders about whether the high dividend yield is safe. Recently, a lot of improvement has been made, with a strong yoy increase of the production rate. The last two quarters, more than enough FCF was generated to pay its dividends. From now on it appears that the company will see its results improve further. Royal Dutch Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) (NYSE:RDS.B) has long been a go-to stock for long term investors. With a current dividend yield of over 7%, the stock seems as attractive as ever to long term investors. But a lack of cash flow along with an uncertain operating environment have been cause for concern among investors about whether the company will be able to keep paying out its current dividend without damaging balance sheet too much. There are definitely risks associated with investing in this stock, but I believe that Royal Dutch Shell is making the right moves to improve its business and keep its dividend safe. Lack of FCF While Royal Dutch Shell has seen a steady uptrend in its dividend per share, its FCF has been lacking for years with an extra difficult time because of the downturn in the energy markets since 2014. As FCF has worsened, the company decided to still improve or maintain its dividend per share. This has caused the company to see a quite negative FCF after cash spent on dividends: While it might keep shareholders somewhat happy, if it goes on for too long more and more shareholders will ask themselves whether the company is not destroying its balance sheet with these actions. I have seen multiple titles on Seeking Alpha stating exactly this, and believing that the dividend yield simply is not sustainable. However, I believe that the company is actually steering in the right direction in terms of generating more and stable cash flows. Lower cost and expenses While Royal Dutch Shell's CFO has declined quite a bit these last few years the same goes for its CAPEX, causing FCF to be fairly close to breakeven. Management has been able to lower its CAPEX thus far that it is currently seeing lower CAPEX for Royall Dutch Shell and BG combined than Royal Dutch Shell had two years earlier on its own. The same goes for the operating cost. An example of the cost cutting efforts are the 6,500 reduction in number of employees. Management had this to say on the matter during the most recent earnings call: "Compared to 2014, and that's including BG, our underlying operating costs have been reduced by $10 billion on an annual basis, and our capital investments have been reduced by $20 billion on an annual basis. end of 2016, we are running the underlying operating cost of the combination of Shell and BG below $40 billion, so that is lower than what we used to run Shell on as a standalone company less than 24 months ago. In 2017, it's expected to be lower again." This lower cost and expenses structure lowers the impact that the troubled energy market has had on the company. But in order to survive and thrive, Royal Dutch Shell needs more than just cost cutting. Raising cash Another way that management is currently trying to improve its financial health is by selling assets. The goal is to raise $30 bln between 2016 and 2018. So far management seems to be very positive about the progress that has been made. $5 bln of the $30 bln has been completed in 2016 with more to come: "We just announced in the last few weeks a further $5 billion, and we are making very significant progress on yet another $5 billion of divestment and then a bit more to come on top of it." Investing in growth Investing in future growth opportunities is also something that Royal Dutch Shell deems to be very important. Despite lower CAPEX, the company is still positioning itself for medium and long term growth. One of the ways that management attempted to achieve this goal was by the acquisition of BG. The integration of BG was completed last year. This acquisition is expected to accelerate the growth strategy in both Deep Water and in LNG. Thus far, BG has improved FCF while creating a platform from which the entire company can be reshaped. Last year BG was FCF positive as expected. From now on this acquisition is expected to see strong growth going forward: "BG was free cash flow positive for us last year. As a result, two years ago we said $2.5 billion. We actually pretty much did that last year in 2016. We now expect $4.5 billion pre-tax basis by 2018, so we did the three-year target in one. And this year in 2017, we should get to around $4 billion for the synergies delivered." Industry conditions Since 2014 a big reason for the company's troubles has been the decline in energy prices. Now that this has been making a comeback since the beginning of next year, the company is already seeing improvements in its current business, with more expected as the oil price remains above $50. The most troublesome thing about this company, according to investors, was whether it could keep paying its dividends because of the low FCF. These past two quarters have actually seen so much improvement that the company was able to pay its dividends from its FCF and still have some cash left. Combined over these two quarters, the company had a positive FCF after dividends of $1.5 bln So we are already seeing that this does not have to be a real problem anymore if the company keeps continuing the same course. Now that the cost and expenses structure has improved along with relatively more stable energy prices, the company can increase its production once again. This is exactly what has happened recently. In the fourth quarter of 2016, a strong 28% yoy increase in production was realized. With this growth, the average daily production rate was 3.9 mln boe. It is expected that this rate will increase to 4.0 mln boe per day in the near future. Conclusion So the company is already FCF positive after its dividends. Now, it is in a position where its operating environment is improving, which will result in even higher cash flows in the future. Therefore I believe that the current high dividend yield of the stock is safe. And because a dividend yield of 7% that is sustainable is more than enough return over the long term, investors should seriously consider buying this stock. Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.
waldron
25/4/2017
20:07
Https://seekingalpha.com/article/4063763-royal-dutch-shell-dividend-safe
waldron
17/4/2017
06:17
Do dividends still not lie? (A word to the Weiss) 13:32 17 Feb 2017 Dividends Dividends don't lie, according to investment guru Geraldine Weiss ‘Dividends Don’t Lie: Finding Value in Blue-Chip Stocks” is a well-regarded book by Geraldine Weiss, the former editor of the newsletter, Investment Quality Trends. While the rest of the investment world was focusing on price/earnings ratios – the share price divided by the earnings per share – back in the seventies and eighties Weiss was championing an investment strategy that focused on the dividend yield – dividend as a percentage of share price – of blue chip companies. In particular, she looked for companies with a yield that was close to the top end the historical range, which she regarded as a potential ‘buy’ signal. Likewise, stocks with a yield that was towards the bottom of the range were regarded as overvalued. There were a number of other filters she looked for, many of which we will look at in this article. The book was written in 1990, since when everyone and his dog has gained access to share prices and the computing power to crunch the numbers. In theory, therefore, the chances of a strict application of Weiss’s filters turning up undiscovered gems are practically zero, as the minute any stock falls into buying range, the algorithmic trading automatons at the big investment banks and fund managers should pile in. Instead, we are going to investigate what I have called the Geraldine Weiss Champion Hurdle, applying additional filters as we go along and seeing which ones fall at a particular hurdle, and which ones run on. Hurdle number 1: Does it pay a dividend? There are 967 stocks on the LSE that have a dividend yield, which is to say they paid a dividend in the last 12 months. Excluding venture capital trusts (which are closed-end private equity investment schemes), the highest yielder is Trading Emissions PLC (LON:TRE), the solar power company that is selling off a portion of its Italian solar portfolio and returning cash to shareholders. Valued at just over £5mln, it is no one’s idea of a blue-chip. Of the FTSE 350 stocks, Talktalk Telecom Group PLC (LON:TALK) is the highest yielder at 9.7%. My old mum used to say to me (well, let’s imagine she did for the sake of this article) beware of any stock yielding more than 7%, as it means the market thinks a dividend cut is on the way. Weiss had a filter for sniffing out potential dividend cuts that we’ll get to in a later article, but for information purposes only the other FTSE 350 stocks yielding more than 7% are: Redefine International, Carillion, Pearson, Aberdeen Asset Management, P2P Global Investments, Centamin, Cobham and NEX Group. 2. Is it yielding more than its average yield over the last 10 years? About half of the ‘horses’ fall at this particular hurdle, reducing the field to 499. Of the FTSE 350 runners & riders, Redefine and NEX Group fail to make the cut. 3. Is the yield towards the top end of the historical 10 year range? Restricting the selection to those stocks yielding 1.5 times their 10-year average yield cuts the list to 190 stocks. A number of stocks catch the eye yielding many times their historical average; this can either be a good sign – signifying handsome dividend growth – or a bad sign, signifying the market thinks the divi is not copper-bottomed. In the case of Newmark Security PLC (LON:TCM), for instance, which is yielding 3.3 times its historical average, the signs look positive as the company upped its dividend in 2014 and 2015 and maintained it in 2016, despite issuing a profit warning last year. A bit more digging would be necessary to determine whether Newmark is worth buying, but under Weiss’s system – or at least the parts of it we have applied so far – it might be that the profit warning has battered the share price enough for the stock to be worth pocketing for the dividend. In the case of Fairpoint Group, yielding 5.9 times its historical average, the signs are negative, as the company has signalled it will suspend dividend payments until new management has righted the ship. 4. Does it have a record of growing dividends over the last 10 years? Weiss apparently looked for stocks that had raised dividends at a compound annual rate of at least 10% over the past 12 years. Our data only goes back 10 years, so a compound annual increase of at least 10% over that period equates to an aggregate increase of about 160%. That filter reduces the size of the list to 31 stocks. Oilfield support services firm Petrofac Limited (LON:PFC) was the stock to own over the last 10 years for dividend growth, with the divi up (in sterling terms) from 8.15p in 2007 to 46.87p in 2015/6. 5. Is it selling for two times less than book value? Proving that Weiss was not totally averse to looking at the fundamental value of a company, she liked to filter out stocks that were valued at more than twice their book value (or net asset value, if you prefer). This hurdle knocks another nine runners out of the race, leaving 22. Again, excluding venture capital trusts, the cheapest stock appears to be Pebble Beach Systems Group PLC (LON:PEB), the software and technology company formerly known as Vislink. As the company announced earlier this week it would be restructuring and parting company with its executive chairman after putting out a profit warning earlier this month, it is probably safe to assume this one would not meet Weiss’s definition of a “blue chip company”. 6. Is it trading on an earnings multiple of less than 20? Everyone likes a bargain, and Weiss was apparently no exception, though I am not sure why she chose the cut-off point of a price/earnings ratio of 20. We’re getting down to the nitty-gritty now, with just nine survivors. Screening out venture capital trusts leaves just five, and one of those is Pebble Beach, so in reality we are down to just four companies in what has been more like a steeplechase than a hurdle race. Those four are (drum roll, please): Mitie Group PLC (LON:MTO), Aberdeen Asset Management PLC (LON:ADN), RPS Group PLC (LON:RPS) and UNITE Group PLC (LON:UTG). All of those are worth looking at in more detail and applying a few more of Weiss’s filters, to see whether they make the grade, but that will have to wait for another day.
grupo guitarlumber
17/4/2017
06:13
Http://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/columns/stockpot/27556/dividends-don-t-lie-revisited-two-new-ingredients-for-the-pot-but-rps-is-removed-27556.html
grupo guitarlumber
11/4/2017
08:58
Jeffian, Interesting question. The situation for institutional investors is the most important in determining behaviour for listed companies. Assuming that an institution is chargeable to Corporation Tax, dividend income is tax free for the recipient (as the payer is paying out of taxed income). The institutional position is unchanged by the tax change, I think. The tax credit prior to 5/4/16 was just a book-keeping exercise for institutions, with no real effect. Therefore, I do not expect to see a change in dividend paying behaviour for listed companies. For private companies with a few individual shareholders, they (the shareholders)have had a tax increase as you say, but there isn't much they can do about it. Dividends remain the most tax efficient way of distributing income as NI is avoided (both employers and employees contributions). The elephant in the room is entrepreneur's relief. CGT at 10% on a gain of up to £10m. Private company shareholders will be tempted not to distribute profits, but to target an eventual disposal of the business instead. However, it is risky leaving your money to accumulate in a company, potentially exposed to future business risks not to mention all sorts of spurious claims.
leading
11/4/2017
08:23
TXH dividend increased from 7p to 8.5p for a 6.4% yield.
aleman
10/4/2017
11:27
EJ, Well I do my best to exercise what little common sense I have! The trouble is that one cannot anticipate out-of-the-blue tax changes. The principle that dividends, having incurred corporation taxes at source, were paid out with a tax credit seemed ingrained in the system and the Government's argument that lower corporate tax rates justified removing the credit was clearly specious. It was, purely and simply, a tax rise on those perceived to be able to afford it and was also driven by the Treasury's obsession about individuals who incorporate to receive their remuneration as dividends rather than pay. The arbitrary reduction in the 'tax free' allowance from £5k to £2k tells you where this is going. I will also bet you a pound to a penny that the Treasury has a hard look at tax-free ISA income when it realises how large the sums are that many ISA holders have accumulated, so don't get too comfortable with that! Of course I do the things you say but for anyone with significant dividend income outside their ISA's, it is simply not possible to shift the underlying capital into an ISA, even at £20k/year per person. Anyway, my point wasn't so much what to do about it, but whether the decisions that I and others make in this area will impact on the way that companies pay out earnings to shareholders. Maybe they won't pay out at all, and just accumulate cash as some US companies do. I can see the Law Of Unintended Consequences coming into play here - people and companies often don't react to tax changes the way Governments want or expect them to.
jeffian
10/4/2017
05:06
cheers EJ MINES A DOUBLE enjoy your week
maywillow
09/4/2017
21:11
Jeffian. I am not a financial advisor. However, use common sense. Sheltering investments in wrapper such as an ISA has advantage that dividends and Capital gains are not subject to additional taxation. Eberyone has a CGT allowance and it is thus important to use those investments outside ISA wrapper for minimal dividend revenue and maximum capital gain/loss. SIPPS are important to dispose of wealth to children outside IHT rules. Tax is potentially a complex yet simple game where it is important to assess wealth, the asset class, the transfers between spouses, to children and plan for death which is inevitable for all of us. The problem lies always with illiquid assets.... property is a good example.
erogenous jones
09/4/2017
21:11
Jeffian. I am not a financial advisor. However, use common sense. Sheltering investments in wrapper such as an ISA has advantage that dividends and Capital gains are not subject to additional taxation. Eberyone has a CGT allowance and it is thus important to use those investments outside ISA wrapper for minimal dividend revenue and maximum capital gain/loss. SIPPS are important to dispose of wealth to children outside IHT rules. Tax is potentially a complex yet simple game where it is important to assess wealth, the asset class, the transfers between spouses, to children and plan for death which is inevitable for all of us. The problem lies always with illiquid assets.... property is a good example.
erogenous jones
30/3/2017
17:41
jeffian yes it might be wise to rethink especially if interest rates rise substantially and scrip issues become the new norm i know a lot of people in same situation as you in the meantime enjoy may all your dividends increase
sarkasm
30/3/2017
16:27
As someone who is retired and living principally off the dividends on my portfolio, I wonder if the Government's changes to dividend taxation will have any impact on the way companies make payments to shareholders? I'm certainly carrying out a complete review and it may be that share ownership becomes less popular.
jeffian
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