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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Diverse Income Trust LSE:DIVI London Ordinary Share GB00B65TLW28 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  +0.00p +0.00% 92.10p 91.60p 92.60p 93.00p 91.60p 93.00p 189,290 16:35:10
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 16.5 14.8 3.8 24.0 353.47

Diverse Share Discussion Threads

Showing 301 to 324 of 500 messages
Chat Pages: 20  19  18  17  16  15  14  13  12  11  10  9  Older
DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
07/11/2016
21:16
This is quite comprehensive Http://www.dividenddata.co.uk/
sledin
07/11/2016
21:11
Thanks, maywillow. I like the way it is laid out. Take the yields with a pinch of salt but they are a starting point for research. I've yet to find a site that lists all UK dividends. Get a few in the header and we might get most covered. It's nice to see the this thread is active. ADVFN needs a good dividend thread. I might take to posting occasionally.
aleman
07/11/2016
21:09
moral NEVER RELIE ON ONE SITE
maywillow
07/11/2016
20:45
That investorease site does not seem that good. It's missing many upcoming dividends. For example, BP and RDSA/B, are not listed on the site, yet they both go ex-div on Thursday. I think you will miss many divs if you rely on that site
sledin
07/11/2016
20:38
done and thanks
maywillow
07/11/2016
20:34
CHEERS ALEMAN
waldron
07/11/2016
20:31
This is a good link for upcoming dividends which would fit nicely in the header: Http://www.investorease.com/company.php?disp=exdiv The imminent 1.5p final dividend at DX. can be bought for less than 20p, for those that like that sort of thing.
aleman
04/11/2016
07:52
Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B ADSs November 8,
maywillow
03/11/2016
09:24
The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc (NYSE: RDS.A) (NYSE: RDS.B) today announced the intended timetable for the 2017 quarterly interim dividends. 2017 Interim Dividend Timetable 4th Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 2016 2017 2017 2017 February 2, May 4, July 27, November 2, Announcement date 2017 2017 2017 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS February 15, May 17, August 9, November 15, A and RDS B ADSs 2017 2017 2017 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS February 16, May 18, August 10, November 16, A and RDS B shares 2017 2017 2017 2017 February 17, May 19, August 11, November 17, Record date 2017 2017 2017 2017 Scrip reference share price February 23, May 25, August 17, November 23, announcement date 2017 2017 2017 2017 Closing of scrip election and currency election March 3, June 5, August 25, December 1, (See Note) 2017 2017 2017 2017 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents March 10, June 12, September 4, December 7, announcement date 2017 2017 2017 2017 March 27, June 26, September 18, December 20, Payment date 2017 2017 2017 2017
maywillow
01/11/2016
09:44
Http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/royal-dutch-shell-plc-2017-interim-dividend-timetable-599435741.html
grupo
18/10/2016
18:08
SHAME AS YOU KNOW MANY AFFECTED BY CAP EX REDUCTIONS RESULTING IN CASH FLOW AND P and L IMPACTS DUE TO THE OIL PRICE STUMPLE
waldron
18/10/2016
17:27
Waldron, I said I worked in the industry,,, am afraid I only look at the big ones,, have had fingers and toes burnt by RKH AMER igas BOR BPC and a few others
tony773
18/10/2016
11:32
Thanks Waldron.
willie33
18/10/2016
11:16
tony as our in house oil expert WHAT THINK YOU OF vallourec VK.PA
waldron
18/10/2016
11:11
willie33 18 Oct '16 - 10:50 - 127 of 128 0 0 Advice please, does Direct Line actually pay a dividend of 14% or is this wrong. Thanks. risky but nice YES IF ONE INCLUDES THE LUVERLY SPECIAL DIVI
waldron
18/10/2016
10:55
tony good luck draw up a list and intially use your oil industry expertise do try and make it fun as well as interesting whilst earning a return imagine your are a consultant cheers
waldron
18/10/2016
09:50
Advice please, does Direct Line actually pay a dividend of 14% or is this wrong. Thanks.
willie33
18/10/2016
09:34
Waldron, many thanks for your reply,
tony773
18/10/2016
09:24
Tony - suggest have a chat with a wealth manager to look after your portfolio on an discretionary basis, or, if you would prefer to DIY, advisory basis. Where they are particularly beneficial is that they have research teams at their disposal and access to markets and investments that are not generally found with execution only brokers. When you are reliant on equities for income, it is important that you also take advantage of your CGT allowances, tax free income and tax shelters. You might also wish to invest in forestry which has special treatment on income and IHT. Traditionally portfolio values under discretionary management double every 10 years (8% compound growth) after management fees are taken out and income re-invested. You should still aim for capital growth, but slightly higher income yield. As with everything, a good mix of equities across all sectors plus cash and some speculative holdings that can be easily dealt is better than single sector investments. Try and work out when extra cash is needed (holidays, major events etc) as well as assuming that there will be maintenance on any property or replacement of vehicles from time to time too. Then it is simply a case of building a buffer of cash over say 3 months to provide a regular distribution of cash to you.
erogenous jones
18/10/2016
09:04
WELCOME tony depends on your propensity to risk especially currency impact shares seems expensive at present certainly home in on blue chips portfolio paying resonable divi imo avoid funds will get back to you take care
waldron
18/10/2016
08:02
I must admit this thread is very good and very informative,,, well done to all, now that I have been paid off, ( oil industry ) I need income from shares as I am getting SFA from banking, so can you if you have time, give me a definitive list of shares / funds to have a go at regards and best wishes to you all
tony773
18/10/2016
07:28
Citywire Money > News Brexit boost to dividends may not last, report warns The pound's plummet since EU referendum increases value of overseas dividends by £2.5 billion but shareholder pay-outs look vulnerable. Markets Other markets FTSE 100Prev: 6947.55 ▲ 0.75%51.91 6999.469:10 AM 13:0017:0021:006,9856,9906,9957,000 Market Data Notice More market charts Favourites (0) Sign in for alerts Add funds, managers, shares and investment trusts to your Citywire favourite's list here. Register or Sign in, and we will email you when we have news on them. by Michelle McGagh on Oct 18, 2016 at 08:00 Brexit boost to dividends may not last, report warns Dividends have increased £2.5 billion due to the plunging pound, bringing cheer to income investors but the boost is not the full story. The weakness in sterling seen since the EU referendum saw dividends reach £24.9 billion in the third quarter, according to the latest Capita Dividend Monitor. The total amount of dividends paid out has risen 1.6% year-on-year to shrug off £2.2 billion in cuts that hit over the period, mainly from the mining sector. The underlying dividend total, excluding special dividends, increased 2.6% year-on-year to £23.9 billion. The increase in pay outs has come from the large dollar and euro-denominated dividends that are paid by multinationals such as Shell, HSBC and Unilever. When translated into sterling, the dividends become much more favourable and led to the £2.5 billion currency gain, far above the £1 billion predicted by Capita post-Brexit. Capita said it was the largest exchange rate effect in any quarter since the financial crisis when the pound slumped from over $2 in 2008 to $1.38 in 2009. Adding to the currency benefits was a final payment from drinks giant SAB Miller (SAB) + Add to favourites , which paid its dividend just before its acquisition of AB InBev. It paid a dividend of £1.2 billion in August, 28% higher than last year and although the large sum reflected the plunging pound, in dollar terms the dividend was still 8% higher. As oil prices continue to rise, oil producers also increased pay outs by 23%, with an additional £790 million ‘seemingly at odds with the sharp decline in profits at BP (BP) + Add to favourites and Shell (RDSA) + Add to favourites ’, said Capita. However, the increase was due mainly to the effects of the more generous dividends being paid by new Shell shares issued when it took over BG. While oil producers increased dividends, the biggest dent came from mining, with cuts from Glencore (GLEN) + Add to favourites , BHP Billiton (BLT) + Add to favourites , Rio Tinto (RIO) + Add to favourites and Anglo American (AAL) + Add to favourites . Collectively the companies aid out £1.9 billion, down 68% on last year despite a 20% boost from weak sterling. Capita said further cuts are still in the pipeline as the mining sector ‘rebases dividends to reflect the lower commodity prices, but the worst is now behind us’. Overall, 25 sectors increased payouts compared with the 14 that saw them fall, although those cutting dividends made a ‘disproportionately large impact’. Justin Cooper, chief executive of shareholder solution at Capita Asset Services, said investors are set for another currency windfall next quarter. ‘In the short term, the pound’s fall is super-charging UK dividends,’ he said. ‘We estimate that Q4 will see another currency windfall of almost £1.7 billion, taking the total for 2016 to over £5.6 billion.’ The expectation for increased dividends ‘explains why FTSE 100 share prices have been strong so far in the second half of 2016’, said Cooper, and ‘as the translated sterling value of cashflows earnings in foreign currencies rises, so the sterling value of share prices moves upwards in lock-step to reflect the devaluation of the pound’. Russ Mould, investment director at AJ Bell, the fund and pension broker, said ‘mathematically’ the Capita predictions for further windfalls were right as ‘40% of dividends are paid in US dollars’, such as Shell, BP and the large pharmaceutical stocks. On the surface, dividend payments look attractive but Capita said stripping out the positive affects of currency exchange reveals a disappointing picture, affected by high profile dividend cuts. Pay outs were actually 0.1% lower year-on-year in the third quarter as weak profitability in the UK’s largest companies and growing pension deficits made it difficult to increase dividends. Cooper said he expected more cuts in the fourth quarter and ‘without this devaluation…underlying dividends will fall in 2016’. The dividend landscape is being overshadowed by multinational companies and Cooper said ‘the UK’s largest companies are easily overshadowing better growth among the mid-caps’. Mid-cap dividends outperformed the top 100 again, continuing a two-year trend, rising 4.9% to £2.7 billion, compared to 0.9% growth in the top 100 companies. Capita said mid-cap companies have been ‘more insulated from the succession of negative trends to hit the profits of the top 100’, including weak commodity and oil prices, banking sector difficulties and supermarket price wars. Mould added that dividend growth ‘assumes that companies stick to their dividend plans and do not cut them’. Although currency is helping increase dividends, as is a rising oil price which is feeding dividends from BP and Shell – which between them make up a fifth of dividend payments in cash terms – Mould was concerned about dividend cover. He said dividend cover was ‘worryingly thin’ and 48% of FTSE 100 firms have earnings that cover their dividends by less than two times. ‘I think we have to be careful because dividend cover is very thin,’ he said. ‘Last year payout ratios as a percentage of net profits was at an all-time high of 75% when long-run you do not want to see that above 50%.’ Mould said he wanted to see dividend cover of 2.5x-plus as it ‘gives companies the slack to pay dividends in the long-term’ if there is a recession or problem within the company. ‘If you start with low dividend cover then there could be cuts [to the dividend if something goes wrong],’ said Mould. ‘We have seen 12 or more cuts in dividends in the past 18 months.’
waldron
17/10/2016
13:16
Sterling's fall super-charges dividend payments 13:15 17 Oct 2016 Dividend pay-outs rose 1.6% year-on-year in the third quarter, with FX gains more than offsetting a wave of big cuts by the miners Pound coins Simply put, mid-cap profits have outperformed those of the big boys, and that is enabling them to grow their dividends more rapidly, Capita said. It has been often been said that reinvesting dividends is the key to long-term investment success, so the good news is dividends are generally rising. Capita Asset Services, the share holding registrar services arm of Capita PLC, has released its dividend monitor for the third quarter, which showed dividend pay-outs were up 1.6% to £24.9bn. Strip out special dividends, and the increase is even larger: +2.6% at £23.9bn. Delve a bit deeper, however, and it becomes evident the figures are flattered by the pound’s weakness in the July-September quarter, which boosted pay-outs converted into sterling to the tune of £2.5bn. This more than offset the £2.2bn of dividend cuts that went through in the quarter, £1.9bn of them from companies in the mining sector, where the prolonged slump is really hitting earnings and cash reserves. According to Capita, around two-fifths of dividend payments are declared in US dollars or euros, so any “RemoanersR21; who also have a broad selection of dividend-paying stocks can take some solace in the fact that the EU referendum decision probably helped their dividend income. Capita points out that the Bank of England cut interest rates in August and further loosened its monetary policy, making dividend income look even more attractive to investors. With the FTSE 100 hitting new highs, the market’s yield has contracted to 3.6% from 3.7% in the second quarter, but compared to the rate available on the typical savings account, that is an attractive return, albeit one that is not guaranteed. “Weak profitability among the UK’s largest companies, including large losses for some, as well as growing pension deficits, has made it difficult for them to increase what they pay to their shareholders. The dominance of those huge multinationals is, however, obscuring more positive news from those lower down the rankings,” Capita cautioned. Payments from mining giants Glencore, BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto and Anglo American tumbled, despite being declared in foreign currency, and further cuts from the miners are still in the pipeline, Capita observed. Rolls-Royce’s dividend cut meant the aerospace sector’s reputation as a solid provider of income also took a knock. Overall, 25 sectors increased pay-outs compared to 14 that saw them fall, but those cutting dividends followed the advice given to batsmen wen playing limited overs cricket: if you are going to slash, slash hard. The top five companies by market value accounted for 36% of the total amount paid out in dividends, with Royal Dutch Shell (LON:RDSB) comfortably retaining its crown as king of the dividend payers: this year, Shell will account for a little over £1 in every £8 paid by UK-listed companies, Capita said. The 15 biggest companies accounted for almost two thirds of pay-outs, but if it is dividend growth you are chasing then the FTSE 250, rather than the FTSE 100, is the place to look. Dividends paid out by FTSE 100 companies rose 0.9% year-on-year to £21.7bn, while those paid out by FTSE 250 companies rose 4.9% to £2.7bn; stripping out special dividends, the year-on-year growth is an even more eye-catching 11.5%. Simply put, mid-cap profits have outperformed those of the big boys, and that is enabling them to grow their dividends more rapidly, Capita said. Looking ahead, Capita said the pound’s fall is super-charging UK dividend, and the registrar services provider predicted that the fourth quarter will see another currency windfall of just shy of £1.7bn, taking the total for 2016 to £5.6bn. “While exchange rate gains looks set to support UK PLC dividends well into 2017, investors will need a sustained improvement in company profitability in order for the true value of pay-outs to regain solid upward momentum,” Capita said, noting in passing that the weaker pound has already boosted confidence among exporters. Excluding special dividends, Capita now expects underlying pay-outs to reach £78.6bn, an increase of 2.7% year-on-year. “Without the devaluation of the pound, underlying dividends would have fallen in 2016. Indeed, the exchange rate remains the main source of uncertainty over dividends in the fourth quarter and into next year. If it continues to fall, 2016 will exceed even our newly revised forecast,” Capita said. John-H.jpg John Harrington
waldron
05/9/2016
17:13
THE HAGUE, the Netherlands, September 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") (NYSE: RDS.A)(NYSE: RDS.B) today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the second quarter 2016 interim dividend, which was announced on July 28, 2016 at US$0.47 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"). Dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euro at the rate of €0.4218 per A Share. Holders of A Shares who have validly submitted pounds sterling currency elections by August 26, 2016 will be entitled to a dividend of 35.27p per A Share. Dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling at the rate of 35.27p per B Share. Holders of B Shares who have validly submitted euro currency elections by August 26, 2016 will be entitled to a dividend of €0.4218 per B Share. This dividend will be payable on September 19, 2016 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on August 12, 2016.
waldron
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