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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc LSE:DIVI London Ordinary Share GB00B65TLW28 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -1.00 -0.85% 116.00 338,774 16:35:27
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
113.00 116.00 116.50 114.50 116.50
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 15.47 13.92 3.73 31.1 446
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
16:35:27 UT 224 116.00 GBX

Diverse Income (DIVI) Latest News (2)

Diverse Income News

Date Time Source Headline
22/10/202116:40UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Company Factsheet
22/10/202114:28UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
21/10/202113:41UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
20/10/202114:57UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
20/10/202113:12UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Result of AGM
20/10/202113:11UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Dividend Declaration
19/10/202113:01UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
18/10/202111:33UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
15/10/202114:24UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
14/10/202114:53UKREGDiverse Inc Trust Net Asset Value(s)
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23/10/202115:57DIVIDENDS: For those that are trying to keep what was already hard earned485
14/4/202108:12:::::: The Diverse Income Trust ::::::84
27/10/201519:12dividend dates2
03/12/201123:31GO FOR THE DIVIDEND.26
27/3/200915:03Dividend Question9

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23/10/2021
09:20
Diverse Income Daily Update: Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc is listed in the Equity Investment Instruments sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker DIVI. The last closing price for Diverse Income was 117p.
Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc has a 4 week average price of 110p and a 12 week average price of 110p.
The 1 year high share price is 122p while the 1 year low share price is currently 82p.
There are currently 384,299,106 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 218,950 shares. The market capitalisation of Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc is £445,786,962.96.
07/9/2021
22:33
waldron: Published in: Investing 7th September 2021 Tax on share dividends to increase by 1.25%. Here’s what it means for investors Updated: by Karl Talbot | 3 min read Tax on share dividends to increase by 1.25%. Here’s what it means for investors The government has announced a 1.25% increase in the tax on share dividends that will apply from April 2022. The news comes at the same time as it was announced that National Insurance contributions will increase by 1.25% next year. The government says the rises will help fund health and social care in England. Both announcements are subject to a vote in the House of Commons. So if you’re an investor, what does the new tax on share dividends mean for you? Here’s what you need to know. How much tax is currently paid on share dividends? If you’re an investor, you currently get a dividend allowance of £2,000. So, if you receive dividends worth £2,000 or less, you don’t have to pay any tax on them. For dividends of more than £2,000, the amount of tax you pay depends on your income tax band. This is unless your investments are held in an ISA, in which case your dividend payments remain tax free. For non-tax-efficient investments, you must pay 7.5% tax on any dividends over £2,000 if you’re a basic rate taxpayer. If you’re a higher rate taxpayer, you must pay 32.5%, and it’s 38.1% if you’re an additional rate taxpayer. You can find more information on income tax bands on the gov.uk website. What are the changes to dividends tax? From April 2022, the government is implementing a 1.25% rise in the tax on dividends to help fund social care. Analysts expect that the move will raise up to £600 million, with the majority of payers coming from the top 10% of households. The new tax will not, however, apply to investments held within an ISA. Why has dividends tax increased? With a National Insurance hike of 1.25% also announced, many analysts feel that the dividends tax is a way for the government to show that it is keen to increase taxes on asset holders as well as those who rely on a working income. Critics of the National Insurance hike have repeatedly pointed to the fact that it will not apply to most pensioners, landlords or those living off income from assets, suggesting that only those relying on a working income face the burden. National Insurance, by definition, is also a regressive tax, meaning that an increase disproportionately impacts those on lower incomes. That’s because the amount of contributions you have to make, at a percentage level, decreases at higher incomes. However, critics of the dividend tax rise consider it a token gesture. That’s because the 1.25% rise won’t apply to investments held in an ISA. How has industry reacted? Commenting on the changes, Tom Selby, head of retirement policy at AJ Bell, says that investors should now take the time to examine their portfolios in order to ensure they aren’t inadvertently paying more tax than they need to. He explains: “The increase in dividend tax means people investing outside tax-sheltered wrappers like pensions and ISAs should review their portfolios to make sure they are making as much use as possible of their annual contribution allowances to keep their tax bills as low as possible.” Will the tax increase definitely go ahead? MPs will vote on the government’s health and social care plan, including the planned dividends tax rise, on Wednesday 8 September at 7pm. While a number of cross-party MPs do not approve of the proposals, the policy is expected to pass through the House of Commons. MyWalletHero…
06/9/2021
09:44
la forge: Royal Dutch Shell plc second quarter 2021 Euro and GBP equivalent dividend payments Sep 6, 2021 The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc (“RDS”) today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the second quarter 2021 interim dividend, which was announced on July 29, 2021 at US$0.24 per A ordinary share (“A Share”) and B ordinary share (“B Share”). Dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros at the rate of €0.2024 per A Share. Holders of A Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or pounds sterling currency elections by August 27, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or 17.38p per A Share, respectively. Dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling at the rate of 17.38p per B Share. Holders of B Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or euros currency elections by August 27, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or €0.2024 per B Share, respectively. Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from 1 September to 3 September, 2021. This dividend will be payable on September 20, 2021 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on August 13, 2021. Taxation - cash dividend Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor.
29/7/2021
07:42
waldron: The Hague, July 29, 2021 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS" or the "Company") today announced an interim dividend in respect of the second quarter of 2021 of US$ 0.24 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"). Chair of the Board of Royal Dutch Shell, Sir Andrew Mackenzie commented: "Shell's proven and sustainable cash generation across a range of macroeconomic scenarios has provided the Board confidence to increase shareholder distributions. As a result, the Board has decided to rebase the dividend per share to 24 US cents from the second quarter 2021 onwards." Details relating to the second quarter 2021 interim dividend Per ordinary share Q2 2021 RDS A Shares (US$) 0.24 RDS B Shares (US$) 0.24 It is expected that cash dividends on the B Shares will be paid via the Dividend Access Mechanism and will have a UK source for UK and Dutch tax purposes. Cash dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros, although holders of A Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in US dollars or pounds sterling. Cash dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling, although holders of B Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in US dollars or euros. The pound sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments will be announced on September 6, 2021. Per ADS Q2 2021 RDS A ADSs (US$) 0.48 RDS B ADSs (US$) 0.48 Cash dividends on American Depository Shares ("ADSs") will be paid, by default, in US dollars. RDS A and B ADSs are listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols RDS.A and RDS.B, respectively. Each ADS represents two ordinary shares, two A Shares in the case of RDS.A or two B Shares in the case of RDS.B. ADSs are evidenced by an American Depositary Receipt (ADR) certificate. In many cases the terms ADR and ADS are used interchangeably. Dividend timetable for the second quarter 2021 interim dividend Event Date Announcement date July 29, 2021 Ex- Dividend Date for ADS.A and ADS.B August 12, 2021 Ex- Dividend Date for RDS A and RDS B August 12, 2021 Record date August 13, 2021 Closing of currency election date (see Note August 27, 2021 below) Pound sterling and euro equivalents announcement September 6, 2021 date Payment date September 20, 2021 Note A different currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Taxation - cash dividends Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor. Dividend Reinvestment Programmes ("DRIP") The following organisations operate Dividend Reinvestment Plans ("DRIPs") which enable RDS shareholders to elect to have their dividend payments used to purchase RDS shares of the same class as those already held by them: -- Equiniti Financial Services Limited ("EFSL"), for those holding shares (a) directly on the register as certificate holder or as CREST Member and (b) via the Nominee Service; -- ABN-AMRO NV ("ABN") for Financial Intermediaries holding A shares or B shares via Euroclear Nederland; -- JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. ("JPM") for holders of A and B American Depository Shares; and -- Other DRIPs may also be available from the intermediary through which investors hold their shares. Such organisations provide their DRIPs fully on their account and not on behalf of Royal Dutch Shell plc. Interested parties should contact DRIP Offerors directly. More information can be found at https://www.shell.com/drip To be eligible for the next dividend, shareholders must make a valid dividend reinvestment election before the published date for the close of elections. (END) Dow Jones Newswires
08/7/2021
19:18
waldron: These UK stocks are expected to pay bumper dividends – but beware of broken promises, research says Published Thu, Jul 8 20214:33 AM EDT Elliot Smith @ElliotSmithCNBC Key Points AJ Bell highlighted in a report Wednesday that investors will need to look carefully at the 10 firms expected to yield the highest payouts to shareholders this year, since several of them have a record of being forced to cut dividends during challenging times. Rio Tinto is the highest-yielding individual stock in the FTSE 100, with an expected yield of 12%, followed by BHP at 9.2%, Imperial Brands at 8.7% and Evraz at 8.5%. LONDON — Total FTSE 100 dividend payments are expected to rise by a quarter this year to £76.9 billion ($106.3 million), meaning the U.K.’s leading index is set to yield 3.7% for 2021, according to data aggregated by British stockbroker AJ Bell. Meanwhile the index’s average dividend coverage ratio, which measures the number of times a company can pay dividends to its shareholders, has improved to 1.83x, its highest level since 2014. To supplement the higher dividends, many FTSE 100 companies have begun to announce share buybacks. A total of twelve firms have so far announced buybacks to the aggregate tune of £7.2 billion: Barclays, Berkeley, BP, CRH, Diageo, Ferguson, NatWest, Rightmove, Sage, Standard Chartered, Unilever and Vodafone. Share buybacks are when a company purchases its own shares from the open market, driving up the share price. AJ Bell highlighted in a report Wednesday that investors will need to look carefully at the 10 firms expected to yield the highest payouts to shareholders this year, since several of them have a record of being forced to cut dividends during challenging times. Top 10 yielders Rio Tinto is the highest-yielding individual stock in the FTSE 100, with an expected yield of 12%, followed by BHP at 9.2%, Imperial Brands at 8.7% and Evraz at 8.5%. “Forecast of yields in the region of 10% may make investors a little wary, given the shocking record of firms previously expected to generate such bumper returns, including Vodafone, Shell, Evraz itself and – when they were still in the FTSE 100 – Royal Mail, Marks & Spencer and Centrica,” said AJ Bell Investment Director Russ Mould. “All were forecast to generate a yield in excess of 10% at one stage or another and all cut the dividend instead.” UK small-cap stocks to continue to benefit in the coming months, strategist says Mould added that China’s reported discontent with surging iron ore prices may lead some investors to question the likelihood of such a bumper payment from Rio Tinto. Analyst consensus does not anticipate a repeat performance in 2022, he pointed out. The remaining companies in the top 10 are Persimmon (7.7%), Admiral Group (7.6%), M&G (7.5%), British American Tobacco (7.5%), Anglo American (7.2%) and Phoenix Group (6.9%). Miners and banks also dominate the list of 10 companies expected to make the biggest individual contribution to the £15.3 billion total increase in FTSE 100 dividends this year, the report highlighted, with HSBC, Barclays, Lloyds and NatWest all featuring. ‘Dividend aristocrats’ Mould suggested that investors will need to assess concentration risk — the danger of having too much exposure to a particular sector or type of stock — when it comes to dividends as well as earnings, an issue often associated with seeking income from the U.K. stock market. He also highlighted that historically, the highest-yielding stocks do not prove to be the best long-term investments. “Often defending a high yield can be a burden for a firm, as it sucks cash away from vital investment in the underlying business, or can be a sign that the company is in trouble and investors are demanding such a high yield to compensate themselves for the (perceived) risks associated with owning the equity,” Mould said. BlackRock: Neutral on U.S. stocks, likes cyclicals, Europe and Japan markets “The strongest long-term performance often comes from those firms that have the best long-term dividend growth record, as they provide the dream combination of higher dividends and a higher share price – the increased distribution will over time drag the share price higher through sheer force.” The FTSE 100 currently has 15 firms which can evidence a 10-year dividend growth track record, with nine firms having dropped off that list since the pandemic. Industrial equipment rental company Ashtead tops the list, with a total return of 3,425.4% between 2011 and 2020, followed by Intermediate Capital at 1,031.1% and the London Stock Exchange at 991.2%. The firms, which Mould dubs “dividend aristocrats,” are: Scottish Mortgage (865%), Spirax-Sarco (734.8%), Halma (703.4%), Croda (369.4%), RELX (368.6%), DCC (311.8%), Diageo (259.2%), Hargreaves Lansdown (258.7%), United Utilities (175.2%), National Grid (163.5%), Sage (94%) and British American Tobacco (69.9%).
09/6/2020
19:35
waldron: Is Shell’s Dividend Cut Permanent? Join Our Community Investors were more than annoyed when Royal Dutch Shell slashed its dividend by two thirds. Just last year, the giant oil company announced its plan to pay out huge dividends over the coming five years. Actually, the investors used stronger terms than “annoyed.̶1; They had reason to be annoyed after the strong commitment to the dividend, but maybe they should have previously shown a greater skepticism about the ability of any management to make such a commitment. Times change and perhaps no managements or boards should publicly commit to actions so far ahead of time. Royal Dutch Shell has a reputation for forward planning. And dividend policy, which is supposed to reflect management’s best long term projections is not something that is trifled with lightly. So what does the significant dividend cut say? Management offered two explanations: 1) it was unwise to pay a dividend that would not be earned. i.e. that would require borrowing to sustain. That would reduce the resilience (a favorite word nowadays) of the company. Royal Dutch Shell, however, has the borrowing power and resources to pay an unearned dividend as well as carry out other activities during a short period of difficulties. We could see cash flow of $35 billion and capital expenditures of $20 billion during a bad year, which leaves just enough to pay the annual dividend of $15 billion. An optimistic management would not see this as a problem at all. But a 66% dividend reduction suggests less than optimistic hopes for a sharp rebound in demand. Or perhaps instead that increasingly volatile global oil market conditions may become the new normal, therefore making a large dividend imprudent. Management added another explanation, though: 2) The company also needed the cash resources of the dividend to shift to a position of net zero carbon emissions by 2050. This seems to have puzzled investors even more than concerns about profound future market volatility. Royal Dutch Shell’s management did not explain how cash conserved in this manner would be profitably redeployed to reach this goal. The collateral issue for investors is how seriously to take management’s guidance which assumes a financial policy continuity for many decades in the future long after the retirements of current senior management and directors. Related: China Set To Ramp Up Natural Gas Imports This Decade Royal Dutch Shell could cease investing in new oil properties, sell off what it owns and put the money into non-fossil energy or just return the cash to its investors. That would get it into a net zero position sooner. Or it could wind down its oil businesses gradually and liquidate the company by paying out dividends rather than retain the money. But with so much money going into the development of oil properties, it is difficult for outsiders to evaluate the company’s new direction, which seems to be: “We want to go green, but not quite yet.” This ambivalence about capital investment direction puts investors in an uncomfortable position. Those looking for steady, high yields have been served notice. They can no longer depend on this sector for above average dividend yields. More risk tolerant growth investors may also become reticent about a business gradually losing market share in an energy market that is itself slow growing. Investors who want exposure to the renewables market will not likely do so via investment in oil companies that increasingly own renewables. In this respect oil companies at this stage don’t bring much to the table except their money. And there is plenty of that around from other sources. Also the environmental-social-governance (ESG) investor movement is growing in importance. And this vocal group is decidedly anti oil and all other fossil fuels. Back in the day portfolio managers catering to yield oriented investors could say, “Yeah, those oil companies are big time polluters but where else can you get 500 or 600 basis points over the risk free rate? Well with this dividend cut that argument just went out the window. Almost five decades ago, the US electric utility industry had a reputation for rock-solid common stock dividends with above average yields. But power plants, especially those located on the east and west coasts, were at that time heavily fueled by cheap oil from the Middle East. Suddenly this formerly cheap fuel first became scarce and then far more expensive. New York’s own Consolidated Edison Company found itself heavily exposed in the early 1970s and did the unthinkable, omitting its dividend. That was the icebreaker so to speak. Others followed. The key takeaway, to us, is that after the Con Ed dividend cut, yield oriented investors looked at electric utilities differently. They could no longer rely on a dividend even during times of stress. We wonder if, in a similar way, Royal Dutch Shell’s dividend action has similarly broken the ice. By Leonard Hyman and William Tilles for Oilprice.com
17/6/2019
10:24
the grumpy old men: MONEY OBSERVER Vodafone dividend cut highlights need for new approach to income investing The telecoms company’s dividend cut ended a two-decade run of rising payouts. Chris McVey suggests three key issues for equity income investors to consider. June 17, 2019 by Chris McVey Share on: As you may have read last month, Vodafone announced that it was cutting its dividend, despite the board having recommitted to it six months earlier. Vodafone’s cut ends a two-decade run of rising payouts. It also highlights three important issues that equity income investors need to keep in mind. The good news is that investors can mitigate this risk by diversifying the types of income funds they hold, and being aware of three key issues. Vodafone dividend cut: which UK shares might be next? 1) High dividend yields can mean low dividend cover If you hold a stock for its dividend, you want to be confident that the company can keep paying it. Ideally you want to see dividend cover of 2.0 or above, which means profits are enough to cover the payout twice over. In the case of Vodafone, dividend cover was less than 1.0 just before the announcement of its dividend cut. This is clearly unsustainable over the long term, so we shouldn’t be too surprised that Vodafone acted as it did. What it should draw our attention to is the fact that among the big dividend payers, the average dividend cover is significantly below that 2.0 mark. If we look at the 10 FTSE 100 companies that pay the most money out to shareholders, their average dividend cover is less than 1.5. If we look at the top 10 FTSE 100 companies by dividend yield, the figure is just 1.2. 2) Popular income stocks can have below-average dividend growth Many of the big blue-chip dividend payers have reached a stage in their maturity where earnings and dividend growth have slowed. If we take the top 10 companies by total dividend payout and strip out BP and Royal Dutch Shell (because oil price moves make their earnings more volatile), we see that on average their earnings and dividends are expected to grow more slowly than the FTSE All-Share average over the period from the end of 2017 up until 2020. 3) Concentration risk In the run-up to its dividend cut, Vodafone was one of the FTSE 100’s top 10 dividend payers, by both dividend yield and by the total amount that it paid to shareholders. In fact, the top 10 biggest dividend payers accounted for more than half the dividends paid by FTSE 100 companies in 2018. Now consider the fact that three-quarters of traditional income funds hold those stocks, and you’ll see why equity income investors need to have an eye on concentration risk. They may want to consider adding a different type of fund to their portfolio for diversification. A different approach It would be complacent to assume that Vodafone will turn out to be an isolated case. So where can income investors find diversification? Last December, we launched the FP Octopus UK Multi Cap Income Fund, which invests in companies across the entire market cap spectrum, drawing on our longstanding smaller companies’ expertise. This approach has allowed us to seek out companies with sustainable dividends, which have above-average earnings and dividends growth, and that tend not to appear among the holdings of more traditional equity income funds. The experience of Vodafone shows that while a household name and impressive past performance may feel comforting, investors need to consider diversification, particularly if income is important. Chris McVey is a senior fund manager and head of the FP Octopus UK Multi Cap Income Fund, Octopus Investments.
28/5/2019
12:59
sarkasm: Tuesday 28 May 2019 11:08am Interactive Investor Talk What is City Talk? Latest Vodafone dividend cut: which UK shares might be next? Share Interactive Investor Talk Contributor Vodafone dividend cut: which UK shares might be next? (Source: iStock) By Tom Bailey from interactive investor. Vodafone's cut might be a canary in the coalmine for FTSE 100 shares. Over the past year the market has increasingly cooled on Vodafone (LSE:VOD). The company has a long list of problems, including the high cost of 5G investment, being squeezed by competition on the continent and high levels of debt. The company's share price fell by roughly 30% between April 2018 and April 2019. As a result, the company's dividend yield shot up to a seemingly generous 9%. Now, however, reality has caught up with the company's payout level. On Wednesday 15 May, Vodafone announce its dividend would be cut by 40%, giving it a new yield of around 6%. According to Simon McGarry, senior equity research analyst, Canaccord Genuity Wealth Management: "The red flags have been there for all to see - the dividend yield was dangerously high, low dividend coverage (ratio of earnings to dividends) and dividend growth had slowed - last year growth was only 2% and in its recent statement, there was no growth at all." The share has consistently featured on our Dividend Danger Zone screen since its creation in 2016. A number of high-profile investors had previously grown concerned about Vodafone's position. Mike Fox, manager of Royal London Sustainable Leaders fund recently told Money Observer that he had sold his stake in the company. Similarly, Robin Geffen, chief executive of Neptune Investment Management, sold out of Vodafone last year. Vodafone, however, isn't likely to be the only major UK company seeing a dividend cut in the coming months. The dividend payouts for a number of FTSE companies currently look perilous. According to Geffen: "Vodafone's announcement should be viewed as a canary in the coalmine moment for UK equity income investors" Geffen fears that many other supposedly "safe" dividend-paying companies are also likely to face a cut, citing falling levels of dividend cover as his key concern. He adds: "We would put the tobacco majors Imperial Brands (LSE:IMB) and British American Tobacco (LSE:BATS), BT Group (LSE:BT.A) and the major utilities stocks in that category." British American Tobacco currently has a dividend cover of 1.35 times, Imperial Brands 0.87 times and BT 1.47 times. As a rule of thumb, shares with a dividend cover score of above 2 are considered reliable dividend payers. Meanwhile, a number of companies on our Dividend Danger Zone screen all have dangerously low dividend covers. The worst offender is Stobart Group (LSE:STOB), with a dividend cover of 0.5 times. That means that half of its dividend is being paid for with borrowing. The infrastructure and support services company already cut its dividend last December, citing a lack of cash. Further cuts, it seems, may still be ahead. Hammerson (LSE:HMSO), the property group, is also on the screen, with a particularly high net debt to EBITDA ratio of 10.9 times. This was one of the reasons it entered our screen in March. At the time, McGarry noted that the company was attempting to sell off assets to cut its debt burden. But, he warned: "Hammerson might struggle to deliver its strategy to dispose of retail parks in a bid to reduce leverage, which is too high at 40%+ loan-to-value." The company's dividend cover is currently 1.1 times. Also on the screen is SSE (LSE:SSE), with a dividend cover of 1.2 times. Similarly, Geffen is bearish on the dividend prospect of the utility sector as a whole, noting his is the only IA UK Equity Income Fund to have 0% exposure to utilities. The sector has an average cover of 1.29 times. This article was originally published in our sister magazine Money Observer.
02/2/2017
07:41
waldron: Royal Dutch Shell Shell Fourth Quarter 2016 Interim Dividend 02/02/2017 7:06am UK Regulatory (RNS & others) TIDMRDSA TIDMRDSB ROYAL DUTCH SHELL PLC FOURTH QUARTER 2016 INTERIM DIVID The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") today announced an interim dividend in respect of the fourth quarter of 2016 of US$0.47 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"), equal to the US dollar dividend for the same quarter last year. The Board expects that the first quarter 2017 interim dividend will be US$0.47, equal to the US dollar dividend for the same quarter in the previous year. The first quarter 2017 interim dividend is scheduled to be announced on May 4, 2017. RDS provides eligible shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via a Scrip Dividend Programme ("the Programme"). For further details please see below. Details relating to the fourth quarter 2016 interim dividend It is expected that cash dividends on the B Shares will be paid via the Dividend Access Mechanism from UK-sourced income of the Shell Group. Per ordinary share Q4 2016 RDS A Shares (US$) 0.47 RDS B Shares (US$) 0.47 Cash dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euro, although holders of A Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in pounds sterling. Cash dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling, although holders of B Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in euro. The pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments will be announced on March 10, 2017. Per ADS Q4 2016 RDS A ADSs (US$) 0.94 RDS B ADSs (US$) 0.94 Cash dividends on American Depository Shares ("ADSs") will be paid, by default, in US dollars. ADS stands for an American Depositary Share. ADR stands for an American Depositary Receipt. An ADR is a certificate that evidences ADSs. ADSs are listed on the NYSE under the symbols RDS.A and RDS.B. Each ADS represents two ordinary shares, two A Shares in the case of RDS.A or two B Shares in the case of RDS.B. In many cases the terms ADR and ADS are used interchangeably. Scrip Dividend Programme RDS provides shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via the Programme. Under the Programme shareholders can increase their shareholding in RDS by choosing to receive new shares instead of cash dividends, if approved by the Board. Only new A Shares will be issued under the Programme, including to shareholders who currently hold B Shares. In some countries, joining the Programme may currently offer a tax advantage compared with receiving cash dividends. In particular, dividends paid out as shares by the Company will not be subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax (currently 15 per cent), unlike cash dividends paid on A shares, and they will not generally be taxed on receipt by a UK shareholder or a Dutch shareholder. Shareholders who elect to join the Programme will increase the number of shares held in RDS without having to buy existing shares in the market, thereby avoiding associated dealing costs. Shareholders who do not join the Programme will continue to receive in cash any dividends approved by the Board. Shareholders who held only B Shares and joined the Programme are reminded they will need to make a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of their new A Shares if they wish to join the Programme in respect of such new shares. However, this is only necessary if the shareholder has not previously made a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of any new A Shares issued. For further information on the Programme, including how to join if you are eligible, please refer to the appropriate publication available on www.shell.com/scrip. Dividend timetable for the fourth quarter 2016 interim dividend Announcement date February 2, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B ADSs February 15, 2017 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares February 16, 2017 Record date February 17, 2017 Scrip reference share price announcement February 23, 2017 date Closing of scrip election and currency March 3, 2017 election (See Note) Pounds sterling and euro equivalents March 10, 2017 announcement date Payment date March 27, 2017 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Taxation - cash dividends Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Based on a policy statement issued by the Dutch Ministry of Finance on April 29, 2016 (which has been formalised in law with effect from January 2017), and depending on their particular circumstances, non-Dutch resident shareholders may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax. Furthermore, in April 2016, there were changes to the UK taxation of dividends. The dividend tax credit has been abolished, and a new tax free dividend allowance of GBP5,000 introduced. Dividend income in excess of the allowance will be taxable at the following rates: 7.5% within the basic rate band; 32.5% within the higher rate band; and 38.1% on dividend income taxable at the additional rate. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your own tax advisor. Royal Dutch Shell plc The Hague, February 2, 2017 Contacts: - Investor Relations: Europe + 31 (0) 70 377 4540; North America +1 832 337 2034 - Media: International +44 (0) 207 934 5550; Americas +1 713 241 4544
18/10/2016
08:28
waldron: Citywire Money > News Brexit boost to dividends may not last, report warns The pound's plummet since EU referendum increases value of overseas dividends by £2.5 billion but shareholder pay-outs look vulnerable. Markets Other markets FTSE 100Prev: 6947.55 ▲ 0.75%51.91 6999.469:10 AM 13:0017:0021:006,9856,9906,9957,000 Market Data Notice More market charts Favourites (0) Sign in for alerts Add funds, managers, shares and investment trusts to your Citywire favourite's list here. Register or Sign in, and we will email you when we have news on them. by Michelle McGagh on Oct 18, 2016 at 08:00 Brexit boost to dividends may not last, report warns Dividends have increased £2.5 billion due to the plunging pound, bringing cheer to income investors but the boost is not the full story. The weakness in sterling seen since the EU referendum saw dividends reach £24.9 billion in the third quarter, according to the latest Capita Dividend Monitor. The total amount of dividends paid out has risen 1.6% year-on-year to shrug off £2.2 billion in cuts that hit over the period, mainly from the mining sector. The underlying dividend total, excluding special dividends, increased 2.6% year-on-year to £23.9 billion. The increase in pay outs has come from the large dollar and euro-denominated dividends that are paid by multinationals such as Shell, HSBC and Unilever. When translated into sterling, the dividends become much more favourable and led to the £2.5 billion currency gain, far above the £1 billion predicted by Capita post-Brexit. Capita said it was the largest exchange rate effect in any quarter since the financial crisis when the pound slumped from over $2 in 2008 to $1.38 in 2009. Adding to the currency benefits was a final payment from drinks giant SAB Miller (SAB) + Add to favourites , which paid its dividend just before its acquisition of AB InBev. It paid a dividend of £1.2 billion in August, 28% higher than last year and although the large sum reflected the plunging pound, in dollar terms the dividend was still 8% higher. As oil prices continue to rise, oil producers also increased pay outs by 23%, with an additional £790 million ‘seemingly at odds with the sharp decline in profits at BP (BP) + Add to favourites and Shell (RDSA) + Add to favourites ’, said Capita. However, the increase was due mainly to the effects of the more generous dividends being paid by new Shell shares issued when it took over BG. While oil producers increased dividends, the biggest dent came from mining, with cuts from Glencore (GLEN) + Add to favourites , BHP Billiton (BLT) + Add to favourites , Rio Tinto (RIO) + Add to favourites and Anglo American (AAL) + Add to favourites . Collectively the companies aid out £1.9 billion, down 68% on last year despite a 20% boost from weak sterling. Capita said further cuts are still in the pipeline as the mining sector ‘rebases dividends to reflect the lower commodity prices, but the worst is now behind us’. Overall, 25 sectors increased payouts compared with the 14 that saw them fall, although those cutting dividends made a ‘disproportionately large impact’. Justin Cooper, chief executive of shareholder solution at Capita Asset Services, said investors are set for another currency windfall next quarter. ‘In the short term, the pound’s fall is super-charging UK dividends,’ he said. ‘We estimate that Q4 will see another currency windfall of almost £1.7 billion, taking the total for 2016 to over £5.6 billion.’ The expectation for increased dividends ‘explains why FTSE 100 share prices have been strong so far in the second half of 2016’, said Cooper, and ‘as the translated sterling value of cashflows earnings in foreign currencies rises, so the sterling value of share prices moves upwards in lock-step to reflect the devaluation of the pound’. Russ Mould, investment director at AJ Bell, the fund and pension broker, said ‘mathematically’ the Capita predictions for further windfalls were right as ‘40% of dividends are paid in US dollars’, such as Shell, BP and the large pharmaceutical stocks. On the surface, dividend payments look attractive but Capita said stripping out the positive affects of currency exchange reveals a disappointing picture, affected by high profile dividend cuts. Pay outs were actually 0.1% lower year-on-year in the third quarter as weak profitability in the UK’s largest companies and growing pension deficits made it difficult to increase dividends. Cooper said he expected more cuts in the fourth quarter and ‘without this devaluation…underlying dividends will fall in 2016’. The dividend landscape is being overshadowed by multinational companies and Cooper said ‘the UK’s largest companies are easily overshadowing better growth among the mid-caps’. Mid-cap dividends outperformed the top 100 again, continuing a two-year trend, rising 4.9% to £2.7 billion, compared to 0.9% growth in the top 100 companies. Capita said mid-cap companies have been ‘more insulated from the succession of negative trends to hit the profits of the top 100’, including weak commodity and oil prices, banking sector difficulties and supermarket price wars. Mould added that dividend growth ‘assumes that companies stick to their dividend plans and do not cut them’. Although currency is helping increase dividends, as is a rising oil price which is feeding dividends from BP and Shell – which between them make up a fifth of dividend payments in cash terms – Mould was concerned about dividend cover. He said dividend cover was ‘worryingly thin’ and 48% of FTSE 100 firms have earnings that cover their dividends by less than two times. ‘I think we have to be careful because dividend cover is very thin,’ he said. ‘Last year payout ratios as a percentage of net profits was at an all-time high of 75% when long-run you do not want to see that above 50%.’ Mould said he wanted to see dividend cover of 2.5x-plus as it ‘gives companies the slack to pay dividends in the long-term’ if there is a recession or problem within the company. ‘If you start with low dividend cover then there could be cuts [to the dividend if something goes wrong],’ said Mould. ‘We have seen 12 or more cuts in dividends in the past 18 months.’
04/5/2016
07:54
waldron: Royal Dutch Shell RDS Q1 2016 Dividend Announcement 04/05/2016 6:00am UK Regulatory (RNS & others) TIDMRDSA TIDMRDSB ROYAL DUTCH SHELL PLC FIRST QUARTER 2016 INTERIM DIVIDEND The Hague, May 4, 2016 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") today announced an interim dividend in respect of the first quarter of 2016 of US$0.47 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share"), equal to the US dollar dividend for the same quarter last year. RDS provides eligible shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via a Scrip Dividend Programme ("the Programme"). For further details please see below. Details relating to the first quarter 2016 interim dividend It is expected that cash dividends on the B Shares will be paid via the Dividend Access Mechanism from UK-sourced income of the Shell Group. Per ordinary share Q1 2016 RDS A Shares (US$) 0.47 RDS B Shares (US$) 0.47 Cash dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euro, although holders of A Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in pounds sterling. Cash dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling, although holders of B Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in euro. The pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments will be announced on June 13, 2016. Per ADS Q1 2016 RDS A ADSs (US$) 0.94 RDS B ADSs (US$) 0.94 Cash dividends on American Depository Shares ("ADSs") will be paid, by default, in US dollars. ADS stands for an American Depositary Share. ADR stands for an American Depositary Receipt. An ADR is a certificate that evidences ADSs. ADSs are listed on the NYSE under the symbols RDS.A and RDS.B. Each ADS represents two ordinary shares, two A Shares in the case of RDS.A or two B Shares in the case of RDS.B. In many cases the terms ADR and ADS are used interchangeably. Scrip Dividend Programme RDS provides shareholders with a choice to receive dividends in cash or in shares via the Programme. Under the Programme shareholders can increase their shareholding in RDS by choosing to receive new shares instead of cash dividends, if approved by the Board. Only new A Shares will be issued under the Programme, including to shareholders who currently hold B Shares. In some countries, joining the Programme may currently offer a tax advantage compared with receiving cash dividends. In particular, dividends paid out as shares by the Company will not be subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax (currently 15 per cent), unlike cash dividends paid on A shares, and they will not generally be taxed on receipt by a UK shareholder or a Dutch shareholder. Shareholders who elect to join the Programme will increase the number of shares held in RDS without having to buy existing shares in the market, thereby avoiding associated dealing costs. Shareholders who do not join the Programme will continue to receive in cash any dividends approved by the Board. Shareholders who held only B Shares and joined the Programme are reminded they will need to make a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of their new A Shares if they wish to join the Programme in respect of such new shares. However, this is only necessary if the shareholder has not previously made a Scrip Dividend Election in respect of any new A Shares issued. For further information on the Programme, including how to join if you are eligible, please refer to the appropriate publication available on www.shell.com/scrip. Dividend timetable for the first quarter 2016 interim dividend Announcement date May 4, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B ADS May 18, 2016 Ex-dividend date RDS A and RDS B shares May 19, 2016 Record date May 20, 2016 Scrip reference share price announcement date May 26, 2016 Closing of scrip election and currency election (See Note) June 6, 2016 Pounds sterling and euro equivalents announcement date June 13, 2016 Payment date June 27, 2016 Note Both a different scrip and currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. A different scrip election date may apply to registered and non-registered ADS holders. Registered ADS holders can contact The Bank of New York Mellon for the election deadline that applies. Non-registered ADS holders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies. Taxation - cash dividends Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. In April 2016, there were changes to the UK taxation of dividends. The dividend tax credit has been abolished, and a new tax free dividend allowance of GBP5,000 introduced. Dividend income in excess of the allowance will be taxable at the following rates: 7.5% within the basic rate band; 32.5% within the higher rate band; and 38.1% on dividend income taxable at the additional rate. If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your own tax advisor. Royal Dutch Shell plc Contacts: - Investor Relations: Europe + 31 (0) 70 377 4540; North America +1 832 337 2034 - Media: International +44 (0) 207 934 5550; Americas +1 713 241 4544
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