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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc LSE:DIVI London Ordinary Share GB00B65TLW28 ORD 0.1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -2.00 -2.08% 94.00 108,033 16:35:23
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
93.00 95.00 94.80 94.20 94.80
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Equity Investment Instruments 16.51 14.76 4.01 23.4 361
Last Trade Time Trade Type Trade Size Trade Price Currency
16:29:15 AT 3,319 94.20 GBX

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Posted at 29/1/2023 08:20 by Diverse Income Daily Update
Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc is listed in the Equity Investment Instruments sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker DIVI. The last closing price for Diverse Income was 96p.
Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc has a 4 week average price of 90.20p and a 12 week average price of 86.40p.
The 1 year high share price is 115p while the 1 year low share price is currently 82p.
There are currently 384,299,106 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 306,603 shares. The market capitalisation of Diverse Income Trust (the) Plc is £361,241,159.64.
Posted at 27/12/2022 11:23 by spangle93
Just a note to reinforce Divmad/Bluemango's recommendation of I3E, where I'm lucky enough to have an average purchase price of 8p, so my effective dividend is 25% :-)

The board stated on 22 Dec "As part of the i3's commitment to its total return model, the Company is increasing its 2023 minimum dividend by 59.4% above the total dividends paid during 2022 to £ 24.475 million, through an increased monthly dividend of 0.171 p/share - equating to an annual dividend of 2.052 p/share"

I3E drilled an appraisal well in the North Sea in October this year. Unfortunately it did not prove an extension of an existing discovery, which affected the share price. Looking into 2023, there are no single well events of a similar magnitude - the company will progress the North Sea discovery towards a field development well that ties the original exploration back to third party infrastructure. However I3E is all about exploitation of, and production from, onshore resources in western Alberta, where is has sizeable acreage in new conventional plays that offer good rates of return, and where its inventory of hundreds of wells means that no one well will wildly affect the share price

Note: MINIMUM dividend. In 2022 the moonthly dividend was raised during the year.


Elsewhere in the hydrocarbons space DEC continues to offer a stable, rising quarterly dividend. I'm sure CASSINI would have brought it to people's attention. DEC is unique in oil and gas in that it makes its money from managing the decline of mature wells in the US, and operating infrastructure, rather than exploring for new finds, or developing discoveries. The latest quarter is 4.375 US cents, which would be 17.5c annualised (14.5p at $1.2 = £1). Current share price is 117p, so that's a nominal dividend of 12.4%. I am SO going to get shouted out here, but the majority of brokers and investors believe that this is subject to a withholding tax of 30%, or 15% if held in an ISA, or 0% if held in a SIPP. You'd also need to complete a W-8BEN form


One wildly left field oiler, which has so many red flags that it could be a May Day procession in Moscow, is CASP. Who? CASP. CASP has recently announced a maiden dividend, which turned out to be rather larger than any BB expert was imagining.

"The size of this maiden dividend is indicative of the levels to be expected in the future. The Board intends that the future dividends will be paid on a monthly basis, based on the higher of £1 million per month or a pay-out ratio of broadly 35-40% of free cashflows."

This equates to a distribution of 0.0444 pence/share, which has been succeeded by a second monthly dividend of the same magnitude.

CASP is on AIM and operates in Kazakhstan. The CEO and members of his family own a significant majority of the shares. Its communications with retail shareholders, and engagement with them, would not get a good rating on booking.com. RNS's are written by a mouthpiece for the company - the chairman - who is an accountant, so technical details often make no sense. Although Kaz isn't subject to sanctions, its oil export route is through the Urals so it's effectively treated as such the international price it can get for its oil is much lower than Brent.

HOWEVER, the concert party wants a return from the company, and now they are producing over 2000 bopd, they can pay dividends. If the monthly dividends continue, then at a share price around 4p, the annualised dividend would be 13.3%


Disclaimer - I hold each of these shares

Posted at 13/12/2022 10:33 by waldron
Https://www.dividendmax.com/united-kingdom/london-stock-exchange/investment-trusts/digital-9-infrastructure-plc/dividends

PAYS A QUARTERLY DIVI WHICH HAS JUST BEEN PAID

CANNOT FIND MENTION ON ORANGE INVESTMENT

APPARENTLY Digital 9 is set to join the FTSE 250 index on December 19.

Thanks for your post Peter

enjoy yer day

chuckle and cheers

take care

By the way my portfolios only hold swiss franc and euro denominated shares

Posted at 17/11/2022 14:57 by florenceorbis
Autumn Statement 22: 'Double whammy against investors' with hit on dividend and CGT allowances
Employers' NICs threshold frozen
Valeria Martinez

17 November 2022 • 2 min read

The government is halving the dividend tax allowance, Chancellor Jeremy Hunt has announced, falling from £2,000 to £1,000 next year and to £500 from 2024.

The dividend allowance was introduced to help savers in 2017, explained Shaun Moore, financial planning expert at Quilter. Having initially been at £5,000, it has been frozen at £2,000 for the past five years, which covered the majority of savers' dividend income.

The Chancellor's move will mean more people end up paying tax on their dividends, he said.

"For a basic rate taxpayer, the reduction in the dividend allowance to £1,000 will mean they will end up paying £87.50 more in tax. Similarly, if you are a higher rate taxpayer this rises to £337.50 more in tax and £393.50 if you are an additional rate taxpayer. From April 2024, a basic rate taxpayer will pay £123.75 more, increasing to £506.25 and £590.25 for a higher rate and additional rate taxpayer respectively."

Delivering his Autumn Statement at the House of Commons today, Hunt also said the annual capital gains tax exemption will fall from £12,300 to £6,000 next year, and then be cut to £3,000 from April 2024.

"The cut in the dividend allowance and Capital Gains Tax threshold is a double whammy against investors," said Charles Incledon, client director at Bowmore Asset Management.

"Cuts to this income could cause a real squeeze on the finances of many small investors, especially those who are retired and depend on dividend income from their shares. Bad news considering that we have a cost of living crisis at the moment," he added.

Autumn Statement 22: Government unveils £13.6bn package to support business rates payers

Think tank Capital Economics had said that another possible measure would be raising the dividend tax rate by 1.25 percentage points across all three tax bands, but Hunt did not confirm this in his speech.

The chancellor also announced the government will freeze the employers' NICs threshold until April 2028. However, it will retain the Employment Allowance at its new, higher level of £5,000.

According to Hunt, some 40% of all businesses will still pay no NICs at all. Meanwhile, the VAT registration threshold will be maintained at its current level until March 2026.

Other measures include a series of "stealth" raids on income tax. The chancellor has also lowered the threshold at which people pay the 45p rate of income tax from £150,000 to £125,140.

A month ago, Hunt, who was appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer on 14 October, ripped up the bulk of former chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng's Mini Budget, reversing nearly all the tax measures introduced in the 'Growth Plan' unveiled on 23 September.

The measures he reversed included the £6bn cut in the basic rate of income tax, changes to dividend taxes, a VAT tax break for foreign shoppers and a freeze on alcohol duty.

Posted at 02/11/2022 22:22 by cassini
Reading through that first link, all the share prices appear wrong, so then all the dividend yields are wrong.

RIO isn't 6110p and Imperial isn't 1569p etc. In fact, the prices given look like a snapshot from mid-2021.

Posted at 15/10/2022 12:33 by ariane
Here’s the BHP dividend forecast for 2022 to 2024

This mining giant has paid out some huge dividends recently. Here, Edward Sheldon looks at the BHP

Group dividend forecast for the years ahead.

Edward Sheldon, CFA❯

Published 15 October, 8:47 am BST



Mining powerhouse BHP Group (LSE: BHP) has been a bit of a cash cow for investors in recent years.

Last financial year, for example, it rewarded shareholders with total regular dividends of USD $3.25 per share, which translates to a yield of about 13% at the current share price.

Is the company set to continue paying out monster dividends going forward? Let’s take a look at the BHP dividend forecast for the years ahead.


BHP dividend forecasts

First, there are a couple of things to explain.

The first is that BHP’s financial year ends on 30 June. So, the year ending 30 June 2023 is ‘FY2023’. The following year is ‘FY2024’.




The second is that BHP reports its financials, and declares its dividends, in US dollars. So, all forecasts are in dollars. This is important to note because the GBP/USD exchange rate is quite volatile at the moment. In other words, the yield on offer today could be quite different to the yield when the dividends are actually paid if exchange rates fluctuate.

As for the forecasts, right now City analysts expect BHP to pay out $2.09 per share for FY2023 and $1.86 per share for FY2024.

These projected payouts are lower than the $3.25 paid last financial year. However, they still translate to very high yields.

At today’s share price and exchange rate, the projected payout for FY2023 equates to a prospective yield of 8.3% while the estimated payout for FY2024 translates to a prospective yield of 7.4%.

Assuming that these dividend forecasts are accurate (analysts’ estimates can be way off the mark at times), BHP looks set to continue being a cash cow for investors.


Are BHP shares worth buying for income?

Would I buy BHP shares for the big dividends on offer?

The answer to that question is actually no.

One reason I’d pass on BHP is that the stock is ‘cyclical̵7; (mining companies’ profits rise and fall depending on commodity prices) and, therefore, quite volatile. For example, between mid-2014 and early 2016, BHP’s share price fell from near 1,600p to near 500p.


I don’t see the point of collecting a 8% yield if the share price can potentially fall around 70% like it did here. I’d need many years of dividends to make up for that kind of capital loss.


I prefer dividend stocks that are a little more stable in nature.

Another issue for me is the fact that BHP tends to cut its dividend when business conditions are challenging.

This is not ideal from an income-investing perspective.

I prefer to invest in companies that consistently increase their dividend payouts year after year.

I can rely on these kinds of businesses to provide me with a certain level of income.

So, while the yield here does look very attractive, I won’t be buying the shares for my portfolio any time soon.




Ed Sheldon has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK

Posted at 06/12/2021 08:40 by grupo guitarlumber
The Hague, December 6, 2021 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS") today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the third quarter 2021 interim dividend, which was announced on October 28, 2021 at US$0.24 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share").

Dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros at the rate of EUR0.2121per A Share. Holders of A Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or pounds sterling currency elections by November 26, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or 18.06p per A Share, respectively.

Dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling at the rate of 18.06p per B Share. Holders of B Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or euros currency elections by November 26, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or EUR0.2121per B Share, respectively.

Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from 1 December to 3 December 2021.

This dividend will be payable on December 20, 2021 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on November 12, 2021.

Taxation - cash dividend

Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax.

If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor.

Note

A different currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies.

Posted at 07/9/2021 21:33 by waldron
Published in:
Investing

7th September 2021

Tax on share dividends to increase by 1.25%. Here’s what it means for investors
Updated:

by
Karl Talbot

| 3 min read

Tax on share dividends to increase by 1.25%. Here’s what it means for investors







The government has announced a 1.25% increase in the tax on share dividends that will apply from April 2022. The news comes at the same time as it was announced that National Insurance contributions will increase by 1.25% next year.

The government says the rises will help fund health and social care in England. Both announcements are subject to a vote in the House of Commons.

So if you’re an investor, what does the new tax on share dividends mean for you?

Here’s what you need to know.

How much tax is currently paid on share dividends?

If you’re an investor, you currently get a dividend allowance of £2,000. So, if you receive dividends worth £2,000 or less, you don’t have to pay any tax on them.

For dividends of more than £2,000, the amount of tax you pay depends on your income tax band. This is unless your investments are held in an ISA, in which case your dividend payments remain tax free.

For non-tax-efficient investments, you must pay 7.5% tax on any dividends over £2,000 if you’re a basic rate taxpayer. If you’re a higher rate taxpayer, you must pay 32.5%, and it’s 38.1% if you’re an additional rate taxpayer.

You can find more information on income tax bands on the gov.uk website.

What are the changes to dividends tax?

From April 2022, the government is implementing a 1.25% rise in the tax on dividends to help fund social care. Analysts expect that the move will raise up to £600 million, with the majority of payers coming from the top 10% of households.

The new tax will not, however, apply to investments held within an ISA.

Why has dividends tax increased?

With a National Insurance hike of 1.25% also announced, many analysts feel that the dividends tax is a way for the government to show that it is keen to increase taxes on asset holders as well as those who rely on a working income.

Critics of the National Insurance hike have repeatedly pointed to the fact that it will not apply to most pensioners, landlords or those living off income from assets, suggesting that only those relying on a working income face the burden.

National Insurance, by definition, is also a regressive tax, meaning that an increase disproportionately impacts those on lower incomes. That’s because the amount of contributions you have to make, at a percentage level, decreases at higher incomes.

However, critics of the dividend tax rise consider it a token gesture. That’s because the 1.25% rise won’t apply to investments held in an ISA.
How has industry reacted?

Commenting on the changes, Tom Selby, head of retirement policy at AJ Bell, says that investors should now take the time to examine their portfolios in order to ensure they aren’t inadvertently paying more tax than they need to.

He explains: “The increase in dividend tax means people investing outside tax-sheltered wrappers like pensions and ISAs should review their portfolios to make sure they are making as much use as possible of their annual contribution allowances to keep their tax bills as low as possible.”

Will the tax increase definitely go ahead?

MPs will vote on the government’s health and social care plan, including the planned dividends tax rise, on Wednesday 8 September at 7pm.

While a number of cross-party MPs do not approve of the proposals, the policy is expected to pass through the House of Commons.

MyWalletHero…

Posted at 06/9/2021 08:44 by la forge
Royal Dutch Shell plc second quarter 2021 Euro and GBP equivalent dividend payments

Sep 6, 2021

The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc (“RDS”) today announced the pounds sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments in respect of the second quarter 2021 interim dividend, which was announced on July 29, 2021 at US$0.24 per A ordinary share (“A Share”) and B ordinary share (“B Share”).

Dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros at the rate of €0.2024 per A Share. Holders of A Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or pounds sterling currency elections by August 27, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or 17.38p per A Share, respectively.

Dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling at the rate of 17.38p per B Share. Holders of B Shares who have validly submitted US dollars or euros currency elections by August 27, 2021 will be entitled to a dividend of US$0.24 or €0.2024 per B Share, respectively.

Euro and pounds sterling dividends payable in cash have been converted from US dollars based on an average of market exchange rates over the three dealing days from 1 September to 3 September, 2021.

This dividend will be payable on September 20, 2021 to those members whose names were on the Register of Members on August 13, 2021.


Taxation - cash dividend

Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax.

If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor.

Posted at 29/7/2021 06:42 by waldron
The Hague, July 29, 2021 - The Board of Royal Dutch Shell plc ("RDS" or the "Company") today announced an interim dividend in respect of the second quarter of 2021 of US$ 0.24 per A ordinary share ("A Share") and B ordinary share ("B Share").

Chair of the Board of Royal Dutch Shell, Sir Andrew Mackenzie commented: "Shell's proven and sustainable cash generation across a range of macroeconomic scenarios has provided the Board confidence to increase shareholder distributions. As a result, the Board has decided to rebase the dividend per share to 24 US cents from the second quarter 2021 onwards."

Details relating to the second quarter 2021 interim dividend


Per ordinary share Q2 2021
RDS A Shares (US$) 0.24
RDS B Shares (US$) 0.24


It is expected that cash dividends on the B Shares will be paid via the Dividend Access Mechanism and will have a UK source for UK and Dutch tax purposes.

Cash dividends on A Shares will be paid, by default, in euros, although holders of A Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in US dollars or pounds sterling.

Cash dividends on B Shares will be paid, by default, in pounds sterling, although holders of B Shares will be able to elect to receive dividends in US dollars or euros.

The pound sterling and euro equivalent dividend payments will be announced on September 6, 2021.


Per ADS Q2 2021
RDS A ADSs (US$) 0.48
RDS B ADSs (US$) 0.48


Cash dividends on American Depository Shares ("ADSs") will be paid, by default, in US dollars.

RDS A and B ADSs are listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols RDS.A and RDS.B, respectively. Each ADS represents two ordinary shares, two A Shares in the case of RDS.A or two B Shares in the case of RDS.B. ADSs are evidenced by an American Depositary Receipt (ADR) certificate. In many cases the terms ADR and ADS are used interchangeably.

Dividend timetable for the second quarter 2021 interim dividend


Event Date
Announcement date July 29, 2021

Ex- Dividend Date for ADS.A and ADS.B August 12, 2021

Ex- Dividend Date for RDS A and RDS B August 12, 2021

Record date August 13, 2021

Closing of currency election date (see Note August 27, 2021
below)
Pound sterling and euro equivalents announcement September 6, 2021
date
Payment date September 20, 2021


Note

A different currency election date may apply to shareholders holding shares in a securities account with a bank or financial institution ultimately holding through Euroclear Nederland. This may also apply to other shareholders who do not hold their shares either directly on the Register of Members or in the corporate sponsored nominee arrangement. Shareholders can contact their broker, financial intermediary, bank or financial institution for the election deadline that applies.

Taxation - cash dividends

Cash dividends on A Shares will be subject to the deduction of Dutch dividend withholding tax at the rate of 15%, which may be reduced in certain circumstances. Non-Dutch resident shareholders, depending on their particular circumstances, may be entitled to a full or partial refund of Dutch dividend withholding tax.

If you are uncertain as to the tax treatment of any dividends you should consult your tax advisor.

Dividend Reinvestment Programmes ("DRIP")

The following organisations operate Dividend Reinvestment Plans ("DRIPs") which enable RDS shareholders to elect to have their dividend payments used to purchase RDS shares of the same class as those already held by them:

-- Equiniti Financial Services Limited ("EFSL"), for those holding shares
(a) directly on the register as certificate holder or as CREST Member and
(b) via the Nominee Service;

-- ABN-AMRO NV ("ABN") for Financial Intermediaries holding A shares or B
shares via Euroclear Nederland;

-- JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. ("JPM") for holders of A and B American
Depository Shares;

and

-- Other DRIPs may also be available from the intermediary through which
investors hold their shares.

Such organisations provide their DRIPs fully on their account and not on behalf of Royal Dutch Shell plc. Interested parties should contact DRIP Offerors directly.

More information can be found at https://www.shell.com/drip

To be eligible for the next dividend, shareholders must make a valid dividend reinvestment election before the published date for the close of elections.






(END) Dow Jones Newswires

Posted at 08/7/2021 18:18 by waldron
These UK stocks are expected to pay bumper dividends – but beware of broken promises, research says

Published Thu, Jul 8 20214:33 AM EDT

Elliot Smith
@ElliotSmithCNBC

Key Points

AJ Bell highlighted in a report Wednesday that investors will need to look carefully at the 10 firms expected to yield the highest payouts to shareholders this year, since several of them have a record of being forced to cut dividends during challenging times.

Rio Tinto is the highest-yielding individual stock in the FTSE 100, with an expected yield of 12%, followed by BHP at 9.2%, Imperial Brands at 8.7% and Evraz at 8.5%.



LONDON — Total FTSE 100 dividend payments are expected to rise by a quarter this year to £76.9 billion ($106.3 million), meaning the U.K.’s leading index is set to yield 3.7% for 2021, according to data aggregated by British stockbroker AJ Bell.

Meanwhile the index’s average dividend coverage ratio, which measures the number of times a company can pay dividends to its shareholders, has improved to 1.83x, its highest level since 2014.

To supplement the higher dividends, many FTSE 100 companies have begun to announce share buybacks. A total of twelve firms have so far announced buybacks to the aggregate tune of £7.2 billion: Barclays, Berkeley, BP, CRH, Diageo, Ferguson, NatWest, Rightmove, Sage, Standard Chartered, Unilever and Vodafone.


Share buybacks are when a company purchases its own shares from the open market, driving up the share price.

AJ Bell highlighted in a report Wednesday that investors will need to look carefully at the 10 firms expected to yield the highest payouts to shareholders this year, since several of them have a record of being forced to cut dividends during challenging times.



Top 10 yielders

Rio Tinto is the highest-yielding individual stock in the FTSE 100, with an expected yield of 12%, followed by BHP at 9.2%, Imperial Brands at 8.7% and Evraz at 8.5%.

“Forecast of yields in the region of 10% may make investors a little wary, given the shocking record of firms previously expected to generate such bumper returns, including Vodafone, Shell, Evraz itself and – when they were still in the FTSE 100 – Royal Mail, Marks & Spencer and Centrica,” said AJ Bell Investment Director Russ Mould.

“All were forecast to generate a yield in excess of 10% at one stage or another and all cut the dividend instead.”


UK small-cap stocks to continue to benefit in the coming months, strategist says

Mould added that China’s reported discontent with surging iron ore prices may lead some investors to question the likelihood of such a bumper payment from Rio Tinto. Analyst consensus does not anticipate a repeat performance in 2022, he pointed out.

The remaining companies in the top 10 are Persimmon (7.7%), Admiral Group (7.6%), M&G (7.5%), British American Tobacco (7.5%), Anglo American (7.2%) and Phoenix Group (6.9%).

Miners and banks also dominate the list of 10 companies expected to make the biggest individual contribution to the £15.3 billion total increase in FTSE 100 dividends this year, the report highlighted, with HSBC, Barclays, Lloyds and NatWest all featuring.

‘Dividend aristocrats’

Mould suggested that investors will need to assess concentration risk — the danger of having too much exposure to a particular sector or type of stock — when it comes to dividends as well as earnings, an issue often associated with seeking income from the U.K. stock market.

He also highlighted that historically, the highest-yielding stocks do not prove to be the best long-term investments.

“Often defending a high yield can be a burden for a firm, as it sucks cash away from vital investment in the underlying business, or can be a sign that the company is in trouble and investors are demanding such a high yield to compensate themselves for the (perceived) risks associated with owning the equity,” Mould said.

BlackRock: Neutral on U.S. stocks, likes cyclicals, Europe and Japan markets

“The strongest long-term performance often comes from those firms that have the best long-term dividend growth record, as they provide the dream combination of higher dividends and a higher share price – the increased distribution will over time drag the share price higher through sheer force.”

The FTSE 100 currently has 15 firms which can evidence a 10-year dividend growth track record, with nine firms having dropped off that list since the pandemic.

Industrial equipment rental company Ashtead tops the list, with a total return of 3,425.4% between 2011 and 2020, followed by Intermediate Capital at 1,031.1% and the London Stock Exchange at 991.2%.

The firms, which Mould dubs “dividend aristocrats,” are: Scottish Mortgage (865%), Spirax-Sarco (734.8%), Halma (703.4%), Croda (369.4%), RELX (368.6%), DCC (311.8%), Diageo (259.2%), Hargreaves Lansdown (258.7%), United Utilities (175.2%), National Grid (163.5%), Sage (94%) and British American Tobacco (69.9%).

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