Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
Cenkos Securities Plc LSE:CNKS London Ordinary Share GB00B1FLHR07 ORD 1P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  0.00 0.0% 64.50 63.00 66.00 65.00 64.50 64.50 423,328 09:00:14
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
General Financial 45.0 2.3 4.2 15.4 37

Cenkos Securities Share Discussion Threads

Showing 3501 to 3523 of 3575 messages
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DateSubjectAuthorDiscuss
30/12/2019
13:52
More to go but some resistance 70-75p
its the oxman
24/12/2019
14:11
Cenkos shares leap after founder takes fresh stake Https://www.ft.com/content/54172af0-256d-11ea-9305-4234e74b0ef3 Andy Stewart left the board of the London stockbroker almost a decade ago In recent months Cenkos has completed IPOs of companies including MJ Hudson and Brickability despite some of the worst conditions in UK equity markets for a decade Cat Rutter Pooley yesterday Financial Times Andy Stewart, the founder of two of the City’s highest profile independent brokerages, Collins Stewart and Cenkos Securities, has taken a fresh stake in Cenkos nine years after he left the broker. Mr Stewart has picked up a 7.4 per cent stake in Cenkos, the company said on Monday, partially reversing a series of share sales since 2010 that cut his holding from almost 23 per cent to zero. Shares in Cenkos jumped 12 per cent to 49.9p after his return to the shareholder register was disclosed. Cenkos’s share price has suffered in recent years from a dearth of UK IPOs, the area in which it specialises. The broker’s early success was driven by a close relationship with fund manager Neil Woodford, who backed many of its deals after Mr Stewart founded the company with colleagues from Collins Stewart in 2005. At its peak in 2007, a year after it floated on Aim, shares in Cenkos were worth more than 270p and Mr Stewart’s stake was valued at more than £40m. However, a decline in the number of deals since 2016, as well as heightened competition between small brokers with firms such as Numis and Peel Hunt coming to dominate the mid-market, has hit the shares of Cenkos as well as rivals such as WH Ireland and Arden Partners. Before Mr Stewart’s share purchase was announced, Cenkos’s market capitalisation on Friday was just £26m. A year ago Cenkos announced the return of co-founder Jim Durkin as chief executive in an effort to reverse a 90 per cent decline in profits during his 18-month absence from the company. Recommended Analysis UK politics & policy Emphatic UK election result stirs talk of a revival in dealmaking Mr Stewart was supportive of that move. But Mr Durkin on Monday said there had been no discussions with Mr Stewart about his return to the shareholder register of Cenkos. “It is nice to have him back on the register . . . [But] this decision is entirely his,” Mr Durkin told the FT. His own return to the helm was only confirmed in August, after the regulator took nine months to approve his appointment. But he has since sought to return Cenkos to its focus on dealmaking and has engineered a board reshuffle. In recent months Cenkos has completed IPOs of companies including MJ Hudson and Brickability despite some of the worst conditions in UK equity markets for a decade. Mr Durkin said the company’s performance during the second half of the year was likely to be better than the first half, when revenues fell from £18.1m to £10.6m and the broker reported the first loss in its 14-year history.
spob
24/12/2019
13:54
maybe this will be taken private, who knows very cheap stock though given the long term performance, dividend payments and cash on the balance sheet
spob
24/12/2019
13:15
If you read the whole post I'm asking for opinions. Do you have any? Is he building a stake for a takeover or on behalf of someone??R there any rumours out there
mattboxy
24/12/2019
13:04
United Oil & Gas plc still to come through as another IPO.
topvest
24/12/2019
13:03
That's excellent news. The Woodford backed activist investor is not the best of shareholders to have. I am genuinely optimistic on Cenkos for 2020. Deal flow should be much improved. Hopefully 2019 will be break-even or so. H2 transactions - £198m raised including 2 IPOs H1 transactions - £166m raised including 1 IPO Per the reported transactions. Is this the bottom?
topvest
24/12/2019
12:02
Looks like he got most of them from Crystal Amber.
trident5
24/12/2019
11:51
old news. came out yesterday
mikeoxard
24/12/2019
11:50
Major Shareholding Update The Company was notified on 20 December 2019 that Andrew Stewart (former Chief Executive Officer and a founder shareholder of the Company) has purchased shares in the Company. He has advised the Company that the total shareholding now controlled by him is 4,214,150 ordinary shares, representing 7.43% of the Company's issued share capital. Opinions please?
mattboxy
24/12/2019
11:30
Looking for a break of 60p
its the oxman
23/12/2019
14:27
Wasn’t Andy Stewart the guitarist in the Eurythmics ? With Annie Lenox on vocals ?
albert zog
23/12/2019
12:15
Still v cheap here c.50p
its the oxman
23/12/2019
10:36
"You haven't even mentioned the cheap GMO crops" ...nor the earlier onset of Alzheimer's in the USA .... that UK can look forwards to - see Trump. They are not called Brexidiots for nowt. That said, I expect UK market to rally as the USA did with Trump, low regulations and low wages are always good for stocks ... and I see Cenkos is starting to join in. Look forward to the ride and the takeover - and don't be short on AIM. ;)
keith95
23/12/2019
10:35
Well Andy Stewart thinks the doomsters are wrong and it is a good time to buy. Struth the loss of the Investment trust team is old news and they are working out their gardening leave anyway. If it is profitable enough it will be easier to replace in today's market anyway they are very lean and mean.
seagreen
22/12/2019
18:02
Crunch time for Aim after another bruising year Https://www.ft.com/content/fb3f2c72-227c-11ea-92da-f0c92e957a96 Market needs to innovate to stop decline becoming terminal Kate Burgess 4 hours ago Financial Times On Christmas Eve, shares in Aim-quoted Stirling Industries will be cancelled. It will be a swift and crushing end to a shortlived acquisition vehicle floated in 2018. It will also close a bruising year for London’s Alternative Investment Market. Stirling is being liquidated, having failed to raise the money it needed to buy Ipsen, a German steel-hardening business, from public or private equity investors. An illustration of the reluctance of investment institutions to back small companies, it marks a moment for Aim, which celebrates its 25th birthday next year. The number of companies on London’s junior market has almost halved since 2007. Then, Aim boasted a line-up of more than 1,600, now it has about 870. In fact, more companies quit Aim in 2018 — about 80 against almost 60 in 2019. But 65 companies joined the market last year. This year, new entrants won’t top 17. And little new money has been raised — only about £380m. That is more than small-caps raised elsewhere in the EU, but compares with £1,563m last year. One of 2019’s noisiest exits from Aim was by Goals Soccer Centres, the five-a-side group once backed by sporting entrepreneur Mike Ashley that uncovered accounting irregularities and unpaid VAT of more than £13m. It was delisted in September and sold via administration in November. GSC is one of Aim’s many miscounting sagas, ranging from Utilitywise to Eddie Stobart Logistics, which does nothing for Aim’s reputation as a Wild West market populated by cowboys and hustlers. Eddie Stobart found untold mathematical blunders in its accounts, suspended its shares in August and sold its operating businesses. It will be hard to hang on to its Aim quote much longer. Stirling Industries blamed geopolitical collywobbles for its demise. Other companies have variously denounced the high costs of maintaining a public market quote, regulation, corporate governance strictures and what brokers call dequitisation, the general reduction of share markets. Tax breaks on debt and low inflation are driving investors away from shares and towards bonds. At the same time, companies can raise money privately more easily without recourse to public markets. The worst defection for Aim may have been that of Shore Capital, the small company broker and Aim adviser, which deemed its listing expensive and pointless. The fall of one-time investment star Neil Woodford, a longstanding champion of Aim, has taken its toll too. Verseon, the biotech-blockchain enterprise, squarely blamed Woodford’s woes for blocking its ability to raise funds. It cancelled its quote last week. Also last week, shareholders in Defenx, the cyber security group floated on Aim at 148p a share in 2015, agreed that its majority owner, BV Technology of Italy, could take it off the market at 3p a share. Defenx argues it is too tiny and trading in its shares too sticky to win external backers. Similarly, Avesoro Resources, a gold miner operating in west Africa and once known as Aureus Mining, is being bought off the market by its Turkish majority owners. The group says it fears if it stays on Aim it will not be able to cover next year’s spending plans. Liquidity — how quickly shareholders can cash in — has been a big theme for regulators and investors following Mr Woodford’s fall, with compliance departments increasingly herding institutional investors away from small-caps and towards larger businesses. Jamie Hambro, chair of the eponymous wealth management group, worried this month that the perceived risk of illiquidity could spell the end for small-cap markets. That is exacerbated by EU rules (Mifid II) forcing price transparency on brokers, something Mr Hambro frets is killing off research. Research, says Aim cheerleaders, aids transparent pricing of stocks and lubricates trading. They warn if investors stop backing entrepreneurs, it will stymie innovation, growth and job creation. It is a glum message for the festive season. Some Aim groupies are exploring public-private crossover funds to help bridge the gap. Others hope for more tax perks to lift it out of the doldrums. But Aim already enjoys myriad reliefs, from stamp duty to eligibility for tax-light individual savings accounts. And politicians may not be so indulgent as before. This year, the Office of Tax Simplification started questioning the justification for Aim’s inheritance tax breaks. Aim’s defenders must come up with something more innovative than tax giveaways if the junior market is not to regress further.
spob
22/12/2019
15:04
keith95 20 Dec '19 - 18:07 - 3261 of 3263 0 0 1 A no deal Brexit cliff edge is certainly not off the table - because the EU will play hardball over UK regulations ... EU certainly does not want ... to use its own words ... a cut price competitor on its doorstep passing off maggoty orange juice and rat’s hair pepperoni pizza from USA as EU regulated foodstuff so the argument prevails. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Yes, but aren't these going to be the golden dividends of 'taking back control'? You haven't even mentioned the cheap GMO crops from America laced with glyphosate, which the UK, once it loses regulatory alignment with the EU, will be able to stack its cheaper shelves with. Can't wait.
brucie5
22/12/2019
12:15
From what I have read, Cenkos pay lower basic salaries but more generous bonuses. This means staff will likely favour Cenkos when times are good and the opposite in a weak market.
f15jcm
20/12/2019
18:32
Loss of the investment trust team not helpful - gone to Panmure Gordon
albert zog
20/12/2019
18:07
A no deal Brexit cliff edge is certainly not off the table - because the EU will play hardball over UK regulations ... EU certainly does not want ... to use its own words ... a cut price competitor on its doorstep passing off maggoty orange juice and rat’s hair pepperoni pizza from USA as EU regulated foodstuff so the argument prevails. Cenkos is cheap but has lost income streams from Woodford and its Oil/Gas researchers ... so it needs to redefine itself. I had a lot that luckily I bailed a year or so ago ... with a tiny holding now looking for Durkin to put it up for sale. GLA.
keith95
20/12/2019
15:32
Have checked and there is not going to be an update. They tend not to issue updates unless it's if results are likely to be ahead or behind expectations. Companies have to issue an update then. Recent transactions strongly suggest the worst is over and well and truly priced in too. It was looking much more optimistic for 2020 too, what with clear cut Election result which meant no more cliff edge Europe votes, and Johnson could revert to traditional One Nation Toryism. But no sooner thought that and it was back to possible cliff edge later next year. The last thing business needs is yet more uncertainty over Europe. Even so 2020 looks very unlikely to be as bad for the sector as 2019 and fingers crossed Cenkos continue to win new business. Note too (as Edison note showed) how very cheap Cenkos share price is compared with Numis. Yet Numis has done well since the Election whereas Cenkos continues to bump along at multi year lows. So it wouldn't need much for Cenkos share to recover fast.
kenmitch
20/12/2019
10:19
Hope so but care to explain why
farview1
16/12/2019
16:34
Cenkos should prosper in 2020
albert zog
16/12/2019
15:46
Very large volume today with an update due on Thursday. I significantly increased my position this morning. Not expecting Thursday's update to be glowing but the outlook should be positive given the political clarity (this stock hasn't moved since election).
f15jcm
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