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Share Name Share Symbol Market Type Share ISIN Share Description
British American Tobacco LSE:BATS London Ordinary Share GB0002875804 ORD 25P
  Price Change % Change Share Price Shares Traded Last Trade
  -41.50p -1.54% 2,660.00p 4,881,445 16:35:03
Bid Price Offer Price High Price Low Price Open Price
2,643.50p 2,645.00p 2,689.50p 2,626.00p 2,667.50p
Industry Sector Turnover (m) Profit (m) EPS - Basic PE Ratio Market Cap (m)
Tobacco 20,292.00 29,591.00 56,684.4
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Imperial Brands (IMB)

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DateSubject
16/12/2018
08:20
British American Tobacco Daily Update: British American Tobacco is listed in the Tobacco sector of the London Stock Exchange with ticker BATS. The last closing price for British American Tobacco was 2,701.50p.
British American Tobacco has a 4 week average price of 2,626p and a 12 week average price of 2,626p.
The 1 year high share price is 5,108p while the 1 year low share price is currently 2,626p.
There are currently 2,130,993,543 shares in issue and the average daily traded volume is 5,695,565 shares. The market capitalisation of British American Tobacco is £56,684,428,243.80.
12/12/2018
23:22
philanderer: Investors Chronicle: 'Tobacco shares hardest hit in 2018' IC View Investors that have been disappointed by the share price move in tobacco companies this year will be more pleased with their income. Both BATS and Imperial Brands feature in our Income Majors series. In its most recent update, BATS reiterated its commitment to a dividend payout ratio of at least 65 per cent. At 2,768p, the shares are trading at a discount to their five-year historical valuation to the sector, while offering a potential dividend yield of near 8 per cent. Buy Last IC View: Buy, 4,191p, 26 Jul 2018 HTTPS://www.investorschronicle.co.uk/shares/2018/12/12/tobacco-shares-hardest-hit-in-2018/
02/12/2018
09:26
unastubbs: www.telegraph.co.uk/investing/shares/questor-45pc-fall-british-american-tobacco-starting-look-cheap/ Questor share tip: higher taxes and marketing restrictions may finally be biting on tobacco firms but the fears look overblown Health campaigners will rejoice that 2018 is the year Big Tobacco ran into big trouble. Fund managers whose portfolios have benefited from bumper returns for decades will be less triumphal. Not since the major cigarette makers conceded two decades ago that smoking causes lung cancer and emphysema, and spent billions to settle legal claims have tobacco firms been more on the back foot. British American Tobacco, producer of the Lucky Strike and Dunhill brands, has seen its shares collapse by 45pc so far this year. They are now at their lowest level for more than seven years. It would seem that higher taxation and marketing restrictions are finally taking effect. Yet tobacco is a long way from being stubbed out completely. Last year BAT sold a staggering 686bn cigarettes after volumes fell by 2.6pc, compared with a 3.5pc market decline. Although volumes will continue to fall, there will still be more than a billion smokers in the world by 2025, roughly the same number as today, according to the World Health Organisation. The bigger worry is that the “next generation” products that are meant to drive top-line growth have encountered some teething troubles. In October, BAT warned that sales from vaping pens and “heat-not-burn” devices – which claim to offer more smoking-like pleasure than vaping but with fewer toxins – would reach £900m this year, not the hoped-for £1bn. Japan, the most advanced heat-not-burn market, disappointed and there was an e-cigarette product recall in the United States. The big firms are also closely watching vaping start-up Juul, which has become a teen craze with fruit flavours that have attracted the attention of regulators. That may have prompted the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to deliver a curveball last month that suggests a key part of the industry will soon go up in smoke. Its proposed ban on menthol cigarettes – another favourite with young smokers – will hit BAT hardest. One surprising statistic is that 35pc of the US tobacco market is of the minty variety. BAT knows this well, because in 2017 it paid £42bn for RJ Reynolds, which makes Newports, the biggest menthol brand. US menthol cigarettes are estimated to contribute 25pc of group earnings. All of this means it is not an ideal time for the chief executive, Nicandro Durante, to hand over the reins. Next April, Jack Bowles, the chief operating officer of the international business and 14-year company veteran, takes over as BAT boss. Durante’s exit, announced five days before Bowles was anointed, looked curiously disjointed. Bowles may find that the menthol problem he inherits doesn’t leave such a nasty taste in the mouth as the market fears. Number crunching from Deutsche Bank suggests a £1.3bn hit to earnings if the ban were imposed at the start of next year. But the bank reckons 60pc of lost menthol sales could be transferred to non-menthol cigarettes. The FDA has yet to put a date on its proposed ban, which will take several years to enact. Even if BAT eventually loses all menthol sales with no customer transfer to non-menthol, there is still some upside in the shares from here, Deutsche believes. There is also a balance sheet issue to weigh up. Concerns that BAT is carrying too much debt have got the short-sellers excited. Net borrowings equivalent to a toppy 3.6 times next year’s forecast earnings are a hangover from the Reynolds deal. One option to reduce debt would be to sell BAT’s near-30pc stake in ITC, a tobacco-heavy Indian conglomerate with which relations have been strained down the years. The stake is currently worth £11bn. After hosting a recent lunch with BAT’s management, UBS analysts reported in a research note that the company continued to consider the long-term opportunity for the asset but saw no reason to sell. We can cope, the message seems to be. Of course, investors will decide whether it is appropriate to own tobacco in their portfolio these days. Questor, which last rated BAT shares a hold in August, merely points out that, trading at a little over eight times next year’s forecast earnings, they have begun to look cheap – even with huge disruption ahead. A trading update on Dec 12 may help to lift the gloom. Questor says: buy Ticker: BATS Share price at close: £27.50
22/11/2018
18:44
this_time_its_different: This stock is trading very strange, the price is at 2011 levels now, this is more than a pull back, it's an absolute collapse in share price, which can only be achieved if future earnings are going to be severely dented. People are saying BATS is a strong buy now, but we haven't seen a bottom yet or retest of lows.
22/11/2018
11:30
this_time_its_different: Though Brexit being smooth, Fed stopping rate hikes and no more trade w-a-r will calm the markets and would lead to a rise in BATS share price regardless. The key test will be getting brexit through the UK parliament and the next FOMC meeting. IF both are successful, I see all stocks rallying....this includes BATS.
15/11/2018
22:14
action: ThisCompare BATS price with Imperial.Only 200p diff. It must be cheap in comparison to Imperial.
12/11/2018
13:43
creditcrunchies: Bats share price this year is the largest drop in % terms in the past 20 years even worse than the drop in the financial crisis. Apparently.
16/10/2018
17:40
this_time_its_different: Anything that affects earnings will be reflected in the share price. Fx affects earnings. This is why a lot of people have a home bias, just invest in UK domestic companies, so they don't need to worry about fx. This correlation has extended forever since BATS has non sterling revenue, this applies to all companies with foreign revenue. Once brexit took place and the £ fell from 1.5 to 1.3, BATS shot up because now non sterling revenue would be worth more in sterling. But put fx aside, the problems are much more serious than fx, the real problem is the moat being destroyed by generic vapes. I still don't think this stock can sell off too much, since it pays a divi. If the divi is suspended say down the line, then you have real problems. Right now the stock is at or near a bottom and I expect it to move up slowly.
21/9/2018
05:24
philanderer: Morning EI, I tend to agree with you re IMB. Jefferies: BATS board showed boss Durante the door News that British American Tobacco (BATS) chief executive Nicandro Durante is stepping down after 37 years with the business worries Jefferies which thinks it may be taken as a bad sign. Analyst Owen Bennett remained ‘bullish’; on the tobacco giant but added it was a strange time for Durante to announce his retirement next April amid a sector-wide malaise over slowing sales growth. ‘We think the market is likely to conclude that this was a board-driven decision in response to recent share price performance and investor frustration at a lack of communication or tangible guidance over the past 12 months.’ He added that he feared the ‘news will be used to justify the view that the business is in trouble’. The shares slipped 47p or 1.3% to £35.15, taking their decline this year to 28%, amid reports that chief marketing officer Andrew Gray was the frontrunner to succeed Durante. Citywire.co.uk
11/6/2018
08:18
speedsgh: Are tobacco investments going up in smoke? - HTTPS://www.investorschronicle.co.uk/shares/2018/06/07/are-tobacco-investments-going-up-in-smoke/ ... Favourites Imperial Brands is our pick of the two. Granted, our most recent buy tip hasn’t quite played out as we hoped. Over that time, the share price was hit by bad news, including the collapse of wholesaler Palmer and Harvey, as well as suggestions that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would cut down the amount of nicotine in combustible cigarettes sold in the US. Still, the company looks well placed to deal with the shift from traditional tobacco to next-generation products. Its exposure to the US, regardless of the FDA’s decision, is less than its closest rival. It’s also done well to maintain cash flow, and maintain its place on our list of income majors. At 2,721p, or 10 times forward earnings, the shares don’t look expensive compared with their own history, either. Outsiders British American Tobacco isn’t a traditional ‘outsider’. In our view, the buy case for Imperial is just a touch stronger. BATS recently completed one of the biggest M&A transactions in history with the £41.8bn purchase of Reynolds America – the largest ever purchase of a tobacco company. This has made it the biggest vaping company in the world, so it too looks well placed to benefit from the shift to alternative products. But the Reynolds deal also made it more exposed to the US market, which could see a tightening in regulation. At 3,774p, or merely two times forward earnings, the shares look unbelievably cheap. But there’s likely a reason for this. The expert's view Sector consolidation means that tobacco is now dominated by a small handful of very large multinationals, known as the 'Big Five': Philip Morris International, British American Tobacco, Japan Tobacco, China Tobacco and Imperial Brands. Numerous smoking bans imposed around the world have put pressure on the industry to develop markets and alternative products to help grow revenues. Fortunately for the industry, declines in tobacco consumption volumes in the UK, mainland Europe and the US have been offset by growth in regions such as the Middle East, Eastern Europe and other emerging economies. The development of next generation products, such as e-cigarettes, which are heavily marketed, is also helping to meet demand for less harmful forms of smoking. Currently there are few restrictions on the use of e-cigarettes, but some countries have raised the possibility of banning them in future. Both British American Tobacco and Imperial Brands were rising nicely until the middle of last year, partly due to well-regarded acquisitions in the US where both derive a significant portion of their revenues. But when the FDA announced plans to reduce nicotine addiction through tobacco products shares across the board were hit hard. As dramatic as the plan may sound, it’s worth noting that the details of exactly how it will be implemented may not be clear for some time and it’s likely that any major changes will be phased in gradually, which gives companies time to adjust and grow their non-nicotine next generation products. Judging by recent comments from the largest tobacco group, Philip Morris International, the sector will need to work harder and faster to grow its next generation sales in order to avoid a gap as tobacco volumes fall. Investors need to be especially careful not to become overly obsessed with short-term movements in the shares of the big tobacco groups. They are mainly suitable for investors with a medium- to long-term outlook who are mostly interested in maximising income in their portfolios thanks to the steady nature of their revenues and the amount of cash they generate. That, along with the huge range of markets they operate in, gives them a great ability to pay dividends and increase those consistently over time. With that in mind factors such as cash flow and dividend cover are much more important than daily changes in the share price. On top of that both BAT and Imperial Brands pay quarterly dividends with above-average yields. IC View Both these companies have done well to adapt to an ever-changing market for nicotine products. Traditional cigarettes may well represent the core of both businesses for some time, as it still accounts for a chunk of revenues – not to mention the fact that customers are quite literally addicted to these products. This could support the development of next-generation products, preventing investment being at the expense of cash flow or dividends. Nicotine is still a highly addictive substance no matter the delivery method, be it combustibles, vaporisers or some other further innovation. If customers are hooked, then the cash flows should keep coming well into the future.
20/4/2018
09:46
andrewbaker: Yes, it's crazy; but then I've been saying the world has gone crazy for years now. BATS is dropping because of so many reasons, some listed in posts above, but none of them are about the viability of the business and its profits and ability to pay covered dividends with capital growth in the share price too (when a realistic value returns to the share price, of course). I've broken my rule(s) about buying here (percentage of one holding, falling knife, etc ...), and bought more every time the price dropped again; and I've just bought more. I don't smoke, don't like smoking, and think those who do need help to stop; but I'm not about to go on a pilgrimage, soap box or other moralistic campaign: if people want to sell BATS at the current price, and want to sell BATS to me at the current price, yes please: I'm here. Sometimes a crazy world can be rewarding.
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